.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Escapee receives probation

    Susan Reass, the woman who escaped from custody during a medical checkup Feb 16, received a year of unsupervised probation for her attempt, according to magistrate court documents. She must also pay $73 in court costs.
    Conditions of her probation include staying away from establishments that sell or serve liquor. She must also not be in possession of firearms, explosive or any other type of explosive device.
    Bill Snowden, Reass’ attorney from the Santa Fe public defender’s office, said the probation was achieved through a plea agreement.
    “Essentially, it was part of a plea that the DA (Kent Wahlquist) and I worked on,” Snowden said. “Part of the agreement was that she returns to where she was living out of state. If she didn’t leave, she was looking at more trouble.”
    Another reason for the probation was that Reass had already spent time in jail for her previous, driver-related offenses.
    On that night of Feb 16, Reass was arrested on a probation violation for a previous offense. Her blood alcohol level was too high for her to be admitted into the jail, so she was taken to the Los Alamos Medical Center for evaluation.
    While at the hospital, Reass apparently asked the officers if she could use the bathroom. She used the bathroom on at least two occasions.

  • McMillan talks lab in D.C.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory director Charlie McMillan was in Washington last week to testify before the Senate Armed Services Committee Subcommittee on Strategic Forces.
    McMillan provided an update on recent Los Alamos technical and scientific achievements; the proposed plutonium strategy under evaluation in numerous national security circles; and, Los Alamos budget realities that pose challenges to meeting our mission requirements.
    The following came from the Senate website and this was McMillan’s written testimony to the subcommittee.
    McMillan first talked about the lab’s accomplishments in the past year.
    “In regard to our weapons program, we again completed, on time, my letter to the Secretaries of Energy and Defense regarding the 2013 Annual Assessment. We successfully conducted two B61 hydrodynamic shots, which were executed as planned and within committed budget levels,” McMillan wrote.
    “Los Alamos executed the important subcritical experimental series, Gemini, and I am pleased that the FY15 request recognizes this success by including an increase for the Los Alamos subcritical experiments at Nevada.”

  • Sanchez to visit LA, May 1

    On Thursday, May 1, Lt. Governor John Sanchez will visit Los Alamos to meet with local leaders and hold constituent meetings with citizens.
    After meeting will members and staff from the County Council, he will meet with constituents from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Mesa Library (no appointment necessary).
    Sanchez will be available to personally meet with constituents and his staff will be prepared to provide assistance with all issues related to state government. No appointments are necessary.
     

  • LANL physicist wins E.O. Lawrence Award

     

    Los Alamos National Laboratory physicist John Sarrao is being honored by the U.S. Department of Energy with the 2013 Ernest O. Lawrence Award in Condensed Matter and Materials Sciences.

    "John Sarrao's exciting advances in actinide studies exemplify the quality of research performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory,” said Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Charlie McMillan.

    “Actinides, including plutonium, are among the most complex elements and involved in the most complex compounds known to man. Their understanding is fundamental to the Los Alamos core weapons mission and a major challenge in the worldwide condensed-matter and materials communities. John's contributions have fundamentally advanced our understanding in BOTH of these areas,” he said.

  • Crews rescue 12-year-old in the Jemez Mountains

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Authorities say a 12-year-old boy who fell off a cliff while hiking in the Jemez Mountains has been rescued.
    Sandoval County Sheriff’s officials say the boy was hiking with his father and friends about 20 miles north of San Ysidro on Tuesday morning.
    KOB-TV reports that the young hikers got separated from the adult and the boy fell off a 30-foot cliff.
    Paramedics located the boy and moved him slowly to safety due to the serious nature of his injuries.
    A medical helicopter transported the boy to UNM Hospital.
    Sheriff’s officials say the boy is listed in stable condition.
    His name hasn’t been released.

  • Be There 04-16-14

    Today
    Monthly FAN Club (Food and Networking after-hours) on historic Bathtub Row. The Los Alamos Historical Society is hosting, with catering provided by Peggy Pendergast. Parking available at the Senior Center, Fuller Lodge or library lots. Meeting will be about the Historical Society’s plans for the house and more about plans in advance of a Manhattan Project National Historic Park designation, and there will be plenty of time for networking. 5:30-7 p.m. at Bethe House, 1350 Bathtub Row. All Chamber members and potential Chamber members are invited. Free.

    The Juvenile Justice Advisory Board’s next meeting will be 6 p.m. in Building No. 1, Camino Entrada Road, Pajarito Cliffs Site. Bernadette Lauritzen will give an update on the Assets in Action program. The public is welcome to attend.

  • A rare glimpse of Antarctica

    Last November, Los Alamos Stephen Becker embarked on the National Geographic Explorer ship to the Falkland Islands, South Georgia Island and Antarctica. During this voyage, the “National Geographic” photographers produced a 50-minute video showing some of the trip highlights. Becker will show the video, and talk about the trip in a 7 p.m. program Thursday at the Pajarito Environmental Education Center. This event is free to attend and no advance registration is required. For more information about this and other events at PEEC, visit PajaritoEEC.org, email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org, or by call 662-0460.

  • Community events helps needy children in Uganda

    Blanca Jones of Los Alamos is eager to share the developments of the 2013 Los Alamos Soccer Collection Drive for the Children of Uganda she organized. She will share the question posed to her that began the collection drive, from which 23 boxes of soccer supplies were collected.
    The public community event, “Hearts for Uganda,” is being hosted by Jones and will be from 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. May 17 at Crossroads Bible Church, 97 East Road.
    Music will be provided by the internationally known Ugandan Watoto Children’s Choir and the guest speaker will be Mark Hallamore, a youth pastor at Community of Joy Church in Rio Rancho who will have just returned from his latest visit to Soroti.
    Available for purchase will be African jewelry, handmade by the women of Soroti, as a fundraiser with proceeds going directly back to their villages through Aica Ministries and the Soroti Eagles Soccer Academy. 

  • Transparency: Easy to say, harder to do

    Transparency is hard. Just ask the governor, who is now learning, as her predecessors did, that one of the sacrifices of her job is privacy.
    In the latest skirmish of the transparency wars, Gov. Susana Martinez called out a Democratic lawmaker for using a legislative agency to dig dirt on a political opponent.
    Some perspective: The Slurpy hit the fan last month after the governor tried to restrict the Legislature’s two biggest watchdogs, the Legislative Finance Committee and the Legislative Education Study Committee, by requiring them to go through her chief of staff for information. A torrent of criticism from the media and both parties forced the governor to uncuff the committees.
    This happened just after Sunshine Week, a media event that reminds elected officials to keep their cards on the table and their decisions out in the open.
    Coverage of this controversy was interesting. The Albuquerque Journal, which has been so blatantly pro-Martinez as to sacrifice its credibility, blasted the administration for this move. Even red-county newspapers have noted the long fall from grace of the governor who campaigned on transparency. (To be fair, the Legislature has its own transparency blind spots, but that’s another column.)
    We’re seeing more public records challenges.

  • Reining in all prom expenses

    If you’ve got teenagers, you already know how expensive high school can be. Besides food, clothing and school supplies, a whole host of extracurricular activities are competing for a share of your wallet — even as you frantically try to save for college and your own retirement.
    One of the biggest expenses you’ll encounter is prom. Gone are the days of borrowing dad’s suit and crepe paper streamers in the school gym: Today’s proms are often more like a Hollywood premiere with limousines, designer gowns and swanky after-parties.
    I’m not kidding. According to a recent nationwide survey conducted by Visa Inc., the average U.S. family with a high school student attending the prom expects to spend $978 this year. Surprisingly, that’s down 14 percent from last year’s survey average of $1,139 per family.
    A few other interesting statistics the survey uncovered:
    • On average, parents plan to pay for about 56 percent of prom costs, with their kids picking up the remaining 44 percent.
    • Parents in lower income brackets (less than $50,000 a year) plan to spend an average of $733 — a considerable share of the family budget. Thankfully, that’s down significantly from last year’s $1,245 estimate.