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Today's News

  • Another enjoyable Mozart piece

    With his wealth of compositions, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is one of the most favored composers in Western music, and well-liked at The Santa Fe Opera. This year they are presenting an earlier work of Mozart’s, “La Finta Giardiniera.” This opera, with its unrealistic plot, is enjoyable, no matter how nonsensical the action on the stage seems. Mozart’s music is so agreeable that it renders weaknesses in the storyline irrelevant.
    The orchestra is, as usual, fantastic, as is the conductor, Harry Bicket. Bicket is also very pleasing to watch. It sounds as though this bouncy, energetic score derives some panache from the man with the baton.
    The set is exactly what one would expect for a Mozart piece — however, this doesn’t mean it’s boring. Audience members can settle in their seats and view the extraordinary Santa Fe sunset happening in the background, making each performance unique. The costumes, as well, are fairly typical, but again, not in the least boring. The Podestà looks magnificent, as does his niece, Arminda.
    Even the plain black clothing in which the servants are dressed is beautifully tailored, and the colors and fabrics provide a wonderful visual balance with the stage.

  • Be There calendar 7-30-15

    Today
    Downtown Dogs is a weekly walking group. All dogs and their humans are invited to walk from Pet Pangaea, 158 Central Park Square for a stroll around Downtown Los Alamos. 7 p.m. Come prepared with a standard leash, no longer than 6 feet.

    Swing dancing. 7 p.m. at Sheriff’s Posse Lodge, 650 North Mesa Road. $3-$5. For more information, email AtomicCitySwing@gmail.com.

    (This) Ability: Trisha Ebbert. Through Saturday at the Portal Gallery.
    Friday
    Gentle Hikes with PEEC. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. 8:30 a.m. Free. Adults. Meet at the Nature Center and carpool to the trailhead. For more information, losalamosnature.org.

    Quiet, Gentle Walks. Join Sue Watts for a gentle walk along a relatively flat trail. The walks range from 1-2 miles and may include gentle changes in elevation.  Each walk includes 20 minutes of silent walking. Free. Meets every Friday at 8:30 a.m. at the Nature Center. Check peecnature.org for any changes.

  • UNM-LA summer program for youth a huge success

    “Best Summer Camp Ever!!! Wish it lasted longer,” wrote one young participant on a survey after the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos Summer Program for Youth wrapped up in mid-July.
    Offering five days of afternoon classes on chemistry in the kitchen, robotics and university explorations, the Youth College program, geared toward kids entering grades 4-6, boasted 51 participants. “I learned a lot that I hadn’t known before...This camp was awesome!” shared another participant.
    For students entering grades 1-3, Children’s College presented Adventures at the University, an exploration of various STEM topics and included astronomy, chemistry, nutrition and art activities indoors and outdoors.
    “It encouraged me to be a chemist when I grow up,” wrote one of the 18 kids in the program.
    Parents were pleased with the kids’ progress in the course, as well, and one wrote, “The camp was a good way to get the children’s minds going during summer ... my child had so much to say after every class about what he learned for the day.”
    Other classes that the kids participated in were game design, cartooning and digital movie making, and some exciting new offerings this year include biotechnology and engineering.

  • A Stuffed Animal Night Out

    Earlier this month, the Mesa Public Library hosted the annual Stuffed Animal Sleepover. Children dropped their plush at the library overnight and picked them up in the morning. The “animals” had a fun-filled night with the library staff.
    In the morning the children returned to pick up their animals. Youth Services Director Angie Manfredi read a storybook with the kids and treated them to juice and donuts, followed by a slideshow of the stuffed animals adventures at the library, which had the children rolling with laughter.
    One of the organizers Melissa Mackey said the library staff and student volunteers worked hard to put together the event. Special thanks to staff members Chelsea Wilson and Elly Olivas and students Dillon Barnes and Jared Tapia.
    A digital photo frame of the slideshow is featured on the library’s Facebook page.
    The purpose of the event was to show youth that there is all kinds of fun to be had to the local library.

  • Sage Cottage open house is Saturday

    Sage Cottage Montessori invites the community to an open house from 3-5 p.m. Saturday.
    Director Sandra Sorensen took over when the former owner Cheri Host passed away from ovarian cancer.
    Sorensen began as a classroom educator and sees the love her staff has for watching those in their charge grow.
     “They are wonderful, loving caring teachers who are always looking out for the best interest of the children and being sure to treat them as individuals,” Sorensen said. “Our core staff has worked at Sage Cottage for over six years.”
    Sage is a 4-star school that works hard to maintain its rating through a variety of educational opportunities for their students. The school caters to families with children ranging in age from 6 weeks to 5 years old.
    Sage Cottage offers a great teacher to student ratio, which includes a librarian, music teacher and special monthly science activities in addition to their daily science lessons.
    “We use zoo-phonics at Sage Cottage, to teach language, Montessori and science-based play,” Sorensen said. “We also have Las Cumbres services for a variety of services and an inclusion specialist at our disposal.”
    Sorensen is a married mother of two grown children and one grandchild.

  • Businesses find evolutionary path to profitability

    One obstacle to improvement in a typical American company is the assumption that change requires months of planning, major expense and a work stoppage or slowdown. Then there’s the fear that old habits and practices will slowly return as people forget what they learned amid the pressures and demands of running a business.  
    Even when the need for change is obvious, such companies often resist fixing something until it’s utterly broken.
    An alternative, nonreactive view embraces change as a continual process of incremental improvements and tweaks — not as an exercise in obsessive compulsion but as an adaptive approach to reducing waste-related costs, eliminating inefficiencies and optimizing competitiveness.
    That perspective is the Japanese system of kaizen.
    Change is good
    As the Japanese rebuilt their economy from scratch after World War II, they invested heavily in their manufacturing and banking sectors and in the education and training of a disciplined, sophisticated and technically savvy workforce. Their manufacturing sector became so efficient that it challenged America’s status as the world’s largest economy in the 1980s.

  • The dam that never got built

    There might have been a dam, a mile and a-half of stored water and a new chance at sustainability — though “sustainability” was not in our vocabulary then — with thriving truck gardens, lush orchards and a much greener valley.
    Or something else entirely. It depends whom you believed.
    Indian Camp Dam is the dam that never was. Seeing the current conflict over a proposed dam in the Gila, I looked back at the stories I wrote in the mid-1970s, when Indian Camp Dam was the dominant controversy in Taos.
    Years earlier, led by U.S. Sen. Dennis Chavez, Congress passed a law creating the San Juan-Chama project.
    The project diverted water from the San Juan River, a tributary of the Colorado, across the Continental Divide into the Chama River, from which it flows into the Rio Grande.
    The Chama joins the Rio Grande near Española. Communities farther north did not have access to that water, so the legislation authorized a dam to be built in Taos County.
    The dam was to be sited in the foothills upstream from Ranchos de Taos, along the Rio Grande del Rancho, the stream that runs near the famous St. Francis Church.

  • Today in history July 30
  • Gray, Wheeler lead ’Topes past Bees

    The Albuquerque Isotopes (48-57) beat the Salt Lake Bees (41-64) 4-1 Wednesday night at Isotopes Park. Right-handed pitcher Jon Gray pitched five scoreless innings, while outfielder Tim Wheeler picked up thee RBI.
    Albuquerque wasted no time jumping out front with a two-RBI single by Wheeler in the second inning.
    The Isotopes added another run in the sixth on Wheeler’s second RBI single.
    The Bees managed to scratch across a run in the top of the seventh, but infielder Trevor Story quickly answered with a monstrous solo home run in the home half of the inning.
    Gray struck out eight, walked one and only gave up three hits in the win,
    Matt McBride made his first start since being activated from the disabled list on Tuesday and promptly extended the team’s season-longest hitting streak to 18 games with a single in the first inning.
    The outfielder finished Wednesday evening 3-for-3 with three singles and a walk. Having spent 20 days on the disabled list, McBride’s 18-game hitting streak began way back on June 16.
     

  • Mountain bike races coming to LA

    Over the next two weekends, Los Alamos will be New Mexico’s hub for mountain bike racing.
    On Sunday, the New Mexico Off Road Series will come to town for the PyroClassic cross-country race.
    The following weekend, Aug. 8-9, the New Mexico Enduro Cup Series will bring racers to town for the Los Alamos Rock ‘n’ Roll EnduroFest.
    It will be both races second go round and the EnduroFest’s first year as part of New Mexico’s Enduro Cup.
    The PyroClassic, hosted by the Pajarito Mountain Bike Patrol, will take place at the Valles Caldera National Preserve.
    There will be three different distances that bikers will ride, winding through valley meadows and climbing over the flanks of the volcanic upheaval of the 11,000-foot Redondo Peak.
    Pros, Cat 1 and singlespeed racers will pedal 30 miles in a loop around Redondo Peak and Alamo Canyon. Climbing on the loop will be substantial with a total ascent of over 2,400 feet.
    Cat 2 riders will race on an 18-mile route while Cat 3 bikers will do a nine-mile loop.
    All races start and finish near the Valles Caldera Ranch headquarters.
    The last day to register online for the PyroClassic is Friday. There will be no race-day registration. Participants will also need a USAC license.