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Today's News

  • Road Closure Alert: West Road closed Saturday

    Los Alamos National Laboratory will close West Road Saturday for safety reasons, the county announced Friday.

    West Road, owned by LANL, will be closed to vehicle traffic to ensure public safety while workers can perform tree trimming activities in the area between 9 a.m.- 2 p.m.

    West Road is the road that leads into Los Alamos Canyon to the Ice Rink and frequently used by motorists to access Pajarito Mountain. Motorists will need to travel through the LANL security portal to access Pajarito Mountain during these hours Saturday.

  • The Latest: New Mexico governor vetoes university funding

    SANTA FE (AP) — New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez has vetoed major portions of a $6.1 billion spending bill for the coming fiscal year, including funding for higher education and the Legislature.
    The Republican governor on Friday said in a veto message that the state's Democrat-led Legislature has refused to bear its fair share of reductions in state spending.
    In vetoing funding for state colleges and universities, Martinez chastised the state Senate for refusing to hold hearings on her nominations for regents. She says funding issues for higher-education and political appointments can be addressed during an upcoming special legislative session.
    Martinez also has vetoed a capital spending bill that would have restored $46 million in money taken from public school district reserves this year to address a state general fund deficit.
    The governor favors using those funds instead to shore up state finances and avoid proposed tax increases.
    ___
    3:00 a.m.
    New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez is drawing a line in the sand against tax increases and state government spending with hours left to sign or veto provisions of a budget plan from the Legislature.
    Martinez has until noon on Friday to consider a $6.1 billion spending bill that shores up funding for public schools and courts in the coming fiscal year.

  • Honeybee workshop at the Nature Center

    Have you ever wondered what goes on in the life of a busy bee? The Pajarito Environmental Education Center will offers a workshop with Dorothy Brown at the Los Alamos Nature Center about the biology and colony dynamics of honeybees from 1:30-3:30 p.m. Sunday.
    This will be a great introduction for anyone curious about these non-native pollinators.
    What is happening inside the seemingly crowded honeybee colonies? Dorothy Brown will discuss the three castes of honeybee and how they contribute to the super-organism called the colony.
    Participants will take a journey through the hive and learn all about the complexities that make a colony work. This workshop is perfect for those considering starting to keep bees.
    Brown started Langstroth beekeeping in the Finger Lakes Region of Upstate New York in 1974. She later kept some colonies in the Bay Area of Northern California. In 2006, she and Kate Whealen both took the Ecoversity class in topbar beekeeping taught by Les Crowder. She has a degree in Natural Resources from Cornell University and keeps a topbar colony on her carport roof in Los Alamos.
    Registration is required for this program, and is available at peecnature.org or by calling 662-0460. The cost is $8 for PEEC members and $10 for non-members.

  • LA native, poet to speak at WR library

    Los Alamos native and poet Allison Cobb will return for a special event Sunday to celebrate National Poetry Month.
    Cobb will read from her new poetry book, “After We All Died,” and an ongoing project, “Plastic: an autobiography,” both of which feature Los Alamos, at 1 p.m. Sunday at White Rock Branch Library in the multi-purpose room, 10 Sherwood Blvd., White Rock.
    Cobb is the author of “Born 2” (Chax Press); “Green-Wood” (Factory School); “Plastic: an autobiography” (Essay Press EP series); and “After We All Died” (Ahsahta Press), which was a finalist for the National Poetry Series.
    Cobb works for the Environmental Defense Fund and lives in Portland, Oregon, where she co-curates The Switch reading, art, and performance series.
    Cobb’s work combines historical and scientific research, essay and poetry to address issues of landscape, politics and ecology.
    She was a 2015 finalist for the National Poetry Series; a 2015 Djerassi Resident Artist; a 2014 Playa Resident Artist; received a 2011 Individual Artist Fellowship award from the Oregon Arts Commission; and was a 2009 New York Foundation for the Arts Fellow.

  • Entering World War I, American soldiers depended on foreign weapons tech

    BY DAVID LONGENBACK
    Pennsylvania State University

  • TRAVEL: A journey through history along the Birmingham Civil Rights Trail

    “It began at Bethel.” With these words, historian and educator Dr. Martha Bouyer proceeded to take me back in time to the birth of the Birmingham Civil Rights Movement. “The Movement,” as its members called it, started at Bethel Baptist Church, under the steerage of the church’s fiery pastor, Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth. It was Shuttlesworth who organized the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights (ACMHR) after the State of Alabama declared the NAACP a foreign corporation which could no longer exist. This was in response to the Reverend’s refusal to turn over the names of the local members of the organization.
    To many, Shuttlesworth’s name might be unfamiliar. I was unaware of this man’s contributions to the Civil Rights Movement until I visited Birmingham on an historical tourism trip. Shuttlesworth emerged as a “hidden figure,” who was often shadowed by other such well-known leaders of the time as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Reverend Ralph Abernathy. But, it was Shuttlesworth who initially galvanized the black community with the aim of dismantling the city’s segregation ordinances. He was the spark that created the flame.

  • Wildfire Day set for April 15; vendors needed

    “Wildfire Day” will take place from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. April 15. The Los Alamos Fire Department is seeking vendors interested in providing information about fire mitigation and defensible space services.
    The event is held at Ashley Pond Park and vendors will be located in the Justice Center parking lot.
    Vendors interested in hosting a booth for “Wildfire Day” are asked to contact the Los Alamos Fire Department’s Administrative Office at 662-8317 or send an e-mail to the event coordinator.
    Permit forms will be required; interested vendors can visit this link (losalamosnm.us/cms/one.aspx?pageId=7471419) to download the forms.
    Completed forms and payment for the booth must be received at the Parks, Recreation and Open Space Division Office (located in the Aquatic Center) no later than April 12.

  • New Mexico, Texas seek licenses to store spent nuclear fuel

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — The race for what to do with spent fuel generated by the nation's nuclear power plants is heating up as backers of a plan to build a temporary storage site in New Mexico made the rounds in Washington, D.C., on Wednesday in hopes of gaining support for their proposal.
    Holtec International and a coalition of local leaders from southeastern New Mexico first announced plans two years ago to construct a state-of-the-art, below-ground space for temporarily housing the tons of spent fuel that has been piling up at reactors around the U.S.
    The company recently submitted its application for licensing to the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission, starting what will be a yearslong review process. It will take federal regulators 60 days to determine if the application is complete and then the more in-depth work will begin.
    The agency is already reviewing an application from a West Texas company that treats and disposes of radioactive waste in a remote area not far from the New Mexico border. Waste Control Specialists has proposed storing some 5,000 metric tons of spent fuel.
    Federal officials have long acknowledged that the future of nuclear energy in the U.S. depends on the ability to manage and dispose of used fuel and high-level radioactive waste.

  • Public invited to free prostate cancer seminar

    The Los Alamos Council on Cancer invites the public to a free seminar at 6 p.m. April 13 to learn about prostate cancer.
    The Dr. Peter J. Lindberg Memorial Seminar is presented by Dr. Fabio Almeida, a board member and medical advisor of the Prostate Cancer Research Institute, on current and emerging PET/CT imaging techniques in recurring prostate cancer.
    Dr. James Ziomek, a colleague and friend of Lindberg, will provide introductory comments.
    The seminar will be held at the First Baptist Church, 2200 Trinity Drive in Los Alamos.
    Preceding the speaker, a complimentary, light dinner will begin at 5:15 p.m.  
    Attendees who would like to participate in the dinner are asked to register at LosAlamosCouncilOnCancer.Org, or email the Los Alamos Cooperative extension Service at losalamos@nmsu.edu or phone 662-2656 by Saturday.
    Those not participating in the dinner are asked to register at the same sites.  
    The public is encouraged to join in learning new techniques in the early detection of recurrent prostate cancer and to honor Lindberg for his many years of devoted and compassionate service to our community
    Los Alamos Medical Center is a provider approved through the California Board of Registered Nursing (provider number 15835) and this seminar awards 1.5 (CE) Continuing Education contact hours.

  • Review: ‘In the Mood for Love’ explores cultural shifts of 1962 Hong Kong

    Fidelity and appearances take centerstage in “In the Mood for Love” (2000, rated PG, subtitled), showing at 6:30 p.m. Thursday in Mesa Public Library’s upstairs meeting-room theater.
    The free screening is part of the Mesa Public Library Free Film Series.
    Writer and director Kar-Wai Wong’s internationally award-winning film – including best actor (Tony Chiu-Wai Leung) and technical grand prize at Cannes – delights in the styles and cultural shifts of 1962 Hong Kong, and delights in fomenting questions about loyalty, sexuality, pride and decorum.
    Mrs. Chan (Maggie Cheung) and Mr. Chow (Tony Chiu-Wai Leung) have recently become neighbors in a crowded apartment building. Both of their spouses travel frequently, leaving Chan and Chow to become friends in their absence.
    It doesn’t take long for Chan and Chow to realize that their spouses are often away at the same time, and that they are having an affair.