Today's News

  • ‘Lion King’ a visual delight for all ages


  • Shrinking budget will force change on state’s higher ed

    New Mexico’s small population stretches over a big state, so we have taken higher education to the students, with 32 colleges and universities. Nearly every sizable community has a branch or an independent institution.
    For our students, who tend to be older and need to hold a job while they take classes, this is a good thing.
    But one of the bigger arguments in the recent legislative special session was how much to cut higher education. The institutions skated with relatively small cuts, but probably not for long. We’re not out of the hole, and come January, lawmakers will put everything back on the table.
    Recently, Higher Education Secretary Barbara Damron announced that the state’s system is unsustainable. Each institution has its own board, and they’re more dependent on state funding than experts say is healthy. New Mexico Junior College in Hobbs is lowest, at 20 percent, while Mesalands Community College in Tucumcari is highest, at 61 percent. The three biggest institutions get 35 to 40 percent of their funding from the state.
    As state revenues have tanked, so have enrollments, which had risen during the early part of the recession. Also, our population is shrinking as people leave the state. Graduation rates are poor (35 percent, compared with 40 percent nationally).

  • ’Toppers volleyball edges Chargers in comeback, 5-set win

    In a tight District 2-5A race, the Los Alamos volleyball team has made the most out of its pressure situations.
    The Hilltoppers won their fourth match in the last five - all in five sets - after downing Albuquerque Academy 25-27, 25-13, 29-31, 25-16, 15-7 on Wednesday’s “Dig Pink” match at Griffith Gym.
    “The good part about going five (sets) all the time is that it’s going to keep us in condition and keep us going,” Los Alamos coach Diana Stokes said. “We had some good moments there. Each time they (Los Alamos) play well, they have to believe in themselves.”
    With the exception of last Saturday’s loss to Del Norte, Los Alamos (9-9 overall, 4-2 District 2-5A)  has been stellar in decisive sets, and that was the case on Wednesday against Academy (7-11 overall, 0-6 District 2-5A). The Hilltoppers jumped out to an 8-1 lead in the fifth set and sealed the win with a strong defensive performance.
    “Seniors came through tonight,” Stokes said. “Kaitlin (Bennett) came through big again tonight. Jessica (Moore) her first game was a little rough but that last dig that she got in the back row just fired up everybody. They just to learn that they have to keep fired up.”

  • LAHS cross country to host home meet Friday

    A strong performance at home can help the Los Alamos cross country teams build momentum for the ladder stages of the season.
    The Hilltoppers will host their annual home invitational with events starting at 3 p.m. Friday at the Los Alamos Municipal Golf Course.
    The meet comes at a timely matter for Los Alamos, as it’ll host the District 2-5A meet next Friday, and the Class 5A state meet is scheduled for Nov. 5.
    Los Alamos has experienced a bit of everything in its opening four meets, including two eighth-graders leading both the boy’s and girl’s teams.
    Lidia Appell has been the top runner in every meet this season for the Hilltopper girls. The eighth-grader ran a season-best 19:49 at the Albuquerque Academy Invitational on Sept. 23.
    Paulina Burnside and Sydney Schake have also provided the Los Alamos girls with strong performances this season. The Hilltoppers have also benefited from the return on junior Zoe Hemez, who made her first appearance of the season two weeks ago at the Titan Thunder Invitational in Colorado Springs, Colorado.
    On the boy’s side, Los Alamos is lead by eighth-grader Rafael Sanchez, who’s finished in under 17 minutes in all meets except for one this season.
    Senior Kai Coblentz and junior Josh Strevell have contributed with top 20 and 30 finishes.

  • Chiles in New York, new chile book in New Mexico

    The two chile plants were big enough that the restaurant staffer carried one in each hand. He hung the plants upside down, each on a hook on the restaurant wall. Dirt clung to the roots. The chiles, each about six inches long and a pure red, were slightly shriveled. A very New Mexican image, except that the restaurant, Rafele, is in Greenwich Village in New York City. An owner of the restaurant grew the chiles on a farm upstate, I was told.
    Roasting and processing chile is another fall image, but one not seen so much outside the state.
    Since 1997 University of New Mexico alumni chapter members have gathered for group chile processing by the ton.
    I can’t imagine a ton of green chile. My images stop at a bag or two or the bushel we’ve done the past few years. My daughter’s 2016 chile image was the ten pounds that arrived in New Hampshire as a birthday present the night before she, husband and baby were set to fly to Albuquerque. But there were the chiles and process they did.
    UNM’s Washington, D.C., alumni group processed two tons of chile last year, says the alumni office. Maybe they were the bureaucrats who have fled Santa Fe for Washington the past 15 or 20 years as state government competence has eroded.
    Six other chapters gathered processing crews. Total production was six tons.

  • LAHS cross country to host Elementary Mile

    The 10th annual Elementary Mile will be held in conjunction with the Los Alamos High School Cross Country Invitational Friday.
    The race is open for any elementary-age runner who can run a mile. The Los Alamos Family YMCA and Los Alamos Public Schools elementary physical education teachers have entry forms. Check in ends at 4 p.m. Friday at the Los Alamos Golf Course clubhouse patio. The race will at 4:45 p.m.

  • Get your scarecrows ready!

    Los Alamos Arts Council is ready to bring a bit of frightful autumn fun to downtown Los Alamos again this year by sponsoring the annual Scarecrow Contest.
    Since 2001, scarecrows have graced the streetlights along Central Avenue during the week before Halloween. The registration fee is $10, and the council awards prizes to the scarecrows for their creativity and seasonal spirit. Anyone can participate – individual, family, organization, business.
    The judging takes place during the week. Scarecrows are given points for creativity, being well-designed, and handcrafted. There will be places to vote for the community favorite at CB Fox and Ruby K’s.
    Fill out an application found on the Arts Council website or pick one up at the Arts Council office. Bring the application and scarecrow to the Visitor Center on Saturday from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. There will be someone there to assist you and direct you to a numbered pole.

  • LA Soup and Specialty Foods expands, offers service at projectY

    LA Soup and Specialty Foods, LLC, owned by Monica Van de Water, has announced it will be offering a pop-up soup and perogies service at projectY cowork Los Alamos Oct. 25 for lunch and dinner.
    Since 2015, Van de Water has offered home delivery service of specialty soups and comfort food sides she cooks out of her licensed commercial-grade kitchen in White Rock.
    Having attracted some loyal followers through her research and development over the years, Van de Water is now ready to expand and wants to introduce her food to the greater Los Alamos and White Rock communities.  
    During the pop-up, patrons may pick up food from projectY cowork, located at 150 Central Park Square, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. for lunch and 4-6 p.m. for dinner. Van de Water will be serving her roasted pumpkin garlic soup with Brazilian cheese breads, as well as perogies smothered with either caramelized onions and bacon, or a vegetarian-friendly version with mushrooms. Single- and family-sized portions will be served to eat on-site or take home. Advance orders may be made through the LA Soup and Specialty Foods’ website, but it is not required.

  • Community Calendar 10-19-16

    Los Alamos High School Fourth Annual Career Fair from noon-3 p.m. the A-wing lobby. Over 25 Los Alamos community members representing a variety of careers have committed to attend this year’s event. There will also be mock interview sessions and resume reviews. The LAHS food service will be selling lunch items prior to the start of the Career Fair.
    The New Mexico Garden Clubs District II Executive Fall Board meeting is at 10 a.m. at Smith’s Market Place in the upstairs meeting room. Registration is from 10-10:30. Call Treasurer Laurie Hixson for reservations.

    Science on Tap: Harnessing actinium-225 for cancer treatment at 5:30 p.m. at UnQuarked Wine Room. All ages can attend this event. Maryline Ferrier, with Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Inorganic Isotope and Actinide Chemistry group, will talk about the research taking place at the lab to better understand actinium-225. Q&A and discussion will follow a short introduction to the subject.

    Nature Yoga from 5:15-6:15 p.m. at the Nature Center. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Cost is $15 for non-members, $12 for members.

  • Assets in Action: Teachers continue to give maximum effort

    I write my column this week as just a mom, just a parent or caregiver like many of you.
    If you don’t really keep up with the news, last week our teachers, kind of got a punch in the gut. I dare to say two rounds of it, to be honest.
    Round one was the data release of teacher evaluations. The snippets that we hear about here and there are not really enough to allow the average bear to really understand what all of the fuss is about. It may even come across as people just not wanting to be evaluated, but if you could hear some of the tales, it is a slap in the face to good educators.
    There is not enough column space for me to explain what is involved in a teacher evaluation, how wrong they can be and how illogical it all sounds when talking about an educational system. As a town that thrives on data, the hypothesis is clearly not supported by the experiment, as the analysis of the data does not allow one to draw conclusions possibly allowing results that may not align partially or at all with the data.
    How’s that for the layman’s explanation?
    Now for round two of the fight. Last week, staff heard they were not allowed to miss more than three days during the school year without suffering more related to evaluations.