Today's News

  • Latest Trump yard sign theft in Roswell caught on video

    ROSWELL (AP) — Roswell Republicans say hundreds of yard signs in support of Donald Trump have been stolen or vandalized in recent weeks, and the latest incident was caught on camera.

    The head of the Republican Party of Chaves County, Jason Perry, says surveillance video shows a woman getting out of a vehicle and struggling to dismantle a large Trump-Pence sign in front of a home early Tuesday before taking off with the sign.

    The Roswell Daily Record reports that the surveillance video has been turned over to police.

    Perry says about 85 percent of the Trump signs placed in Roswell have been destroyed, costing the state and local parties thousands of dollars.

    Chaves County Democratic Party chair Michael Trujillo says he thinks kids are playing around and that three Democrat signs were either stolen or vandalized in recent weeks.

  • Chiles in New York, new chile book in New Mexico

    The two chile plants were big enough that the restaurant staffer carried one in each hand. He hung the plants upside down, each on a hook on the restaurant wall. Dirt clung to the roots. The chiles, each about six inches long and a pure red, were slightly shriveled. A very New Mexican image, except that the restaurant, Rafele, is in Greenwich Village in New York City. An owner of the restaurant grew the chiles on a farm upstate, I was told.
    Roasting and processing chile is another fall image, but one not seen so much outside the state.
    Since 1997 University of New Mexico alumni chapter members have gathered for group chile processing by the ton.
    I can’t imagine a ton of green chile. My images stop at a bag or two or the bushel we’ve done the past few years. My daughter’s 2016 chile image was the ten pounds that arrived in New Hampshire as a birthday present the night before she, husband and baby were set to fly to Albuquerque. But there were the chiles and process they did.
    UNM’s Washington, D.C., alumni group processed two tons of chile last year, says the alumni office. Maybe they were the bureaucrats who have fled Santa Fe for Washington the past 15 or 20 years as state government competence has eroded.
    Six other chapters gathered processing crews. Total production was six tons.

  • LAHS cross country to host Elementary Mile

    The 10th annual Elementary Mile will be held in conjunction with the Los Alamos High School Cross Country Invitational Friday.
    The race is open for any elementary-age runner who can run a mile. The Los Alamos Family YMCA and Los Alamos Public Schools elementary physical education teachers have entry forms. Check in ends at 4 p.m. Friday at the Los Alamos Golf Course clubhouse patio. The race will at 4:45 p.m.

  • Get your scarecrows ready!

    Los Alamos Arts Council is ready to bring a bit of frightful autumn fun to downtown Los Alamos again this year by sponsoring the annual Scarecrow Contest.
    Since 2001, scarecrows have graced the streetlights along Central Avenue during the week before Halloween. The registration fee is $10, and the council awards prizes to the scarecrows for their creativity and seasonal spirit. Anyone can participate – individual, family, organization, business.
    The judging takes place during the week. Scarecrows are given points for creativity, being well-designed, and handcrafted. There will be places to vote for the community favorite at CB Fox and Ruby K’s.
    Fill out an application found on the Arts Council website or pick one up at the Arts Council office. Bring the application and scarecrow to the Visitor Center on Saturday from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. There will be someone there to assist you and direct you to a numbered pole.

  • Today in history Oct. 19
  • LA Soup and Specialty Foods expands, offers service at projectY

    LA Soup and Specialty Foods, LLC, owned by Monica Van de Water, has announced it will be offering a pop-up soup and perogies service at projectY cowork Los Alamos Oct. 25 for lunch and dinner.
    Since 2015, Van de Water has offered home delivery service of specialty soups and comfort food sides she cooks out of her licensed commercial-grade kitchen in White Rock.
    Having attracted some loyal followers through her research and development over the years, Van de Water is now ready to expand and wants to introduce her food to the greater Los Alamos and White Rock communities.  
    During the pop-up, patrons may pick up food from projectY cowork, located at 150 Central Park Square, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. for lunch and 4-6 p.m. for dinner. Van de Water will be serving her roasted pumpkin garlic soup with Brazilian cheese breads, as well as perogies smothered with either caramelized onions and bacon, or a vegetarian-friendly version with mushrooms. Single- and family-sized portions will be served to eat on-site or take home. Advance orders may be made through the LA Soup and Specialty Foods’ website, but it is not required.

  • Community Calendar 10-19-16

    Los Alamos High School Fourth Annual Career Fair from noon-3 p.m. the A-wing lobby. Over 25 Los Alamos community members representing a variety of careers have committed to attend this year’s event. There will also be mock interview sessions and resume reviews. The LAHS food service will be selling lunch items prior to the start of the Career Fair.
    The New Mexico Garden Clubs District II Executive Fall Board meeting is at 10 a.m. at Smith’s Market Place in the upstairs meeting room. Registration is from 10-10:30. Call Treasurer Laurie Hixson for reservations.

    Science on Tap: Harnessing actinium-225 for cancer treatment at 5:30 p.m. at UnQuarked Wine Room. All ages can attend this event. Maryline Ferrier, with Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Inorganic Isotope and Actinide Chemistry group, will talk about the research taking place at the lab to better understand actinium-225. Q&A and discussion will follow a short introduction to the subject.

    Nature Yoga from 5:15-6:15 p.m. at the Nature Center. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Cost is $15 for non-members, $12 for members.

  • Assets in Action: Teachers continue to give maximum effort

    I write my column this week as just a mom, just a parent or caregiver like many of you.
    If you don’t really keep up with the news, last week our teachers, kind of got a punch in the gut. I dare to say two rounds of it, to be honest.
    Round one was the data release of teacher evaluations. The snippets that we hear about here and there are not really enough to allow the average bear to really understand what all of the fuss is about. It may even come across as people just not wanting to be evaluated, but if you could hear some of the tales, it is a slap in the face to good educators.
    There is not enough column space for me to explain what is involved in a teacher evaluation, how wrong they can be and how illogical it all sounds when talking about an educational system. As a town that thrives on data, the hypothesis is clearly not supported by the experiment, as the analysis of the data does not allow one to draw conclusions possibly allowing results that may not align partially or at all with the data.
    How’s that for the layman’s explanation?
    Now for round two of the fight. Last week, staff heard they were not allowed to miss more than three days during the school year without suffering more related to evaluations.

  • Garcia Richard, Stover respond to voters

    Contenders for New Mexico House District 43, Democratic incumbent Stephanie Garcia Richard and Republican challenger Sharon Stover, answered voters’ questions at the Oct. 6 League of Women Voters of Los Alamos (LWVLA) candidate forum.
    The first question was whether the candidates would support a 20-week abortion ban.
    “I feel that it is a woman’s choice, between her God and her doctor,” Stover responded. “In terms of a 20-week abortion ban, I think after a certain point, we all value the sanctity of life, and that is something that I would consider. I would like to look at what the entire bill says, but I do believe life is precious and we need to save it.”
    “I have never supported any restrictions on a woman’s right to choose, a woman’s access to her health care,” Garcia Richard said. “I believe those decisions should be between the woman and her doctor. I don’t think the state has any business interfering in that decision.”

  • DOE completes legacy waste cleanup at 4 sites in LA Canyon

    Four toxic waste sites located on the south rim of Los Alamos Canyon have been cleaned of toxic waste, according to the Department of Energy and the Environmental Management Field Office.
    The sites, located on the south-facing side of the canyon, contained surface deposits of waste leftover from the Manhattan Project.
    “Removing contaminated soil from these four sites represents an important step in our cleanup efforts around the Los Alamos Townsite,” EM-LA Manager Doug Hintze said.
    The DOE reported Oct. 6 it had removed about 133 cubic yards of soil from the site, where it was screened and packaged it for transport to a waste disposal site in Utah.
    The waste was located adjacent to DOE property, and was accessed through private land located along the north rim of the canyon.
    The cleanup began in June and was carried out by private subcontractor TerranearPMC.
    The project was part of the 2016 Compliance Order of Consent that was recently finalized by the DOE, Los Alamos National Laboratory’s management contractor, Los Alamos National Security LLC, and the New Mexico Environment Department.
    The DOE is planning to clean the last sites on the south rim in 2017. The DOE reported the project was done “under budget and ahead of schedule.”