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Today's News

  • Pet of the Week 11-12-17

    Every dog has its day, it’s said.

    Ellie’s day hasn’t happened yet – and that’s a golden opportunity for you.

    She’s shy and sweet and just beginning to know that there’s more out there.

    Like a trail and a leash and a person who is confident and wise – someone who’s willing to show her that she’s got a lot to give, too.

    She’s available for adoption at the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter. There’s an adoption fee of $75.

    At less than 18 months old, Ellie is a mixed breed, and medium-sized, with Australian cattle dog strongly indicated.

    She’s spayed, vaccinated and micro-chipped.

    Around other dogs, it would be best they are near her size, and if children are present, it’s best they are at least 8 years old.

    She needs a secure yard and someone who understands what a dog needs – kindness, patience and a bit of training.

    The shelter is at 226 East Road. More information is available by calling (505) 662-8179.

  • Bergdahl decision erodes military culture

    The Wall Street Journal on U.S. Army Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl’s sentence and the U.S. Navy’s report on ships’ collisions with civilian vessels:

    The military is one of the few institutions that Americans still hold in high esteem, but that should never be taken for granted. Two events late last week suggest that even the military’s culture of high performance can be eroded without constant attention.

    The first was a military judge’s decision to let off U.S. Army Sergeant Bowe Bergdahl with a slap on the wrist for desertion in Afghanistan in 2009. After a court martial, Army Colonel Jeffery Nance recommended that Bergdahl be dishonorably discharged, demoted to private and forfeit $10,000 in pay. Prosecutors had sought 14 years in prison.

    Bergdahl was captured by the Taliban and held prisoner for nearly five years, a terrible ordeal to be sure. But those most outraged by the wrist slap are other members of the armed services who fear the damage to military discipline. Bergdahl deserted on the battlefield in a forward post – the worst betrayal you can make against your fellow soldiers save for fragging them with friendly fire.

  • Virginia victory a referendum on President Trump

    The Roanoke Times on Democrats’ victory in Virginia serving as a referendum on President Donald Trump:

    Donald Trump lost Tuesday. Bigly.

    He wasn’t on the ballot in Virginia but make no mistake, he’s the reason the race turned out like it did.

    In a normal year, Democrat Ralph Northam would not have won as easily as he did.

    In a normal year, Northam may not have won at all.

    Four years ago, Terry McAuliffe won with just under 48 percent of the vote in a three-way race. Even then, the McAuliffe barely scraped by against Ken Cuccinelli, a polarizing figure who turned off many moderate voters.

    This time around, Republican Ed Gillespie was as mainstream a Republican as you’d find. He seemed well-positioned to win back the suburban moderates who first defected from Cuccinelli and then recoiled from Trump a year ago. And yet none of that seemed to matter, not with Virginia voters feeling the way they do about Trump. They didn’t vote for Trump a year ago and in exit polls Tuesday they made it clear they liked him even less. In the only poll that matters – the one held at the ballot box – voters went for Democrats in a way that seems impossible to explain except as a reaction to Trump.

  • Board: Dem broke campaign rules in Albuquerque mayor's race

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — An ethics board says Democratic Albuquerque mayoral candidate Tim Keller broke campaign finance rules when his publicly financed campaign accepted "in-kind" cash donations.

    The Albuquerque Journal reports the city's Board of Ethics & Campaign Practices issued its ruling Monday — a day before the city's runoff election. But the board did not impose any penalties against Keller.

    Republican Dan Lewis, Keller's opponent, said in a statement that the ruling was proof Keller "lied to Albuquerque voters and illegally worked with his political allies to funnel cash to his campaign."

    Keller said he accepts the board decision and the ruling gave "needed clarity going forward."
     

  • Atomic City Update: Fall sports provided thrills for LAHS sports fans

    It seems like just yesterday that the fall sports season was getting underway at Los Alamos High School. And now, in the blink of an eye, the season has come to an end.

    And what a season it was. There were outstanding performances across the board, as all of the teams provided excitement for this community.

    The cross country teams once again proved they are among the best programs in the state, as both teams once again finished in the top three at the state meet last weekend.

    Perhaps the most exciting thing about these teams is that the future looks so bright.

    The top runners for both the boys and girls teams were freshman, Rafael Sanchez and Lidia Appell. As they continue to grow over the next few years, they will only get better and better.

    Equally exciting were the soccer teams, both of which were factors in the state championship tournament for the third year in a row.

    The accomplishments of the girls’ soccer team at LAHS are impossible to ignore.

    With an entirely new coaching staff, the team won 17 games and advanced to the state championship game with one of the most balanced offensive attacks in the state.

    The boys’ team was equally impressive, battling through major adversity to win 15 games and advance to the state semifinals.

  • N.M land commissioner may run for governor as Libertarian

    New Mexico land commissioner may go Libertarian

    SANTA FE (AP) — A family member and political spokesman says New Mexico State Land Commissioner Aubrey Dunn is seriously considering a run for governor under the Libertarian Party.

    Albuquerque-based attorney Blair Dunn said Monday that his father, Aubrey Dunn, is giving "heavy consideration" to leaving the Republican Party to run for New Mexico governor as a Libertarian candidate or independent of any party. Second-term GOP Gov. Susan Martinez cannot seek re-election in 2018.

    Aubrey Dunn has said he will not seek re-election as land commissioner in 2018, and briefly campaigned this year for Congress in New Mexico's southern district before withdrawing.

    Support for Libertarian presidential candidate Gary Johnson in 2016 elections has made it easier for Libertarian candidates to get on the ballot in New Mexico, and several other states including Iowa, Kentucky and Massachusetts.

  • Police Beat 11-12-17

    Police Beat items are compiles from public information contained in Los Alamos Police Department records.
    Charges or citations listed in the Police Beat do not imply guilt or non-guilt. The Los Alamos Police Department uses the term “arrest” to define anyone who has been physically arrested, served a court summons or issued a citation.

    Nov. 1
    2:10 p.m. – Police were investigating a report of rape.
    5:03 p.m. – An individual was arrested as a result of warrant involving drugs.

    Nov. 3
    7:28 p.m. – Police responded to Los Alamos Middle School to take information regarding a warning.

    Nov. 4
    4:41 p.m. – Police responded to a call of shoplifting at Smiths.

    Nov. 6
    3:16 p.m. – Someone reported a vehicle had been scratched to the Police Department.

  • New Mexico Dem congressional hopeful arrested for stalking

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A New Mexico man running for the state's southern congressional seat as a Democrat has been arrested for stalking.

    KRQE-TV in Albuquerque reports that David Alcon (al-COHN') was arrested Friday at an Albuquerque apartment complex after authorities had been searching for him for nearly two weeks.

    Santa Fe police issued a warrant for his arrest last month in connection with accusations that he sent graphic text messages to a woman he saw at a Halloween party. The woman told police that Alcon then stalked her outside her apartment.

    Alcon is one of four Democrats seeking the U.S. House seat now held by Republican Rep. Steve Pearce, who is running for governor.

    Alcon was previously convicted of stalking a woman in 2007.
    It was not known if he had an attorney.
     

  • New Mexico man facing 11th DWI _ after released from jail

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A New Mexico man is facing his 11th drunken-driving charge after police say he led them in a high-speed chase — 10 hours following his release from jail on another DWI conviction.

    The Santa Fe New Mexican reports police say 43-year-old Henry Gonzales led officers on a chase that reached 75 mph on city streets in the early morning hours of Nov. 4. Police say officers had to use a stun gun during the arrest.

    According to a criminal complaint, there was an open bottle of Crown Royal on the passenger seat of Gonzales' car.

    Gonzales last was convicted of DWI for an incident in May 2016. In that case, records show, he also led city police on a high-speed chase.

    It was not known if he had an attorney.
     

  • LANL Foundation brings science to classrooms

    CHIMAYO — A huge warehouse here holds a treasure trove – boxes filled with materials needed to teach young students lessons about energy, matter, or other science topics.

    Operated by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Foundation, a nonprofit with programs fostering educational opportunities in communities in the shadow of the national laboratory in Los Alamos, the 7-year-old program offers science education modules or “kits” for northern New Mexico elementary classrooms.

    And, they deliver.

    LANL Foundation officials provided a tour of the warehouse earlier this week to representatives of Sens. Tom Udall, D-NM, and Martin Heinrich, D-NM. The tour offered a ground-floor view of the Inquiry Science Education Consortium, which includes providing professional development for the hundreds of teachers who receive the modules or kits, twice a year.

    Two science education organizations developed the curriculum on which the modules are based, the Lawrence Hall of Science at the University of Berkeley and Science Resource Center of the Smithsonian Institute, according to the LANL Foundation. Classrooms at each grade level use two modules a year; one is focused on Earth science, the other on physical science.