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Today's News

  • The New Digs

    The new Los Alamos Teen Center was unveiled Monday. The Teen Center, for high school-aged students in the county, features games, a big screen TV and a computer lounge for those looking for a place to relax. The new area is located on the upper floor of the Community Building, by Ashley Pond. It had been hosted for the past several years at the Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church.

  • July was wet, cool in county

    The wet spring and summer, that started in May, continued all the way through July, according to researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Rainfall was well above average in July according to the lab’s measurements. In Los Alamos, average rainfall was nearly double what happens during the month, with the townsite recording 6.68 inches.
    At least one weather record, that has stood for 44 years, was broken on July 20, when Los Alamos received 1.44 inches of rain, far and away the most it had ever gotten on that particular day — the previous record was .95 inches set in 1971.
    LANL said that through the month Los Alamos has received nearly 15.5 inches of rain this year, which is the most total rainfall since 1949 and more than 5.5 inches above normal.
    David Bruggerman, a meteorologist with LANL, said the Climate Prediction Center is expecting above-average rainfall through October.
    Neither Los Alamos nor White Rock were as warm last month, however, breaking a trend of warm weather seen in June.
    In the first half of July, the mean maximum temperature was 3.1 degrees below average and White Rock was 4.4 degrees below average.
    Lower temperatures were also expected by the Climate Prediction Center through the rest of the summer and early fall.

  • Scorpions prevail in girls soccer opener

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper girls soccer team fell behind near halftime of Saturday’s opening game of the season as it struggled to generate offense.
    Los Alamos took on the Farmington Scorpions in the first game of 2015 for any sport at the high school. Farmington, which sports one of the most seasoned rosters of any team in Class 5A, didn’t light things up, either, but set itself up with enough chances to stay on top.
    Hannah Kelley of Farmington came through with goals late in the first half and early in the second half to help the Scorpions score a 3-1 win at Sullivan Field.
    Kelley took advantage of a miscue late in the half, while another Hilltopper miscue would lead to a big insurance goal after Los Alamos had worked its way back to within striking distance midway through the second half.
    Los Alamos forward Sienna Ahlers scored at the 57-minute mark. Ahlers, who will be charged with the task of shoring up a front line that lost its primary weapon, Catie McDonald, over the offseason, blew through the Farmington defense on a charge down the left hashmark.
    Ahlers found daylight between three converging Farmington defenders and went to the near post against Bailey Carter for the first Los Alamos score of the season.

  • Today in history Aug. 25
  • Entrance fee waived Tuesday at Bandelier

    There will be no entrance fee to Bandelier National Monument, or any other national park or monument, all day Tuesday.

    Bandelier is waiving the entrance fee as part of the National Park Service Founders Day. The NPS is turning 99 years old on Tuesday.

    For more information, call Bandelier National Monument at 672-3861.

  • Stocks slump; Dow ends down 588 after early 1,000-pt. slide

    U.S. stocks slid again Monday, with the Dow Jones industrial average briefly plunging more than 1,000 points in a sell-off that sent a shiver of fear from Wall Street to Main Street.

    Stocks regained some of that ground as the day wore on, but the Dow finished with a loss of 588 points, the eighth-worst single-day point decline and the second straight fall of more than 500.

    The slump — part of a global wave of selling touched off by signs of a slowdown in China — triggered worries among Wall Street professionals and among ordinary Americans who have been saving for retirement or a down payment on a house.

    With the lease on her car up, health insurance worker Deirdre Ralph of Wayne, New Jersey, had planned to get a less pricey vehicle and invest the savings. Now she's having doubts.

    "That money, I wanted to take and put it toward my retirement," said Ralph, 61. "Should I? Or should I just have a great old time?"

    The Standard & Poor's 500 index also fell sharply shortly after the opening bell, entering "correction" territory — Wall Street jargon for a drop of 10 percent or more from a recent peak. The last market correction was nearly four years ago.

  • Today in history Aug. 24
  • Game of the week, Aug. 23-29

    The 19th edition of the Louie Cernicek boys’ soccer tournament will feature eight competitive teams here at Sullivan Field.
    In addition to Los Alamos, the bracket includes Clovis, Piedra Vista, Roswell, Goddard, Farmington, Santa Fe Prep and Bosque Prep.
    To get to the top, Los Alamos will first need to win its opening-round game.
    Los Alamos will kick off its home tournament at 9 a.m. Friday against Clovis.
    The tournament’s championship game is scheduled for 6 p.m. on Saturday.
     

  • BPU calls meeting on nuclear energy project

    The Los Alamos Board of Public Utilities (BPU) will hold a special session at 2:30 p.m. Monday in council chambers to decide whether to approve $145,540 for the Carbon Free Power Project Study Phase Siting Agreement with the Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems (UAMPS).
    The item was tabled at the board’s Aug. 17 meeting. Only three of the five board members were in attendance after a phone connection to Paul Frederickson was dropped and could not be retrieved. Chair Andrew Fraser was not present. Vice Chair Stephen McLin chaired the meeting.
    The Department of Public Utilities (DPU) has been exploring the option to buy into the proposed 600MW small modular reactor (SMR) facility as a possible replacement for base load power from the county’s coal assets as early as 2022.
    The facility would house up to 12 NuScale nuclear power modules.
    According to Deputy Utilities Manager for Power Supply Steve Cummins, the 1984 Los Alamos Power Pool’s (LAPP) Power Supply Study recommended investigating small-scale nuclear as a coal replacement. The Future Energy Resources Committee had a similar recommendation.

  • Foster’s attorneys seek documents

    Attorneys representing clients being subpoenaed by the attorneys representing former Los Alamos Police Commander Randy Foster met again in district court last week.
    This time, the issue was whether Foster’s attorneys can compel a psychologist who was treating former officer Brian Schamber to hand over documents related to his treatment for trial.
    In his argument against handing over the documents, David Berlin, an attorney representing psychologist Bradford Richards, referenced a court decision that successfully prevented another doctor from handing over documents in a similar case.
    “...It’s to protect confidential communications made during treatment of a patient’s mental or emotional condition from disclosure during court proceedings, the precise thing the plaintiff is trying to do now, is what this rule was sought to prevent,” said Berlin in district court Tuesday. Berlin also used other legal arguments in other cases to further his argument.
    Judge Raymond Ortiz however said that in this case, the consultation given the nature of the circumstances, was “quasi public” and so release of the documents should be considered.