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Today's News

  • LAHS girl's soccer loses tourney title after controversial call

    AZTEC — It wasn’t the ending that the Los Alamos girl’s soccer team wanted, but the Hilltoppers gained some assurance going forward from the season’s opening weekend.
    After opening the 2016 season with two wins, Los Alamos lost to Aztec 1-0 in double overtime in the Aztec Tournament championship game Saturday.
    Aztec was awarded a penalty kick halfway through the second overtime. And the Tigers’ Grace Olson converted the game-winning penalty kick.
    Los Alamos coach Gary Ahlers disagreed with the official’s decision to award Aztec a penalty kick. Ahlers said both the central and assistant referees claimed that a Los Alamos player pushed an Aztec player after Los Alamos goalkeeper Anna Lemke made a play on the ball.      
    “It happened to be that an official thought he saw something that didn’t happen,” Ahlers said. “He took 90-plus minutes of play out the window. You officiate the game, not determine it. This official determined the game by guessing on a play.”
    Ahlers said he reviewed the film after the game and said he remained confused as to why the officials called a foul on one of his players.

  • Pursuit to state begins Tuesday for LAHS boy's soccer

    The Los Alamos boy’s soccer program always goes into a season as state title contenders, but this season the target on the Hilltoppers’ back might be bigger after last year’s state championship appearance.
    Los Alamos plans to rely on its experience and a vigorous schedule to match last season’s success. The last time the Hilltoppers lost in a state championship, they regrouped the following season and claimed the program’s latest state championship (2009, 2010).
    The road to redemption begins 6 p.m. Tuesday as the Hilltoppers host defending Class 4A state champion Bosque School at Sullivan Field.  
    “Los Alamos always tends to have a tradition of being a pretty solid program and always has a mark on there back. So a lot of teams look at Los Alamos as a good bench mark,” said Ron Blue, who’s entering his third season as the Hilltoppers’ head coach. “Obviously this year will be a bit different. Coming in, I think we’re putting some pressure on ourselves.”
    “We believe that we have a team that can be very good. So we’re going to try to go and play and win as many games as possible.”

  • Prep Girl's Soccer: ’Toppers eye successful 2016 season

    Los Alamos girl’s soccer head coach Gary Ahlers wants his team to prove that last year’s state championship appearance wasn’t a one-year occurrence.    
    The Hilltoppers are coming off a lucrative 2015 season that included a 16-6-2 overall record, a District 2-5A championship and a Class 5A runner-up trophy.
    Los Alamos will have a much bigger target on its back for this season’s postseason triumph attempt. However, Ahlers believes the Hilltoppers can use last year’s recipe of hard work and desire to equal their success in 2016.        
    “Just hard work... Hard work and desire,” said Ahlers, who earned Class 5A coach of the year honors in 2015. “They’re going to have to want it. But I told them ‘one game at a time’. They’re glad to back and they want to prove that they deserved to be there last year.”
    Los Alamos’ quest for its fifth-consecutive district title is expected to be tougher this year with the inclusion of Albuquerque Academy. The Chargers will look to give Los Alamos its first district loss since 2011.   

  • N.M. student scores up, but less than 1/3 proficient

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — New Mexico student tests scores are up across the state, but less than a third of students remain proficient or better in reading and math, according to resulted released Thursday.
    The new numbers show around 20 percent of students tested this spring are proficient or better in math and about 28 percent are proficient or better in reading. Both results are slight improvements from the 2014-15 school year when officials first gave assessments developed by the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, or PARCC.
    The tests, administered by New Mexico and 10 other states, are designed to show how well schools helped students from grades 3 to 11 meet Common Core standards.
    State data show all grades tested except third saw small increases in the percentage of students scoring proficient or better in reading. All grades except 11th saw an increase in the percentage testing proficient in math, the results said.
    Albuquerque Public Schools, the state’s largest school district, had decreases in some categories. For example, only around 21 percent of the district’s third-graders scored proficient or better in reading. That’s a 10 point decline from the previous year.

  • US says $400M payment was contingent on release of prisoners

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration said Thursday that a $400 million cash payment to Iran seven months ago was contingent on the release of a group of American prisoners.

    It is the first time the U.S. has so clearly linked the two events, which critics have painted as a hostage-ransom arrangement.

    State Department spokesman John Kirby repeated the administration's line that the negotiations to return the Iranian money — from a military-equipment deal with the U.S.-backed shah in the 1970s — were conducted separately from the talks to free four U.S. citizens in Iran. But he said the U.S. withheld the delivery of the cash as leverage until Iran permitted the Americans to leave the country.

    "We had concerns that Iran may renege on the prisoner release," Kirby said, citing delays and mutual mistrust between countries that severed diplomatic relations 36 years ago. As a result, he explained, the U.S. "of course sought to retain maximum leverage until after the American citizens were released. That was our top priority."

    Both events occurred Jan. 17, fueling suspicions from Republican lawmakers and accusations from GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump of a quid pro quo that undermined America's longstanding opposition to ransom payments.

  • New Mexico student scores up, but less than 1/3 proficient

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — New Mexico student tests scores are up across the state, but less than a third of students remain proficient or better in reading and math, according to results released Thursday.

    The new numbers show around 20 percent of students tested this spring are proficient or better in math and about 28 percent are proficient or better in reading. Both results are slight improvements from the 2014-15 school year when officials first gave assessments developed by the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, or PARCC.

    The tests, administered by New Mexico and 10 other states, are designed to show how well schools helped students from grades 3 to 11 meet Common Core standards.

    State data show all grades tested except third saw small increases in the percentage of students scoring proficient or better in reading. All grades except 11th saw an increase in the percentage testing proficient in math, the results said.

    Albuquerque Public Schools, the state's largest school district, had decreases in some categories. For example, only around 21 percent of the district's third-graders scored proficient or better in reading. That's a 10 point decline from the previous year.

  • New Mexico governor to call special legislative session

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez said Thursday she will call for a special legislative session to address a budget crunch that has been building because of dwindling state revenues and weak energy prices.

    The governor's office is talking with House and Senate leaders, hoping all parties will be prepared to reach quick and easy agreements on shoring up the state's finances that will make the special session brief.

    "Yes, we're going to call one for sure and we want to make sure it doesn't go on and on for days and day because it costs New Mexicans about $50,000 a day to have a special session," Martinez said.

    While the exact timing for the special session is uncertain, Martinez said it will probably take place in September.

    Legislative analysts are expected to release an updated state revenue forecast next week.

    They have said the state general fund was short an estimated $150 million for the budget year that ended in June and faces potentially greater shortfalls for the current fiscal year that ends in June 2017.

    Martinez earlier this month directed most major state agencies to make spending cuts of at least 5 percent in response to a sharp downturn in tax receipts and revenue tied to oil and gas prices.

  • Green chile peels causing messy roads in New Mexico

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — It's harvest time for New Mexico's green chile. And some residents say peels from the state's staple crop are creating a hot mess.

    The KOAT-TV in Albuquerque reports that some trucks transporting green chile are dropping peels in Albuquerque's South Valley. Residents say the peels are sloshing and are spilling out of the trucks and onto roads.

    Drivers say one intersection even is covered in green chile.

    Andres Garcia says the wet peels are dangerous. He told KOAT-TV he recently had to hit his brakes at a stop sign because his truck kept sliding.

    The Bernalillo County Sheriff's Office says it is a misdemeanor crime for any truck to spill loads.

  • Today in history Aug. 18
  • Assets in Action: Starting school can be exciting for all

    Thursday, as the class of 2020 enters the building at LAHS, many local parents are sending their freshmen off to college and university near and abroad.
    Our second oldest son Spencer, and other locals including Bradley, Evan, Lane and Holly are headed to Eastern New Mexico University, in Portales.
    This was our first child to go away to school. That time between walking that graduation stage as a ‘Topper and pulling out of the driveway as we headed to Greyhound territory went very fast.
    Friends would ask how I was doing with preparations and truthfully my answer was, pretending it is not happening.
    As the Assets person in town, I was beyond elated when as we pulled up to Eddy Hall on campus, a band of merry makers descended upon us in music, song and overall glee. They encouraged the parents to remain in the car so they could park while they assisted the newest members of the school to their rooms – potentially 625 of them.
    It was a swarm of hands and hearts as we had to make sure our own suitcase and the tools that normally stay in the vehicle weren’t swept along, too.
    We whispered good luck, see you soon and in a flash they were gone.