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Today's News

  • Art center exhibit highlights fiber arts

    Valentina Devine loves fiber.
    She loves dying yarn. She loves creating fabulous free-form wearable art combining knitting and crochet, yarns and fabric scraps, old lace and even old clothing. She loves teaching others to leave behind the constraints of knitting only in rows; to capture a freedom of motion in their pieces. She loves the delight of her customers when they walk away wearing a new Valentina design.
    And she loves telling stories about her life as a fabric artist.
    Devine’s solo exhibition “Knit One, Crochet Two” will have an opening reception Friday from 5-7 p.m. The show will be on display until March 21.
    When planning the show, Devine said, “My medium is fiber. Any kind of fiber. Yarn, fabric, ribbon, twine, and sometimes even wire. Anything I can get on a knitting needle or through a crochet hook will work for me. My vision is to fill the gallery with many different items, which are all hand knitted and/or crocheted. I will fill this gallery with interesting pieces and show the public that using fiber in any form can be exciting and rewarding.”
    Devine said the exhibit lives up to her vision. In one area, labeled “Not Arsenic but Old Lace,” there is an array of pieces incorporating all kinds of vintage lace.

  • Consider a minor’s circumstances before changing parental notification

    Parental notification on abortion, an issue I hoped had been put to rest years ago, is back with New Mexico, thanks to House Bill 391, sponsored by Rep. Alonzo Baldonado, R-Valencia.
    The bill requires that if a minor is seeking an abortion, her parents must be notified first. The requirement is notice, not consent.
    The bill provides exceptions, including so-called judicial bypass — a way for the minor to get approval from a judge instead of her parents in certain circumstances. It also requires statistical reporting by all doctors who perform abortions (not limited to minors) — a provision that might be seen as a prelude to more restrictive legislation.
    Should the law require girls under the age of consent — or the healthcare providers who want to help them — to notify parents before they can get an abortion? This question is not just about abortion. It’s about parenting and the precious protective relationship between parents and children.
    Except sometimes the relationship is not protective.
    How you react to this question depends on the point of view you take when you think about it. Some people take the issue personally. They relate the legislation to their own children, grandchildren, relatives or other favorite kids.

  • Things parents should know about PARCC testing

    Los Alamos Public Schools will soon begin testing students in third through 11th grade on the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Career (PARCC). This will mark the first year this test has been administered in our community.
    The purpose of the assessment is to help determine our students’ understanding of the Common Core State Standards in reading, language arts and mathematics, as well as provide data about our students’ college and career readiness. For example, a fifth grade student who demonstrates proficiency on the PARCC assessment is viewed as on a path to college and career ready.
    In the past, the annual assessment was known as the New Mexico Standards Based Assessment (SBA), which was administered over a two-week testing window.
    In contrast to SBA that students took in the past, the PARCC will be taken online. Students in Chamisa and Mountain Elementary Schools will be the first to participate in the PARCC testing. Other schools in the district will soon follow.
    PARCC will be administered in two phases. As such, students in grades 3-11 will be assessed in three tests in English Language Arts and two tests in mathematics in March. In April, students in grades 3-11 will take two end-of-year tests in English Language Arts and two end-of-year in mathematics.

  • Today in history Feb. 26
  • NWS issues video forecast on return of winter storm

    The National Weather Service has posted a web video on the forecast for the next few days, with the possibility of winter storms returning to New Mexico. The video can be viewed at http://www.srh.noaa.gov/abq/?n=specialwebbriefing

  • Be There calendar 2-25-15

    Today
    Geology & Minerals for Kids – Second Session. 1-3 p.m. Geologist Patrick Rowe will hold a special two-part workshop for kids. During the second session, Rowe will go into more detail about how each kind of rock is formed and where it can be found. $20/$16 PEEC members for one session. Registration required. For more information and to register, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org.

    First Born Program of Los Alamos launching celebration. A home visitation non-profit organization that supports child development for children ages 0-3 years of age. 5-7 p.m. at Bridge Care for Women, 3500 Trinity Dr.

    The first meeting of the Los Alamos Public Schools 2015 Budget Committee. 5-6:30 p.m. at the high school Speech Theater.

    Game Night: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. every Wednesday at the Mesa Public Library in the Upstairs Rotunda.

    The Paintings of Francis Harlow: Portraits & Pottery. Ongoing through February at the Los Alamos History Museum.
    Thursday

  • Community briefs 2-25-15

    Applications available for cancer retreat

    Applications are available now for the spring 2015 Family Cancer Retreat. The free educational program provides New Mexico’s adult cancer patients/survivors and their loved ones with tools to better manage the disease, treatment and recovery process. The retreat is scheduled for April 17-19 and will be at the Marriott Pyramid North hotel in Albuquerque.
    More than 300 people from more than 125 New Mexican families coping with cancer are expected to participate, making this the largest general cancer education program in New Mexico and the largest program of its type in the United States. Space is limited, so early registration is encouraged.
    The program will combine discussions and lectures by many of New Mexico’s leading cancer specialists with fun activities that provide a break from the day-to-day challenges of living with cancer.

  • Teachers at the Roundhouse

    Many Los Alamos teachers came to show support of what they believe is the course the state needs to take to help students. Rep. Stephanie Garcia Richard (D-43) spoke to the crowd of more than 600 people during the rally earlier this month.

  • Co-op celebrates four years in business

    The Los Alamos Co-op Market is celebrating its fourth anniversary Saturday by offering fun learning experiences for all ages, live music, food sampling, cake and semi-annual Inventory Reduction Sale.
    Celebrate community while enjoying interactive booths by a variety of nonprofit organizations including the New Mexico State University County Extension, Camino de Paz, the Family YMCA, and Pajarito Environmental Education Center.
    To show appreciation for the co-op’s member/owners, the co-op is offering a 10 percent discount on all regular priced items.
    The co-op will have activities for all ages this weekend:
    • All Day:  Member/owners save 10 percent on regular priced items
    • Start of the member/owner Drive
    • Free gift for new, renewed or upgraded member/owners
    •  Free food and wellness samples
    • 9 a.m.: Local singer/guitarist Dana Smith
    • 10 a.m.:  Shrubs & Switchels (vinegar drinks) by the NMSU County Extension
    • Chair massages by Angela Love-Storkan
    • 11 a.m.:  Bouncy House provided by Little Forest Playschool
    • “I love my Co-op because…” photo shoot
    • Learning on a cellular level by Camino de Paz
    • Environmental fun by PEEC

  • White House says NCLB veto to come

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House threatened Wednesday to veto a Republican bill to overhaul the widely criticized No Child Left Behind law, calling the effort “a significant step backwards.” The veto threat came as lawmakers were set to debate the measure in the House.
    Republicans say the bill would restore local control in schools and stop top-down education mandates. Democrats say it would allow billions in federal dollars to flow out without ensuring they will improve student learning.
    The White House said the bill “abdicates the historic federal role in elementary and secondary education of ensuring the educational progress of all of America’s students, including students from low-income families, students with disabilities, English learners, and students of color.”
    The White House statement was the latest in a series of veto threats issued by President Barack Obama since both chambers of Congress went under Republican control last month.
    A vote is expected on Friday, and it’s possible that members will vote strictly along party lines. That’s what happened with a similar bill in 2013.
    House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, called the education measure “a good conservative bill that empowers America and does not empower the bureaucracy here in Washington.”