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Today's News

  • LAMS wrestling has another strong showing

    The Los Alamos Middle School Hawks wrestling team went down to Los Lunas for another Dual Tournament this past weekend, advancing to the finals before falling to Los Lunas Middle School.

    The Hawks were seeded in a pool with Valencia Middle School, and Academy Middle School. In the team’s first match against Valencia, the Hawks earned a decisive victory, by a score of 118-38.

    The Hawks went into the next match against Academy, also winners in the first round. Academy was no match against the Hawks, losing 104-6. That win moved the Los Alamos into the semi-finals against Rio Rancho. The Hawks took down Rio Rancho easily with a score of 90-21.

    That win took the team into the finals against Los Lunas. It was a tough match between the longtime rivals.

    Los Alamos was on top of Los Lunas by the end of wrestling 56-45. However, the Hawks had to give up 18 points in forfeits, costing the team first place by a score of 63-56, taking second overall.
     

  • LAHS downed by Santa Fe High

    Heading into this season, the main concern surrounding the Los Alamos High School girls’ basketball team was its inexperience. With just three seniors on the roster, it was inevitable that girls without much varsity experience would be thrust into important roles.

    Tuesday night against Santa Fe High School, the growing pains of the young Hilltoppers were on full display, as LAHS fell 46-35 partially due to an offense still searching for its identity.

    Heading into the game, it appeared the Hilltoppers had a bit of momentum. In its previous game, LAHS defeated Valencia High School on the road 54-52, after being down by six points at halftime.

    It also appeared that the Hilltoppers were catching Santa Fe High at the right time, as new head coach Cindy Roybal struggled through her first few games leading the Demonettes, with a 1-3 record.

    Early on, however, it was clear that Santa Fe High came into the matchup with the Hilltoppers ready to go, and firing on all cylinders.

    In this game, LAHS head coach Josh Archuleta inserted senior Katey Green into the starting lineup for junior Alix Hailey.

    Just 90 seconds into the game, Green had to be removed after picking up two quick personal fouls. This seemed to disrupt the offensive flow and put the Hilltoppers in an early hole.

  • Throwing money at The Wall is pointless

    New Mexico’s border crossing at Columbus small but brisk.

    Tiny Columbus’s claim to fame is Pancho Villa’s raid in 1916, commemorated by a state park. Snowbirds hunker down in the campground to spend a comfortable winter. The only shopping is a Dollar Store close to the international boundary.

    Across the border, the much larger Palomas gets a steady stream of Americans shopping at the Pink Store, getting dental work done or buying cheap over-the-counter drugs.

    Border guards on both sides are friendly and professional. The atmosphere is relaxed.

    You can’t visit the border without contemplating The Wall.

    The existing wall here of 18-foot steel columns is of fairly recent vintage. I try to imagine a new wall of the prototypes on display in California and envision a tourniquet that squeezes trade and relations between the two countries.

    In October the U. S. Customs and Border Protection unveiled eight giant rectangles made of concrete or composites. If you live in Ohio, you might believe a wall of this stuff will keep us safe and hold the hordes at bay.

  • LAFD personnel deployed to California wildfires

    For the third time in the past four months, personnel and equipment from the Los Alamos Fire Department were sent west to help battle wildfires in California.

    The LAFD’s Wildland Fire team has joined a task force of fire fighting agencies from New Mexico to work on the wildfires in California as of Thursday morning.

    Some wildfires there have scorched more than 100,000 acres this week near Ventura, Calif., and Los Angeles, fed by fierce Santa Ana winds and dry vegetation.

    LAFD Captain Tim Johnson, Driver Engineer Van Leimer and Firefighter Brian Palmer left Thursday morning in the fire department’s Brush 1, a Wildland Engine. Brush 1 is one of two county-owned wildland firefighting apparatus, according to a prepared statement by Wildland Division Chief Kelly Sterna.

  • New Mexico Legislature won't release harassment records

    SANTA FE (AP) — The New Mexico Legislature is declining to release records about two complaints of sexual harassment involving Statehouse maintenance staff.

    Legislative Council Service Director Raul Burciaga on Thursday said the documents are exempt from public disclosure under provisions of the state Inspection of Public Records Act regarding matters of opinion in personnel files.

    Legal representatives for the Legislature say there have been only two formal complaints of workplace harassment, in response to public records request about complaints dating back to January 2013. None involve lawmakers or lobbyists.

    It is unclear how the complaints were resolved.

    New Mexico lawmakers are preparing to rewrite anti-harassment policies for the Statehouse that were adopted in 2008.

    Female lobbyists and elected officials say sexual harassment goes unchecked in the Capitol amid ineffective complaint procedures.

  • Interior delays Obama-era regulation on methane emissions

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Interior Department said Thursday it is delaying an Obama-era regulation aimed at restricting harmful methane emissions from oil and gas production on federal lands.

    A rule being published in the Federal Register delays the methane regulation until January 2019, saying the previous rule is overly burdensome to industry. Officials said the delay will allow the federal Bureau of Land Management time to review the earlier rule while avoiding tens of millions of dollars in compliance costs to industry that may turn out to be unnecessary.

    The action marks at least the third time the Trump administration has moved to delay or set aside the Obama-era rule, which was imposed last year. The rule forces energy companies to capture methane that's burned off or "flared" at drilling sites because it pollutes the environment.

    An estimated $330 million a year in methane is wasted through leaks or intentional releases on federal lands, enough to power about 5 million homes a year.

    Methane, the primary component of natural gas, is a leading contributor to global warming. It is far more potent at trapping heat than carbon dioxide but does not stay in the air as long.

    A federal judge threw out an earlier bid to delay the rule.

  • House passes stopgap spending bill to avert weekend shutdown

    By ANDREW TAYLOR and ALAN FRAM, Associated Press

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The House on Thursday passed a stopgap spending bill to prevent a government shutdown this weekend and buy time for challenging talks on a wide range of unfinished business on Capitol Hill.

    The measure passed mostly along party lines, 235-193, and would keep the government running through Dec. 22. The Senate was expected to swiftly approve the measure as early as Thursday night and send it to President Donald Trump.

    The vote came as Trump and top congressional leaders in both parties huddled to discuss a range of unfinished bipartisan business on Capitol Hill, including the budget, a key children's health program and aid to hurricane-slammed Puerto Rico, Texas and Florida — and, for Democrats and many Republicans, protections for immigrants brought to the country illegally as children.

    "We are here to make progress. We have some important issues that we share with you," House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi told Trump at the White House, ticking off issues including the opioid crisis, funding for veterans and an expired children's health insurance program. "All things that have bipartisan support in the Congress."

    Trump relied, "That's very true."

  • Aztec shooting victims in thoughts, prayers of LAPS school officials

    The deadly shooting Thursday at a public school in the Four Corners is deeply troubling, said the Los Alamos Public Schools board and the superintendent.

    The shooting left three people dead – two students and the alleged – at Aztec High School in Aztec Thursday morning.

    “Our hearts go out to the victims and their families,” Superintendent Kurt Steinhaus and the LAPS school board said following a request from the Monitor for a statement.

    The victims, their families and the entire Aztec community are in their thoughts and prayers, they said in the prepared statement.

    They also wished to acknowledge the quick actions of the school staff and Aztec’s first responders.

    The eight Los Alamos schools are updating safety plans and conducting training sessions to educate staff and students in response to an active shooter or other safety threat, according to the statement.

    The district has been training with a standard response protocol called Lock Down, Lock Out Evacuate, and Shelter in Place. More details are available at a website: iloveuguys.org/srp.html.

  • Sheriff: 3 dead in New Mexico school shooting

    AZTEC, N.M. (AP) — A shooting at a New Mexico high school left two students and the suspect dead Thursday, authorities said as schools throughout the small town shut down for the day.

    Police did not release any details about the shooter but confirmed the other two people who were killed attended Aztec High School. No other injuries were reported, officials said.

    "The families of the victims were notified immediately. They are in our thoughts and prayers," state police said in a statement on social media.

    State and federal authorities are investigating what led to the shooting and did not immediately release any details about the circumstances. A news conference was planned.

    The school of about 900 students was cordoned off as authorities cleared the campus and teens were taken to another location.

    A crowd of nervous parents gathered outside City Hall in the moments after the shooting to wait for more information as officers tried to reassure them about the safety of their children.

    Despite the closure of all schools in Aztec, authorities said there were no other credible threats to students at the high school or other schools in the neighboring communities of Bloomfield or Farmington.

  • Hilltoppers win Bill Hudson Memorial Meet

    Divers compete well Friday evening

    The Bill Hudson Memorial Meet kicked off at the Larry R. Walkup Aquatic Center Friday evening, and the Hilltoppers immediately made their presence known.

    Of the 24 divers that participated, 11 were from Los Alamos High School, five boys and six girls.

    Four girls finished in the top five, led by Cyra Bishop, who was the runner-up. She finished with a score of 177.65.

    Also scoring well for the Hilltoppers were Anna Clark, who finished in third place with a score of 158.2.
    Emme Mooday was the fourth place finisher with a score of 157.75, and Bailey Nasise finished in fifth place with a score of 152.40.

    Addie Richie and Katie Wingo finished in seventh and eighth places, with scores of 143.25 and 141.35.

    The overall winner for the girls was Elianna Christienson from Farmington High School, who scored 206.2.

    The Hilltopper boys also performed well at the diving competition, with three boys finishing in the top five.
    LAHS’ top diver was Mychael Garcia, who ended up in third place with a score of 189.35.

    Kyle Hatler finished right behind him with a score of 178.5, and Griffin Stidham rounded out the top five with a score of 177.45.