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Today's News

  • Shelter Report 3-22-17

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are noon – 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturday, and noon–3 p.m. Sunday.
    Be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. Also check out Petfinder website for pictures of adoptable animals: petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.
    CATS
    Fernando—A young white and orange kitty who loves lounging the day away. This friendly male is currently in a larger kennel that has a “cat hammock” hanging inside – he loves lounging in it! He can be a bit picky about his feline friends, so he might need a little bit of time to warm up to new companions.
    Mr. Whiskers—A big tabby cat that is about 4 years old. Changes are a bit stressful for him, so he will likely need a little bit of time to adjust to his new home. He can be independent, but he’s also very sweet and likes to snuggle when he’s in the mood! He is okay with mellow cats, but other dominant males sometimes bother him.

  • Spaying, neutering pets may be best decision for pet’s health

    Although the idea of your pet having surgery can be scary, spaying and neutering is a common practice performed by veterinarians that can be beneficial to both you and your pet. In fact, the decision to spay or neuter your pet may be the best decision for your pet’s overall health.
    Dr. Mark Stickney, clinical associate professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained the benefits of spaying and neutering.
    “Spaying is the removal of reproductive organs in female dogs and cats,” Stickney said. “Spaying has a few general benefits, such as owners not having to tend to heat cycles or surprise litters of puppies or kittens. Benefits to neutering male pets—or removing the testicles – include decreased urine marking and aggression toward other males. In addition, neutered male pets are less likely to roam, a behavior that typically occurs when females of the same species are in heat. Roaming also puts your male pet at risk for getting lost, hurt, or injured by a car. Spaying and neutering also helps combat pet overpopulation.”

  • Melissa Savage to speak at library

    Melissa Savage, the author of “Rio: a Photographic Journey down the Old Rio Grande,” will speak at 7 p.m. at Mesa Public Library Thursday.
    Savage is a conservationist, geographer, professor emerita with UCLA, and director of the Four Corners Institute in Santa Fe. Her book is comprised of historical photographs of the Rio Grande, which are accompanied by essays written by people who are closely associated with the history of the river.
    UNM Press describes the book as: “The dynamic Río Grande has run through all the valley’s diverse cultures: Puebloan, Spanish, Mexican and Anglo. Photography arrived in the region at the beginning of the river’s great transformation by trade, industry and cultivation. In RIO, Melissa Savage has collected images that document the sweeping history of that transformation – from those of 19th-century expeditionary photographer W. H. Jackson to the work of the great 20th-century chronicler of the river, Laura Gilpin.”
    The Authors Speak program at Mesa Public Library provides a unique opportunity to meet prominent authors from the region. The readings and conversations take place on the fourth Thursday of each month, upstairs at Mesa Public Library. The Authors sell and sign books after the talks.

  • Vintage US nuclear test films published online

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — From the deserts of southern New Mexico and Nevada to islands in the Pacific Ocean, the U.S. government conducted dozens of nuclear weapons tests from the 1940s until the early 1960s.
    Vintage rolls of film collected from high-security vaults across the country show some of the blasts sending incredible mushroom clouds into the sky and massive fireballs across the landscape. Others start with blinding flashes of light followed by rising columns of smoke in the distance.
    A team from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory this week published more than five dozen films salvaged from government installations where they had sat idle for years.
    Lab physicist Greg Spriggs said the decades-old films were in danger of decomposing and being lost to history. He called them a big part of the nation’s history and an important tool for providing better data to modern scientists who now use computer codes to help certify that the U.S. nuclear stockpile remains safe and effective.
    “We don’t have any experimental data for modern weapons in the atmosphere. The only data that we have are the old tests,” he said, noting that the manual methods used in the 1950s to analyze the blasts weren’t that accurate.

  • Losing it for a good cause

    Twenty three people showed up at Fuller Lodge to get their heads shaved for a good cause Friday morning – to help the Los Alamos Fire Department raise funds for the St. Baldrick’s Foundation.
    The foundation helps fund cancer research for children, mostly through community “cutathons,” where people can pledge money to the foundation  and then get their heads shaved.
    This is the fifth year the LAFD has hosted the event in Los Alamos. Fire Capt. Micah Brittelle organized the charity event from the beginning.
    “It seemed to me like a really great cause,” Brittelle said. “I just thought it would be nice to have an event like this here in Los Alamos.”  
    The St. Baldrick’s Los Alamos County Fire Department donation page shows the department has so far raised more than $1,300 for the one day event, and that number will continue to grow as donations continue to come in.  
    Last year, the fire department raised $7,500 for St. Baldrick’s. The department is hoping to match or exceed the same goal this year.
    Residents who want to help the fire department reach  this year’s goal can go to stbaldricks.org web page, find “Los Alamos Fire Department” and donate. The page will be up all year.

  • LANL interns face housing shortage

    Students arriving this summer for internships at the Los Alamos National Laboratory will face a tough challenge trying to find a place to stay in Los Alamos County.
    With a shortage of rooms and student housing running up against the lab’s intentions to expand its workforce by the thousands in the next several years, interns will be left with few options for housing.
    In 2016, LANL hired over 1,000 summer interns.
    Every year, stories emerge of students camping out in the Jemez or getting an apartment in Santa Fe to help them through the summer. Their stay times can last a week, a season, or only a month, making it hard to fit them into an apartment lease or some other structured rent situation in Los Alamos County, even though they may have the money to pay.   
    “Those of us who are in the business of knowing about lab students and their summer housing situation, we know it can be a near-desperate attempt to find housing for students,” said resident Stephen Boerigter, who is also the chairman of the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos Advisory Board and a member of the Los Alamos Public School District board.
    During intern season in Los Alamos, rent can range between $700 and $900. If an intern starts looking in January, they may be able to get a room for $500 for the length of their stay.

  • Music instructor looks back on 12 years of teaching

    Gregory Schneider has taught  Music Together in Los Alamos for 12 years and a new spring session is about to begin.
     “I enjoy being the first music teacher that most of my students – and sometimes their families, have ever had,” Schneider said. “It’s rewarding getting children and their families hooked on actively making music, not just passively listening to it.”
    Some of his very first students would have been in the under age 5 category with his youngest every being just 3 weeks old. Today they may very well be walking the halls of the local middle or high school and still have a love for music.
    “Even newborns respond to music in an age appropriate manner and the music they hear at that early age does imprint upon their brain even long before they can speak or sing,” Schneider said.
    Schneider explained that the Music Together curriculum is founded upon the work of researchers like Harvard Educational Psychologist Howard Gardner. Schneider explained how musical learning can make children more receptive to learning in other areas due to brain stimulation.
    Classes are taught locally on Wednesdays from 5:30-6:15 p.m. in Sherrill Hall at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church.

  • AG: Email scammers use name of New Mexico's top judge

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — If you get an email asking for money from the chief justice of the New Mexico Supreme Court, it's a scam.

    The New Mexico Attorney General's Office warned Friday about a new email seeking to extort money, suggesting that recipients need to appear in court or face arrest if they don't pay $750.

    The poorly worded email includes Justice Charles Daniels' name and photograph but incorrectly lists his title as court clerk.

    Authorities say there have been plenty of email scams in recent years that have impersonated local police, sheriffs and even state Attorney General Hector Balderas, but this appears to be the first in which a state Supreme Court justice's name has been tapped.

    Balderas' office and the high court are warning people not to respond to the email.

  • Hilltopper girls win big at Rust Buster meet

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper girls track and field team had a big performance last weekend at the Rio Rancho Rust Buster.
    In all, nine teams, most of them Class 6A schools from the Albuquerque area took part in the Rust Buster – for many of the teams involved, it was the first meet of the season – but the Hilltopper girls earned a comfortable victory. The Hilltoppers finished with 133.6 points Saturday at Rio Rancho High School.
    Los Alamos finished comfortably ahead of the host Rio Rancho Rams to win the girls team title. The Rams picked up 109.6 points. None of the other seven teams competing in the meet factored into the decision.
    The Hilltopper boys track team also took part last Saturday, picking up third place in the nine-team meet. The Hilltopper boys earned 60.5 points, while the host Rams held off Eldorado to win the team competition.
    In the girls competition, Los Alamos picked up some big performances in the relay events to help it win that team title. Los Alamos also had a very good showing in the field events.
    The Hilltoppers won the 400-meter and 1600-meter relays, and finished second in the other two relays on the day. They had dominant performances, winning the 400 relay by nearly a second-and-a-half, while the 1600 relay team won by more than 7 seconds over runner-up Cibola in that event.

  • ’Topper softball, baseball pick up big wins

    Los Alamos’ softball team used the long ball to its full advantage Tuesday afternoon in a road victory over the Pojoaque Valley Elkettes.
    The Hilltoppers blasted three home runs in the game, the big blow a three-run shot to straightaway center field by Alicia Gonzales.
    Gonzales’ fifth-inning blast broke open a tight ballgame, putting the Hilltoppers up 7-3 at the time. Relief pitcher Reyna Lucero closed out the game after the Hilltoppers came up with two more runs to win it 9-3 at Chris Peterson Memorial Field.
    Los Alamos is off to a hot start this season, particularly at the plate, ahead of a big road doubleheader today against Class 5A Belen. Los Alamos’ offense has produced 58 runs in six games this season.
    Pojoaque Valley’s Elkettes (0-4) actually drew first blood in the game, scoring twice in the bottom of the first, but Los Alamos answered right back with a pair of runs in the top of the second. Los Alamos took the lead for good with another pair of runs in the third, those coming on its first homer of the game, that provided by Megan Romero.
    Claire Bluhm also hit a solo home run late in the game for Los Alamos (5-1) on Tuesday.