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Today's News

  • The first nuclear fallout was in N.M.

    Part 2 of 2

    For days after the first atomic test on July 16, 1945, a powdery ash floated from the sky, coating everything in the Tularosa Basin, including cattle and crops. Then it rained, washing the stuff into wells and water sources.
    Ranchers noticed that their cattle turned white or partially white. Family pets similarly exposed had partially white coats. A rancher said his beard stopped growing for a few months, when it began growing again, it was white.
    Locals visited Trinity Site, walked around the cavity left behind, picked up the green glass that was sand before the blast, and looked at the twisted remains of the tower that suspended the bomb.
    Immediately after the blast, as a red haze descended, scientists and military personnel scrambled to evacuate.
    North of Trinity Site, men waited with vehicles to evacuate civilians, but radiation readings indicated they were safe, so far as they knew then.
    Photographs taken two months later show Manhattan Project leader J. Robert Oppenheimer and other scientists, unprotected, examining the tower’s remnants.
    Today, knowing what we know, it’s surprising how casual everyone was. It was the world’s first nuclear fallout, and New Mexico was the recipient.

  • Johnson, Martinez, Smoltz and Biggio ready to enter Hall

    COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. (AP) — Three dominated on the mound, the other excelled at three positions up the middle. Together, pitchers Randy Johnson, Pedro Martinez, John Smoltz and multi-talented Craig Biggio left a remarkable imprint on baseball.
    Playing through an era tainted by steroids and dominated by offense — compliments of bulked-up sluggers, a smaller strike zone and smaller ballparks — the trio of pitchers combined for 735 wins, 11,113 strikeouts and nine Cy Young Awards. And the indefatigable Biggio became the only player in major league history with at least 3,000 hits, 600 doubles, 400 stolen bases and 250 home runs while being asked to play four positions in his 20-year career.
    All four, elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in January, will be inducted Sunday in Cooperstown.
    "I don't condone anybody doing anything bad as far as cheating the game," said Martinez, who joins former Giants right-hander Juan Marichal (1983) as the only natives of the Dominican Republic elected to the hall. "How did I feel pitching in the juice era? I wouldn't want it any other way. For me, there's no crying. I mean, as far as the way I did compete, I know I did it right. I did it the right way."

  • Brady vows to fight on; Kraft says he regrets not doing so

    FOXBOROUGH, Mass. (AP) — New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady vowed on Wednesday to fight his four-game "Deflategate" suspension, and team owner Robert Kraft opened training camp by saying he continues to "believe and unequivocally support" the three-time Super Bowl MVP.
    "It is completely incomprehensible to me that the league continues to take steps to disparage one of its all-time great players, and a man for whom I have the utmost respect," Kraft said. "I was wrong to put my faith in the league."
    Taking the podium a day after NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell upheld Brady's suspension, Kraft said he didn't fight the team's penalty — a $1 million fine and the loss of two draft picks — because he thought the league would go easy on the star quarterback.
    Now, he said, he regrets his decision.
    "I have come to the conclusion that this was never about doing what was fair and just," Kraft said, apologizing to fans and to Brady. "I truly believe that what I did in May ... would make it much easier for the league to exonerate Tom Brady. Unfortunately, I was wrong."
    The NFL Players Association said later Wednesday that it will file a lawsuit in federal court in Minnesota challenging the punishment.

  • Isotopes score four in ninth to beat Salt Lake

    After giving up the lead in the top of the ninth, the resilient Albuquerque Isotopes (47-57) scored four runs in the bottom of the inning for a 7-6 walk-off victory against the Salt Lake Bees (41-63) Tuesday night at Isotopes Park.
    After four consecutive singles to begin the inning, Tim Smalling scored the winning run on a passed ball.
    The first eight innings of the game were tightly contested.
    After Albuquerque jumped out to a 1-0 lead on a Tommy Murphy two-out RBI single in the first, Salt Lake took a 2-1 lead with two runs in the fifth inning.
    The Isotopes and Bees traded runs in the sixth before the ’Topes were able to tie it at three in the seventh inning on a Brock Bond double.
    The ninth inning, however, provided all the fireworks for the night. Salt Lake plated a trio of runs in the final frame, highlighted by a two-run homer.
    Kyle Parker, Tommy Murphy, Roger Bernadina and Smalling recorded four straight singles to begin the ninth and cut the Isotopes deficit to 6-5.
    Bond then stepped in and picked up his third hit of the night, an RBI single to tie the game at six.
    With runners on first and third, the second pitch to Rafael Ynoa escaped the catcher, giving Albuquerque a 7-6 victory.

  • Local golfers win in Pagosa

    Three Northern New Mexico Senior Men’s Golf Association (NNMSMGA) tournaments took place in Pagosa Springs, Colorado, on July 14-16.
    Los Alamos golfers continued to do well on the tour.
    The first day featured a two-man best ball tournament.
    Los Alamos’ Ron Krantz and Santa Fe’s Don Holifield teamed up to win the second flight. They shot a 72 gross score.
    Los Alamos’ Ken Koch and Alamosa, Colorado’s Dean Boice shot a 73 gross score to finish second in the first flight.
    Krantz also landed closest to the pin on the sixth hole while Don Pompeo landed closest to the pin on the 11th hole.
    On July 15 the players competed individually.
    Krantz finished second in the second flight with a gross score of 85.
    Jim Steedle won the fourth flight with a 93 gross score.
    Pompeo was the third flight’s net winner with a 65. Pompeo also landed closest to the pin again, this time on the fourth hole.
    Bob Quick, meanwhile, landed closest to the pin on both the sixth and the 12th holes.
    On the final day in Pagosa Springs, no local golfers were among the top finishers in their respective flights. Koch, however, landed closest to the pin on the 11th hole.
     

  • Woodroffe just misses her prediction

    Laura Woodroffe had the best prediction in Tuesday’s Pace Race.
    Woodroffe only missed her predicted time by 3 seconds.
    Tuesday’s Pace Race — the Lawrence E. Wangen Memorial Race — was held on the trails behind the Larry R. Walkup Aquatic Center.
    The race included one-mile and 5K routes on dirt trails and a one-mile paved course.
    The second best prediction belonged to Zach Medin, who was 8 seconds off.
    Joan Williams recorded a 12-second difference. Bob Weeks was 15 seconds off his prediction.
    In the one-mile races, 11-year-old Jason Pieck finished first in 9 minutes, 41 seconds. Savanna Strother was the top female. The 7-year-old finished with a time of 11:31.
    Ted Romero was the fastest finisher in the 5K, recording a 23:58. Roxana Candia was the fastest female. She finished in 26:28.
    Next Tuesday’s Pace Race will start at 6 p.m. The races will begin at the San Ildefonso play lot, which is located on Barranca Mesa at the junction of San Ildefonso and Barranca Road.
    One-and three-mile paved courses will be available.
    For more information call 672-1639 or visit the club’s website, atomicrunners.com
     

  • Today in history July 29
  • Vehicles collide near guard post

    A traffic accident involving three vehicles occurred in front of the West Jemez Road guard post a few minutes ago.
    There was a chain-reaction rear-end collision involving the vehicles — one of which was a government vehicle — near the security checkpoint near the intersection with Camp May Road. One of the vehicles was attempting to turn left onto Camp May Road when it was struck.

    A reporter on the scene said an occupant on one of the vehicles was transported to Los Alamos Medical Center. There was no report on possible injuries to the occupant.

  • Canyon side cleanup completed

    The Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management announced today that the EM’s Los Alamos Field Office recently completed a steep canyon-side cleanup of mercury-contaminated soil on DOE property just south of a shopping center here.
    The project was finished successfully in about five weeks, which was approximately three weeks ahead of schedule, according to the DOE.
    The field office, management and operations contractor Los Alamos Nuclear Security, LLC, and subcontractor TerranearPMC completed the work.
    “We are committed to reducing the laboratory’s historical footprint and intend to continue to make progress on environmental legacy cleanup,” said Christine Gelles, the field office's acting manager.
    Experts used a specialized telescoping crane and spider excavator to remove 160 cubic yards of mercury-contaminated soil from the rugged canyon side.
    The contaminants derived from Manhattan Project and early Cold War era operations at Solid Waste Management Unit 32-002(b2) at the former Technical Area 32, which was the site of a small medical research facility.
    After results of the excavation sampling confirmed that the human health and environmental risk at the site was fully addressed, the team restored the site.

  • Machines may help with chile crop

    LAS CRUCES (AP) — A group of investors and inventors are set to launch a test run they believe could save New Mexico chile.
    The Las Cruces Sun-News reports the group this week plans scaled-up trial runs of mechanized harvesting and de-stemming of green chile.
    Experts and farmers say mechanization is the best way to halt, and even reverse, a long-term trend of declining chile acreage in New Mexico.
    Federal numbers showed overall chile acreage harvested across New Mexico fell in 2014 to a 43-year low.
    The trial runs involve harvesting machines made in the U.S., as well as an Israeli company.