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Today's News

  • Energy Sec. Perry to visit LANL Wednesday

    U.S. Energy Secretary Rick Perry will visit Los Alamos National Laboratory Wednesday to receive briefings on the lab’s capabilities in support of national security, nuclear deterrence, stockpile stewardship and nuclear non-proliferation, LANL announced late Tuesday.
    During the visit, Perry will also tour LANL’s nuclear weapons and global security facilities and meet with the Director Charles McMillan, and experts on the ground. As part of the tour, Perry will speak to lab employees.

  • Tunnel with nuclear waste collapses in Washington state

    SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — A portion of an underground tunnel containing rail cars full of radioactive waste collapsed Tuesday at a sprawling storage facility in a remote area of Washington state, forcing an evacuation of some workers at the site that made plutonium for nuclear weapons for decades after World War II.
    Officials detected no release of radiation at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation and no workers were injured, said Randy Bradbury, a spokesman for the Washington state Department of Ecology.
    No workers were inside the tunnel when it collapsed, causing soil on the surface above to sink two to four feet (half to 1.2 meters) over a 400 square foot (37.1 square meters) area, officials said.
    The tunnels are hundreds of feet long, with about eight feet (2.4 meters) of soil covering them, the U.S. Department of Energy said.
    The cause of the collapse was not immediately known. It  was discovered during a routine inspection and occurred during a massive cleanup that has been under way since the 1980s and costs more than $2 billion a year. The work is expected to take until 2060 and cost more than $100 billion.

  • Police respond to medical call at DMV

     Los Alamos Police Department officers responded to a medical emergency at about 4 p.m. Monday at the Los Alamos Department of Motor Vehicles parking lot on Central Avenue. The person was pronounced dead at the scene. Police withheld details of the deceased person's age or gender out of respect for the person's family. "It was just a sad, unfortunate situation," Police Spokesman Cmdr. Preston Ballew said.

  • Today in history 5-8-17
  • Charges dismissed against man accused of stealing mom's posolé

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — A New Mexico man arrested for breaking into his mom's house to steal her traditional New Mexican stew won't face charges after all.
    Last week, a state district judge dismissed charges against Jonathan Carlos Ray, who was charged in 2015 for the theft of his mother's posolé. The judge says the only witnesses to the alleged crime were Ray and his mother.
    Police say Ray was arrested after he ignored his mother's orders to stay away from her posolé and ran off with the holiday dish.
    According to a criminal complaint, Ray sent his mom a text message saying he wanted some of her posolé. She told him no.
    The complaint says the mother later found her gate and garage broken and a pot of the posole missing.
    Posolé, a hominy, is a traditional soup or stew made with pork or chicken popular in Mexico and the American Southwest.
     

  • Shelter Report 5-7-17

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, (505) 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are micro-chipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are 12–6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Saturday, and 12–3 p.m. Sunday.
    Be sure to check out our website at lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting, and donating.
    CATS
    Mr. Whiskers—A big tabby cat that is about 4 years old. Changes are a bit stressful for him, so he will likely need a little bit of time to adjust to his new home. He can be independent, but he’s also very sweet and likes to snuggle when he’s in the mood! He is OK with mellow cats, but other dominant males sometimes bother him.

  • Garden Club awards scholarship

    The Los Alamos Garden Club ‘s 2017 scholarship recipient is Madeline Makenzie Beck.
    The club chose Beck as she is an exceptionally well-rounded student, with excellent grades and many athletic achievements.
    Additionally, Beck is a volunteer in community service organizations such as the Special Olympics, the Nature Center and Reaching Through Reading.
    The club particularly appreciated her environmental efforts in the Los Alamos High School ECO Club and her own home garden. They wished her continued success as she pursues her course of study in Exercise Science at Montana State University.

  • County issues should stir healthy discussion

    My name is Greg White and this series of articles will cover three issues that the County Council hopefully will be discussing and acting on in a positive manner over the next several months. The first I’m sure they will, the next two can head off litigation. The first is a rewrite of the proposed immigrant resolution proposed by Councilor Pete Sheehey. The second is what will the council decide about the sheriff’s office. And the last is the legal status of appointing a county employee to an elected position, namely appointing the county manager as the county treasurer.
    I hope my articles will spur healthy and respectful discussion and encourage people to come to council meetings to make their voices heard, again in a civil and respectful way. Which may be best accomplished by the council changing it’s rules on public comment to allow five minutes per person as it’s hard no matter how concise you try to be to actually convey feelings in three minutes. Three minutes works for boxers, ever try boxing it’s a whole lot more tiring than it looks, but I always find myself running out of comment time about 30 seconds from finishing no matter how much I rehearse.

  • Does more politicking work for the people?

    Governance is like a Shakespeare play in which the two governing parties act out human parts. Shakespeare famously heightens the drama with leading roles that carry the main action, spiced with an occasional ghost who reveals mindsets that drive the action. But today the action seems less important than the interplay of ghosts.
    The main action is the substance of politics – the policies to be evolved, discussed and enacted ... the necessary business of the people, by the people, for the people. A timely example would be rebuilding the middle class.  
    The ghost in the play is the “politicking” – phantom voices that name who let down the middle class. The action is the governance; the mindsets are drivers. Together, a play.
    Yet, almost every scene in today’s play is dominated by politicking – raising and reprising story lines to mythic proportions – to the detriment of real action on the people’s business. More skewing gets done than business. 
    And it gets worse. Although each party clearly seeks different policies, the politicking on each side mirrors the other. It is eerie.       

  • Governor reconvenes lawmakers in budget showdown

    SANTA FE — Republican New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez ordered a special session of the Legislature on Friday to resolve a grinding state budget crisis, with no sign of a compromise with leading Democratic lawmakers.
    Calling legislators to the New Mexico Capitol on May 24, the governor’s proclamation asserts that lawmakers approved a $6.1 billion budget in March that was out-of-balance. The governor last month vetoed tax and fee hikes that many lawmakers say are necessary to shore up funding to public schools, courts and essential public services.
    The decision to reconvene lawmakers comes as the Supreme Court weighs accusations that Martinez overstepped her authority by defunding the Democratic-led Legislature and all state universities and colleges for the fiscal year beginning July 1 —  a step Martinez has said was necessary to avoid a deficit.
    The Legislature says the governor’s line-item vetoes upset the balance of powers between branches of government outlined in the state’s constitution by “effectively abolishing” the legislative branch.
    In a legal briefing Friday, the Martinez administration urged the Supreme Court to stay out of the budget standoff and said her vetoes were made in pursuit of reductions to state spending and never sought to abolish the Legislature.