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Today's News

  • News for Retirees Sept. 18-Sept. 24

    Sept. 18-Sept. 24
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations: by 10 a.m. for lunches.
    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    9:45 a.m.        Matter of Balance Class
    10 a.m.        Senior Civic Discussion             Group
    10:30 a.m.        Advisory Council
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Chicken Pot Pie
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:30 a.m.        Mac Users Group
    8:45 a.m.         Variety Training
    10 a.m.        Computer Users Group
    11:30 a.m.         Lunch: Egg Salad
            Sandwich on Rye    
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge (Classroom)

  • Sign ups start now for Trick-or-Treat MainStreet

    Halloweekend will haunt downtown Los Alamos once again Oct. 28-29.
    Los Alamos MainStreet will host Trick-or-Treat on MainStreet Oct. 28 in downtown Los Alamos.
    Main Street and Central Avenue, from 15th to 20th Streets, will be closed to auto traffic and become a safe pedestrian area from 4-6:30 p.m., where local businesses and organizations distribute candy to costumed families.
    While businesses in the downtown area open their doors to the public, this is also an opportunity for businesses and organizations that are not located in the downtown area to be involved.
    Last year an estimated 4,000 people took part in the weekend’s festivities.
    Other activities Friday will include Trick-or-Treating at Los Alamos Medical Center from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. and High Tech Halloween at the Bradbury Science Museum from 4 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. The Pet Costume Parade will march down Central Avenue at 5:30 p.m., and the YMCA Costume Climb is set for 6-8 p.m.
    Halloweekend festivities will continue Oct. 29, beginning with pumpkin carving at the Smith’s Marketplace from 10 a.m. to noon.
    The Los Alamos Arts Council will host the Pumpkin Glow on the lawn at Fuller Lodge from 6-9 p.m.
    Los Alamos MainStreet will provide live entertainment inside Fuller Lodge from 6:30-9 p.m.

  • 13 LAHS students make 2017 Merit Scholarship program

    National Merit Scholarship Corporation announced last week the names of approximately 16,000 semifinalists in the 62nd annual National Merit Scholarship Program.  Los Alamos High School announced that 13 members of the Class of 2017 received the distinction.  
    The students are: Rose Click, Nicolas Dowdy, Megan Kornreich, Justin Lemke, Opale Shappert, Andrew Tang, Zephram Tripp, Darcy Turin, Jennifer Wang, Wilbur Wang, Michelle Yang and Robert Zhu.
    “We are very proud of our 2017 National Merit Semifinalists,” said Principal Brad Parker.  “These students are truly a positive reflection of what our school stands for, the dedication of our staff here at Los Alamos High School and the support of their parents, family and friends.”
    The seniors can continue in the competition for some 7,500 National Merit Scholarships, worth some $33 million that will be offered next spring. To be considered for a Merit Scholarship award, semifinalists must fulfill several requirements to advance to the finalist level.  About 90 percent of the semifinalists are expected to attain finalist standing, and more than half of the finalists will win a National Merit Scholarship, earning the Merit Scholar title.

  • Military Order of World Wars to meet Tuesday

    This month’s meeting of the Military Order of the World Wars will be at 6 p.m. Tuesday in the Los Alamos Research Park, in the second-floor conference room.
    Police Chief Dino Sgambellone will discuss current law-enforcement related topics to include crime statistics, gun safes in local schools and the School Resource Office Program, program efforts, the direction of the department including seeking National Accreditation, and any other topic of interest.
    The Los Alamos Research building is located west of the South Mesa Fire Station. Parking is available east of the fire station, or east of the Research Park building.
    The meeting will begin with a social period, followed by a brief business meeting and dinner at 6:25 p.m. The presentation will begin at about 7:15 p.m. Dinner meetings are open to interested citizens with RSVP, or the program only at no cost. Cost of the dinner is $25 per person. Call LTC Gregg Giesler, 662-5574 (email: g.gieslercomputer.org), or Eleanor Pinyan, 672-3750 (email: depinyan@cybermesa.com).

  • Is there a future for New Mexico ethanol?

    By BOB HAGAN

  • Museum staff shares stories of Japan

    The Los Alamos Historical Society (LAHS) kicked off its fall lecture series with “Culture Co-op” on Tuesday.
    The event centered around the museum’s new Los Alamos Japan project, initiated by Los Alamos History Museum (note the recently adopted name change) Director Judith Stauber.  
    “Los Alamos History Museum’s Japan Project seeks to inspire social change locally and globally by building a bridge of understanding between communities in Los Alamos, Hiroshima and Nagasaki,” Stauber told the Los Alamos Monitor.
    Stauber was inspired by the fact that “In the decades since the United States dropped the atomic bombs on Japan, scientists and educators in both countries have exchanged ideas and information, but these conversations have not been matched by significant cultural exchanges, despite the countries being allies.”
    That fact was brought home again and again throughout the evening, which included making origami cranes to send to the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum and the Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum and presentations about their trip by Stauber, museum Registrar Stephanie Yeamans and intern Kally Funk.
    Origami cranes were prevalent at the museums.

  • LAHS boy’s soccer downs Farmington in OT

    Facing the same opponent in a span of five days could’ve been trouble for the Los Alamos boy’s soccer team.
    But, after defeating Farmington 4-0 last Friday in Albuquerque, the Hilltoppers garnered their second win against the Scorpions in a 2-1 overtime thriller on Tuesday at Sullivan Field. It was the Hilltoppers second overtime win of the season.
    Both teams were knotted up 1-1 after 80 minutes of regulation. But, Los Alamos only needed one minute to clinch the overtime win.
    Moments after the overtime period began, the Hilltoppers earned a corner kick. Andreas Runde took the corner kick and delivered a low cross, as Ben Rees was able to get enough on the ball to put it past the Farmington goalkeeper for the Los Alamos game winner.    
    Tuesday’s match up was not only more competitive on the score line, but also on the field. Both teams had numerous opportunities to open the scoring but neither were able to open the scoring, as the first half ended 0-0.
    Farmington struck first in the 48th minute, after Yosmar Ruiz took it upon himself to get past the Los Alamos defense and give the Scorpions a 1-0 lead.
    In the 65th minute, Los Alamos looked to its leading goal scorer for the equalizer. Arthur Steinkamp found a loose ball in the box and scored his 11th goal of the season to tie it 1-1.

  • They’re coming home

    Every Los Alamos football team for the last 50 years has been trying to repeat what the 1966 Hilltoppers did.
    Fifty years ago, Los Alamos won its lone football state championship. The 1966 triumph is regarded as one of the premier moments in Hilltoppers history.
    Now, 23 members of the 1966 team are coming back to Los Alamos to celebrate the half-century anniversary of its state championship win. The 1966 team will participate in tonight’s Homecoming game festivities.
    “I’ve been working on organizing this reunion of our football team for the last couple years,” said Bob Russo, who was the starting quarterback of the 1966 team. “Trying to track down guys by telephone is extremely hard nowadays. I had to work through social media and friends of friends to reach all of our players. I’m real pleased that we were able to connect with so many of them.”
    The team will presented a half hour before kickoff tonight.
    “We’re all excited to be back on that football field one last time, where we were 50 years ago,” Russo said.
    Only five team members who will be present tonight still live in Los Alamos. The others traveled from out of town to reunite with former teammates.

  • More salaried workers may be eligible for overtime pay

    BY RANDY S. BARTELL & RANDI N. JOHNSON
    Montgomery & Andrews PA, Employment Law Group
    Finance New Mexico

  • State snubs economic development project in rural New Mexico

    Wonder why we’re poor? Here’s the type of thing that happens here.
    In 2014, the biggest thing in tourism and historic preservation was the purchase of the derelict Castañeda Hotel in Las Vegas by veteran developer Allan Affeldt, who successfully restored La Posada Hotel in Winslow, Arizona.
    The Castañeda, like much of Las Vegas, is a rundown remnant of yesteryear that’s been the object of hopes and what ifs. In 1898 it was Fred Harvey’s first hotel; it closed in 1948. This is a project only “an eccentric investor like me” would want, Affeldt says.
    In the hospitality business, you need a certain size to make the investment worthwhile.
    “The Castañeda was kind of an enticing project,” he says, but bathrooms are down the hall. To provide modern amenities, a restoration would reduce 45 rooms to 25. “It was hard to justify the investment given the size.”
    Also in 2014, Affeldt bought a second historic Las Vegas property, the Plaza Hotel, out of foreclosure. He made improvements and turned it around. (I stayed there before and after. His team worked wonders.)
    “I figured maybe by putting the two together, I could make it work,” he says. He needed New Markets Tax Credits and began negotiating with the New Mexico Finance Authority.