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Today's News

  • Local expert to lead wildflower walk

    Pajarito Environmental Education Center’s Jemez Mountain Herbarium curator Chick Keller will lead a Wildflower Walk starting at 5:30 p.m. May 22.
    These popular monthly outings are easy walks to identify some of the wildflowers in and around Los Alamos.
    Each month, Keller will pick a different trail, depending on what is blooming at the time. The walks are free and there is no advance registration required.
    The Wildflower Walks will take place one Monday a month for the season. Instead of having a walk in June, there will be two walks in July: July 3 and 24. Participants will receive a plant list and that, along with instruction from Keller, will help them learn how to identify wildflowers currently blooming in Los Alamos.
    The group meets at 5:30 p.m. at the Los Alamos Nature Center, located at 2600 Canyon Road, to carpool to the trailhead.
    For more information about this and other PEEC programs, visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org or call 662-0460.

  • Assets in Action: A good week to give thanks

    Sometimes you just need to celebrate and this is certainly the month to do it.
    This week is teacher appreciation week! Yes they give us a whole week to pick a day to let our teachers know we care about them. You don’t have to do something spectacular to acknowledge the day in and day out devotion they have for our children.
    If you need an idea or two, drop an email and say thanks, have a bit more time, hand write a short note to say thank you. Pick flowers from your own garden or do it in baking or crafting or a special candy from the store. The truth is most people just want to know that you notice.
    One of my favorite elementary years for our oldest was allowing him to pick out a candy for the teacher. He picked a pretty big one and I was certain her own children would be thankful too.
    Did you also know it is National Nurse’s week?
    There are school nurses and hospital nurses and you may know one or two that you salute on your own. My personal favorites are Megan Pfeffer, Valencia Jenkins, Kathy Semelsberger, Mrs. Ballew and Peggy Ickes. There are many, many more and I hope you have one or two in your life.

  • Community Calendar 5-10-17

    FRIDAY
    Gentle Walks
at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free.

    The Bear Buffet at 6 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Come “Eat like a Bear” during bear month! Join in a discussion about rescued bear cubs with Dr. Kathleen Ramsay and partake of a representation of the many delicacies of a bear diet. Cost is $30 for non-members, $24 for PEEC members.
    SATURDAY
    “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead” plays at 7:30 p.m. at the Los Alamos Little Theatre, 1670 Nectar St. Tickets are $14. Cost is $12 for students and seniors.

    Bear Festival from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Bring your friends and family to discover more about the amazing creatures with which we share our home! Free.

    Feature Film: Mysteries of the Unseen World
at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. Discover what is normally too fast, too slow, too small, or outside the visible spectrum. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.

    “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead” plays at 7:30 p.m. at the Los Alamos Little Theatre, 1670 Nectar St. Tickets are $14. Cost is $12 for students and seniors.

     

  • Lunch with Leader set for May 16

    League of Women Voters’ community event, Lunch with a Leader, will present information about the Recreation Bond at 11:45 a.m. May 16 at the Mesa Public Library.
    Darren Meadows, Philo Shelton, James Chrobocinski, Susan O’Leary, Lisa Shin, James Whitehead and Lisa Brenner will explain both sides of the bond and answer questions.
    Both sides will present for 15 minutes and then the group will open up for questions.
    The Recreation Bond is currently up for a vote with a mail-in ballot that is already in county homes. The mail-in ballots must be received at the County Clerk’s office by mail or in person by May 23.
    Speaking as proponents of the bond are County Councilors O’Leary and Chrobocinski, Los Alamos County Public Works Director Shelton, and Meadows, a professional engineer consulting for Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Presenting opposing views are Shin, an optometrist in town, Brenner, the Creative Director of EDJ Werks, and Whitehead. These three local citizens started A Better Way for LA PAC.
    More information about the projects, the projected cost, and the operations and maintenance cost is available at losalamosbondprojects2017.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Planned-Project-Overview.pdf.

  • Funding, experience improve outlook for fire season

    Driving across the high plains recently, we spotted a fire stretched out across a field and thought somebody was burning weeds until we saw the fire truck speeding down the road from Fort Sumner.
    It’s that time of year when we scan the horizon, a little anxiously. Recent rains have spared us the usual bad news. As I write this, there was a small fire in the Gila National Forest and a larger fire across the line in Arizona.
    So we have the luxury of thinking about readiness, which means spending.
    In the much anticipated appropriations bill, Sens. Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich helped snag $4.2 billion for wildland fire management by the U. S. Forest Service and U. S. Interior Department. This includes $2.05 billion the agencies can use to respond to forest fires; with carryover balances, they should have enough money for expected firefighting.
    Udall got $407 million in emergency funding so the agencies don’t have to borrow from non-fire accounts. This is significant. What’s happened in the last few years is that Congress cut the Forest Service and Interior to the nub at the same time severe wildfires increased. Then the agencies had to tap funding they would have used for restoration and forest health, so preventive work didn’t get done. And that in turn leads to charges of mismanagement by the agencies.

  • Vote against the Rec Bond: There’s a Better Way

    BY LISA SHIN
    President of A Better Way for LA PAC

    A Better Way for LA PAC was formed by concerned citizens who propose that we expand and improve recreation in ways that are fiscally responsible and sustainable. I do not question the quality of life benefits our community would receive from the Recreation Bond. Personally, I would love to see an indoor ice-skating rink and expanded recreational facilities.
    However, I question whether this bond represents the highest and best use of our tax dollars, when there are so many competing needs. There is a better way. 

    I am talking about robust and diverse funding models which have been adopted nationwide to build and operate state-of-the-art facilities. An entrepreneurial, business-minded approach to generating revenues. Strong engagement with the private sector. Philanthropy from private citizens, businesses and charitable foundations.

    Consider the city of Hobbs, which spent four years to “stand together and redefine the term ‘public-private partnership’ where six public and private institutions came together to collaborate on a true center of recreational excellence.” The CORE is set to open in the spring of 2018.

  • Tunnel with nuclear waste collapses in Washington state

    SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — A portion of an underground tunnel containing rail cars full of radioactive waste collapsed Tuesday at a sprawling storage facility in a remote area of Washington state, forcing an evacuation of some workers at the site that made plutonium for nuclear weapons for decades after World War II.
    Officials detected no release of radiation at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation and no workers were injured, said Randy Bradbury, a spokesman for the Washington state Department of Ecology.
    No workers were inside the tunnel when it collapsed, causing soil on the surface above to sink two to four feet (half to 1.2 meters) over a 400 square foot (37.1 square meters) area, officials said.
    The tunnels are hundreds of feet long, with about eight feet (2.4 meters) of soil covering them, the U.S. Department of Energy said.
    The cause of the collapse was not immediately known. It  was discovered during a routine inspection and occurred during a massive cleanup that has been under way since the 1980s and costs more than $2 billion a year. The work is expected to take until 2060 and cost more than $100 billion.

  • Police respond to medical call at DMV

     Los Alamos Police Department officers responded to a medical emergency at about 4 p.m. Monday at the Los Alamos Department of Motor Vehicles parking lot on Central Avenue. The person was pronounced dead at the scene. Police withheld details of the deceased person's age or gender out of respect for the person's family. "It was just a sad, unfortunate situation," Police Spokesman Cmdr. Preston Ballew said.

  • Today in history 5-8-17
  • Charges dismissed against man accused of stealing mom's posolé

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — A New Mexico man arrested for breaking into his mom's house to steal her traditional New Mexican stew won't face charges after all.
    Last week, a state district judge dismissed charges against Jonathan Carlos Ray, who was charged in 2015 for the theft of his mother's posolé. The judge says the only witnesses to the alleged crime were Ray and his mother.
    Police say Ray was arrested after he ignored his mother's orders to stay away from her posolé and ran off with the holiday dish.
    According to a criminal complaint, Ray sent his mom a text message saying he wanted some of her posolé. She told him no.
    The complaint says the mother later found her gate and garage broken and a pot of the posole missing.
    Posolé, a hominy, is a traditional soup or stew made with pork or chicken popular in Mexico and the American Southwest.