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Today's News

  • The public needs to keep the press honest

    BY GREG WHITE
    Los Alamos Resident, Guest Editorial

  • Trading guns across the border

    BY BOB HAGAN
    Coffee on a Cold Morning

  • Council may attach sunset clause to utility rates

    A discussion between members of the Los Alamos County Board of Public Utilities about gas rate changes and a county council liaison may lead to the council requiring sunset clauses on all rate changes the Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities makes.
    County Council Liaison and Vice Council Chair Susan O’Leary told the board that the sunset clauses are necessary.
    By adding a sunset clause to a rate, it puts a set retirement date on the rate change.
    Board Chairman Jeff Johnson disagreed with O’Leary. Johnson said there are already mechanisms in place that allow council to review rate changes, therefore a sunset clause was not necessary.
    The points were made during a discussion about whether or not the board would consider adding a sunset clause to the most recent gas rate that was approved by county council on Sept. 27, 2016.
    The rate was passed without a sunset clause.
    DPU Manager Tim Glasco told the board the reason they rushed the last-minute council approval on Sept. 27 was because they were caught off guard.

  • Lecture features effects of bomb

    BY SAM LEDOUX
    Special to the Monitor

  • LAPS board weighs bleak budget for American Indian students

    A committee tasked with providing recommendations to the Los Alamos School Board to help the district’s American Indian population succeed academically agreed to scale back its efforts in light of decreased state funding.
    “There’s a bleak picture out there for the budget and I want to be realistic about that,” School Board President Jenny McCumber told the committee members. “While all of us really appreciate all the work that’s been done, I think we need to look realistically at how much we can afford.”
    The the LAPS Title VII Parent Advisory Committee made a presentation to the board Tuesday about some of its findings and what the district could do to help.
    Areas discussed included testing results and cultural issues. There are 116 American Indian students in the school system. On the 2016 PARCC math test, American Indians scored a little over 730 in math and reading, similar to how Hispanics in the district did. Other ethnic groups tracked in the study scored higher than Hispanics and Native Americans, with Asians scoring at 780 or above.

  • An interview with Ruth Tatter, co-founder of Los Alamos Museum of Art

    By Mandy Marksteiner

    Marksteiner:  How did you first come up with the idea for LAMOA?

    Tatter: My mother was living in a condo in Los Alamos and one of her neighbors was a gentleman who had an incredible art collection. He had been collecting for a long time and was looking for a place to put it.

    Los Alamos needs to have this place where these collections can go. There’s a scientific history here that has been well documented, but there's a cultural history that goes along with this of art and artists who've been here from the beginning.                                                                                                              

  • Scientists race to prevent wipeout of world's coral reefs

    SOUTH ARI ATOLL, Maldives (AP) — There were startling colors here just a year ago, a dazzling array of life beneath the waves. Now this Maldivian reef is dead, killed by the stress of rising ocean temperatures. What's left is a haunting expanse of gray, a scene repeated in reefs across the globe in what has fast become a full-blown ecological catastrophe.

    The world has lost roughly half its coral reefs in the last 30 years. Scientists are now scrambling to ensure that at least a fraction of these unique ecosystems survives beyond the next three decades. The health of the planet depends on it: Coral reefs support a quarter of all marine species, as well as half a billion people around the world.

    "This isn't something that's going to happen 100 years from now. We're losing them right now," said marine biologist Julia Baum of Canada's University of Victoria. "We're losing them really quickly, much more quickly than I think any of us ever could have imagined."

    Even if the world could halt global warming now, scientists still expect that more than 90 percent of corals will die by 2050. Without drastic intervention, we risk losing them all.

  • Panel delays vote on early childhood ed initiative

    By Andrew Oxford

    The New Mexican

     

    Most members of the Senate Rules Committee trickled out of a hearing Monday, scuttling a vote on a proposed constitutional amendment to expand funding for early childhood education.

    The lack of a quorum stalled House Joint Resolution 1 in the first of two committees it must clear before even reaching a vote of the full Senate before the legislative session ends at noon Saturday.

    A couple Republicans were in the room when the Rules Committee took up the proposal. But all four Republicans on the committee either left the hearing or never entered it. Two Democrats also were absent, so only five of the committee's 11 members remained as the debate wound to a close. A majority of a committee's members must be present for it to act on legislation.

    Without a quorum, the Rules Committee chairwoman, Sen. Linda Lopez, D-Albuquerque, adjourned the committee altogether.

    "We're at a standstill," she told the remaining members, all Democrats.

    One cosponsor accused the resolution's critics of leaving to avoid a vote rather than go on the record opposing the proposal.

    "They know a vote against this is a bad vote," said Rep. Javier Martinez, D-Albuquerque.

  • Reading bill dies quietly

    By Robert Nott
    The New Mexican

    For seven consecutive years, Gov. Susana Martinez has unsuccessfully pushed a bill to hold back thousands of third-graders who score below par on standardized reading tests.

    A pair of similar bills this year haven't even received a hearing before a legislative committee. And with just five days left in the 60-day legislative session, it is unlikely that they will.

    Democratic Rep. Stephanie Garcia Richard, chairwoman of the House Education Committee, said she didn't know whether the panel would have time to hear House Bill 114, introduced by Rep. Monica Youngblood, R-Albuquerque. But even if Garcia Richard's committee takes up the measure, it almost certainly would table it.

    "I am never going to support mandatory retention," said Garcia Richard, herself a teacher. "But I do support the intervention portions of that bill" to provide extra help to children who don't read well.

    Despite the fact that her committee is "all caught up" on legislative bills, Garcia Richard said, she wasn't sure where Youngblood's bill stood in terms of a hearing date.

  • Painter Ming Franz to teach two-day splash watercolor workshop this weekend

    Join Ming Franz, an International Artist Magazine's recent grand prize winner, will teach a splash color workshop at the Fuller Lodge Art Center this weekend.

    The class will be from 9:30 a.m.-4:40 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

    Beginning with ancient black-and-white splash, the class will evolve into marbling splash and then abstract splash using liquid watercolor, acrylic, and Asian ink.

    The foundation of this painting process is based on principles originating in Tang Dynasty China with a technique, known as PoMo. Essentially the artist freely "splashes" liquid color onto stacks of dampened sheets of mulberry paper. After the sheets dry, they are separated and the real magic begins.