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Today's News

  • Police beat 8/26/14

     

     Police Beat items are compiled from public information contained in Los Alamos Police Department Records. Charges or citations listed in Police Beat do not imply innocence or guilt. The Los Alamos Police Department uses the term “arrest” to define anyone who has been physically arrested, served a court summons, or issued a citation.

    Aug. 7

     

    9: 26 a.m. —  Rachel Parker, 23, of Los Alamos, was arrested on a municipal court warrant at 2500 Trinity Drive.

     

    11:34 a.m. — A 42-year-old Los Alamos woman reported she was the victim of larceny (less than $250) on Tewa Loop.

  • Drug suspect back in custody

     Steven Porter, a 46-year-old White Rock man who is facing 20 charges involving controlled substances — 13 felonies and seven misdemeanors — is back in jail after violating terms of his release, according to LAPD commander Jason Wardlow-Herrera Tuesday.

    Wardlow-Herrera said Porter tampered with his electronic monitoring device. Porter made his first court appearance before Magistrate Judge Pat Casados Tuesday and was given a strict set or orders for his release.

    Bond was posted last Tuesday and Porter was released last Wednesday. His next court appearance is scheduled for Sept. 2.

  • Forest health info now available

     

    The public, forest managers, and scientists now have the most comprehensive inventory of forest health trends in New Mexico’s history. Through a successful partnership between the U.S. Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station and the New Mexico State Forestry Division the results of a multi-year forest study are now available.

    Given that 44 percent of New Mexico’s forests are tied to private and tribal lands, it was critical for the U.S. Forest Service and the State to work together on the inventory.

  • Antibacterial approach could resolve skin infections

     Like a protective tent over a colony of harmful bacteria, biofilms make the treatment of skin infections especially difficult. Microorganisms protected in a biofilm pose a significant health risk due to their antibiotic resistance and recalcitrance to treatment, and biofilm-protected bacteria account for some 80 percent of total bacterial infections in humans and are 50 to 1,000 times more resistant to antibiotics than simpler bacterial infections.

    “In essence, we may have stumbled onto a magic bullet,” said David Fox, a Los Alamos National Laboratory researcher on the project. “Through a robust screening strategy, our research team has identified a unique class of materials, known as ionic liquids, which both neutralize biofilm-forming pathogens and deliver drugs through the skin,” he said.

  • Be There calendar 08-26-14 to 09-02-14

     

    Today

    A chapter of The Compassionate Friends will meet on the fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the northeast side of the new YMCA Annex, Central Park Square, suite 140. Co-led by Eric Ferm and Valerie Wood. The organization offers non-denominational grief support after the death of a child. Bereaved parents and grandparents are welcome regardless of age. For more information visit compassionatefriends.org. 

     

    The Great Books discussion group is now called Mesa Readers. The group meets from 1 to 3:30 p.m. on the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Mesa Public Library. The group chooses selections that interest its members and selects books and short stories that meet participants’ choices. All are welcome. For more information, call Mary Cernicek at 662-7100.

  • Assets in Action: Donate supplies at the upcoming open houses

     

    As we come to the time for open house at the high school and middle school levels, I encourage you to attend and see everything the sites have available.

    On occasion, I hear parents say that they have attended them in the past and know everything they need to know about the schools.

    As each student is different, there is so much new to learn about, things to see and people to meet.

    If you haven’t been to the middle school yet, you are in for a treat. You’ll have a chance to roam the halls and see how much has truly changed for the Hawks.

    The high school has so much in store too, new staff members, new programs and so much to offer students each and every year.

  • This week at PEEC: Mexican culture and Science on Tap

     

    Mexico is one of the most biologically and culturally diverse countries in the world. These two categories, culture and nature, have gone hand-in-hand throughout history in Mexico: nature being fundamental to Mexican cultural development, and vice versa. There will be a free presentation 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Pajarito Environmental Education Center. 

    Two interns from Mexico, currently working at Bandelier, will take you back in time for an overview of how Mexican culture has changed throughout the years in its relationship with nature. The presentation will explore the impact of modern society on biodiversity, as well as outline some recent conservation efforts to save the natural beauty of Mexico.

  • Nation’s greatest number of artists, writers, performers found in Santa Fe

     

    Someone inside the administration gets the notion that life and economics are complicated and understanding might come from a thorough, if expensive, look at what is and is not happening. The result is a new report from the Department of Cultural Affairs, “Building on the Past, Facing the Future: Renewing the Creative Economy of New Mexico.” 

    Summarizing the Cultural Affairs report will take at least one more column. Before starting, a much smaller scale summary deserves applause. The summer issue of “New Mexico Earth Matters,” the newsletter of the Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources, reviews the role of geology in the state’s future. Topics include water, energy, mining, geologic hazards and induced seismicity.

  • Fix issues before legalizing pot

     

    Good thing the Legislature didn’t pass that marijuana proposal.

    The proposal, introduced in the 2014 session, was a constitutional amendment to legalize marijuana, which would have been submitted to the voters in the upcoming election. 

    The reasons to legalize marijuana are compelling: removing power from criminal cartels, sparing young people the stigma of criminal records and simply facing the reality that pot is here to stay.

    But New Mexico is not ready.

  • 'Topes continue their struggles

    The Albuquerque Isotopes continued their limp to the finish of the 2014 season Monday with a loss in the second game of their series against Oklahoma City.
    The Isotopes were shut out against Oklahoma City’s RedHawks 3-0. A quartet of RedHawks pitchers combined to hold the Isotopes to six hits for the game.
    Albuquerque’s Matt Magill (7-6) and Bruce Billings, the only two pitchers to make appearances for the team Monday, also allowed just six combined hits. But Oklahoma City scored twice in the bottom of the eighth on a walk to force in a run and a sacrifice fly.
    Magill allowed just one earned run in 5-2/3 innings.
    With Monday’s loss, the Isotopes (59-77) have dropped three straight contests and four of their last five. For the month of August, they are 6-18.
    The Isotopes will play their final two road games of the season today and Wednesday.
    Thursday, Albuquerque will return home for the final three games of its season. It will face the Las Vegas 51s Thursday, Friday and Sunday to close out the year.
    The 51s have already already clinched the Pacific Southern division’s championship and will advance to the 2014 PCL playoffs.

    Pederson joins exclusive club