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Today's News

  • Youth Activity Center gets remodeled

    The Youth Activity Center in Los Alamos, operated from the south side basement of the community building, is scheduled for remodeling starting mid-January. 

    Improvements include leveling the uneven floor and updating the near 30-year-old finishes.  

    After completion of improvements to the Teen Center, staff from the Los Alamos Family Council, operator of the YAC, requested improvements to the obsolete and deteriorated interior. With project savings from the Teen Center and others, this became possible.

    “We are fortunate that the Teen Center and other projects came in under budget,” said Los Alamos County Project Manager Steven Huebner.  “The floors were sloped with floor drains because this part of the building was originally a truck garage in the early days.”  

    The sloped portion of the concrete floor will be removed and replaced with a level floor to eliminate tripping hazards. 

    The space will be finished with concrete polished floors for longevity and easy cleaning. Cabinets and counter tops will be replaced, walls patched and painted, a sink added to the kitchenette, and the exit door will be updated to be a code-compliant fire exit.  

  • Redmond takes over reigns at Youth Activity Center

    John Redmond, the new director for the Los Alamos Family Council’s two Youth Activity Centers, has spent a significant part of his career working with young people. 

    Redmond served as school resource officer with the Los Alamos Police Department for five and a half years. He was assigned to the high school for most of that time, but also worked at the middle school. 

    Before joining the LAPD, Redmond provided leadership training for a Silicon Valley health tech company. Prior to that, he worked at St. John’s Military School, a boarding school for seventh- through 12th-grade boys in Salina, Kansas.

    As the school resource officer, Redmond was responsible for a variety of community outreach activities. He ran the first Safety Town, a program initiated by police Chief Dino Sgambellone. He also conducted a three-day Boy Scout public safety merit badge powwow, based on regional powwows he had taught, helping approximately 25 boys earn seven merit badges. 

    What Redmond enjoys most about working with youth is their energy. 

  • Reiss gives ‘State of the County’

    In his last act serving as Los Alamos County Council Chair, Rick Reiss presented a “State of the County” message at Tuesday’s council meeting. 

    A charter amendment approved by voters in 2014 calls for the council chair to give an annual State of the County address. Reiss is the first chair to act upon that directive. 

    Reiss described struggling with how to distinguish his message from the annual “State of the County” report given by County Manager Harry Burgess for the last five years. That report – presented at last Thursday’s Chamber breakfast – focused on the operational nuts and bolts, such as the status of county projects and finances.

    Reiss chose a high-level look at the county’s achievements. He opened his remarks with, 

    “I believe Los Alamos is a wonderful community with great amenities and beautiful surroundings. In summary, I believe the state of the county is “outstanding,” with excellent county staff that addresses the strategic goals of the council, operational excellence, which is the foundation of county government and comparable results that exceed our neighbors, the region and/or the state.”

  • Reiss gives ‘State of the County’

    In his last act serving as Los Alamos County Council Chair, Rick Reiss presented a “State of the County” message at Tuesday’s council meeting. 

    A charter amendment approved by voters in 2014 calls for the council chair to give an annual State of the County address. Reiss is the first chair to act upon that directive. 

    Reiss described struggling with how to distinguish his message from the annual “State of the County” report given by County Manager Harry Burgess for the last five years. That report – presented at last Thursday’s Chamber breakfast – focused on the operational nuts and bolts, such as the status of county projects and finances.

    Reiss chose a high-level look at the county’s achievements. He opened his remarks with, 

    “I believe Los Alamos is a wonderful community with great amenities and beautiful surroundings. In summary, I believe the state of the county is “outstanding,” with excellent county staff that addresses the strategic goals of the council, operational excellence, which is the foundation of county government and comparable results that exceed our neighbors, the region and/or the state.”

  • Real ID is a tough standard for some

    New Mexico is finally complying with the federal standard for Real ID.
    Real ID is the new form of driver’s license (or ID card for non-drivers) that will be required beginning in 2020 to board a plane and for other federal purposes. Real ID confirms that you are genuinely you to the satisfaction of the federal government. When you next renew your license, or no later than October 2020, to get a Real ID license, you will have to present several documents to the Motor Vehicle Department.
    New Mexico’s Legislature delayed several years before adopting this standard. After studying the requirements, I see why. Pulling together the necessary documents will probably be easy for most homeowners. It will be hard for some low-income people, especially those who don’t have a stable address.
    The details are on the MVD website at mvd.newmexico.gov/real-id-information.aspx.
    You’ll have to present three types of documents: one with your Social Security number, one that identifies you by age, and two that establish proof of residence.

  • LANL contract high on LA’s legislative priorities

    In December, the Los Alamos County Council approved a list of 2017 state legislative priorities. Efforts to support those priorities are already underway and will kick into high gear when the New Mexico State Legislature opens its session on Tuesday.
    Newly elected council Chair David Izraelevitz and County Manager Harry Burgess hold out little hope for council’s top legislative priority: legislation supporting the county’s application for capital outlay funding to develop affordable housing infrastructure.
    “We expect that there will be very little to no capital outlay given the current budget situation,” Izraelevitz said.
    “We’re hopeful. We have pressing needs, like many other communities around the state. But given the situation, we would be delighted if some of these things get addressed, but I think it’s going to be a very difficult argument to make, given all the cuts in just basic services that the state is looking to impose.”
    The county is taking a two-pronged approach to the second priority: adequate funding of local public health offices.
    The county has been protesting the New Mexico Department of Health’s decision to severely curtail both hours and services.

  • Court docs to go online

    The New Mexico Supreme Court announced its decision Jan. 6 to open up access to the public and others as part of a new policy.
    “The new policy is part of the Judiciary’s continuing efforts to make judicial proceedings more transparent and accessible to the public while balancing privacy concerns,” Communications Officer Barry Massey said. “The state courts recognize that people increasingly use and rely on electronic information in their day-to-day lives.”
    The New Mexico court system plans to have computer access operational by the spring or the summer. Access will first be  granted to attorneys licensed in New Mexico, out-of-state attorneys admitted by the New Mexico Supreme Court, state, municipal and federal law enforcement agencies, corrections agencies, federal state and municipal courts, compliance programs and agencies involved in adult, family or child welfare.

  • LANS earns DOE bonus for environmental management

    SANTA FE (AP) — Los Alamos National Security has received a $9.1 million bonus for reaching environmental goals in its operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    The New Mexican reports that the U.S. Energy Department says the contractor excelled in a number of projects to remediate areas of environmental concern during the fiscal year that ended Sept. 30. The company earned 90 percent of the maximum $10.1 million award.
    Decades of improper waste disposal have caused toxic and radiological contamination at the lab and are expected to cost nearly $4 billion to clean up over the next 25 years. The Department of Energy says in a report that the lab has made progress addressing an underground chemical plume that is creeping toward a major aquifer and in cleanup at Technical Area 21.

  • Celebrating over lunch
  • Burgess talks development

    Los Alamos County Manager Harry Burgess talked about economic development in his annual State of the County address Thursday to members of the Los Alamos Chamber of Commerce.
    Burgess took his remarks from the Los Alamos County 2016 Annual Report, which is available online at the county’s website.
    Some of the topics covered included tourism, quality of life and regional projects.
    First on his list was the county’s collaboration with the National Park Service to help get the Manhattan Project Historical Park off the ground. One of the things the county did to make the park more accessible was give space to the NPS for the park’s visitor center at 475 20th Street.
    The move allowed the park to start growing a base in Los Alamos, where visitors could orientate themselves to the park and what it has to offer.
    The county also worked with the NPS to ensure the Los Alamos part of the park was compatible to its other locations  in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and Hanford, Washington.
    “Over the cycle of that year, the park service has made great strides to make it a more permanent facility,” Burgess said. “They are taking baby steps to get to the point where the unit is in place not only here but in our sister cities as well.”