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Today's News

  • Man who died in Yellowstone in 2017 was looking for Fenn’s treasure

     

    BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A 53-year-old Illinois man who fell to his death in Yellowstone National Park last year was looking for a supposed hidden cache of gold and jewels.

    KULR-TV reports that Jeff Murphy of Batavia, Illinois, was looking for the treasurer that antiquities dealer Forrest Fenn says he stashed somewhere in the Rocky Mountains several years ago.

    The investigation by Yellowstone officials into Murphy’s death was kept private, but KULR obtained it through a Freedom of Information Act request.

    The investigative report reveals Murphy’s wife told park authorities that Murphy was looking for the treasure when she called to report him missing.

    Murphy’s body was found June 9, 2017.  He had fallen about 500 feet down a steep slope.

    The report ruled the death an accident.

  • Hungrytown to perform at Fuller Lodge

     

    The Los Alamos County Library System will present the celebrated acoustic duo Hungrytown at 6:30 p.m. March 6 at the Fuller Lodge Art Center, 2132 Central Ave. 

     

    Last July, they returned from a successful six-and-a-half-month tour of the US, UK and New Zealand, covering over 16,000 miles in the U.S. 

    Hungrytown is currently on a four-month tour of the American south and southwest.

    Vermonters Rebecca Hall and Ken Anderson, who make up Hungrytown, have been touring professionally for nearly 15 years. 

    Hungrytown’s songs and music have appeared in numerous television programs, including IFC’s “Portlandia,” Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show” and Neftlix’s new comedy, Lady Dynamite,” as well as various documentaries and major sporting events ranging from NASCAR to Hockey Night in Canada.

    Their third and latest album, “Further West,” made the top 10 on the American Folk DJ charts for two months, and at least 14 “Best of the year” lists. 

  • Lecture on fake news set for Feb. 26

     Journalist and author James McGrath Morris will be the guest speaker at the monthly Voices of Los Alamos progressive advocacy meeting at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 26 at the Unitarian Church, 1738 N. Sage St.

    Morris will speak on “Journalism Ethics and the War over Fake News: A Guide for Citizens Wanting to be Media Literate.”

    “Media literacy is not a matter of ideology, but is rather a skill,” said Morris. “The recent and far-reaching changes in journalism, however, require more from citizens who want remained engaged in civic life.”

    The evening presentation will focus on the development of the mass media, look at how fake news has been part of the media for more than a century, discuss the ethics of journalism, and provide insights on ways to evaluate news. 

    “There are plenty of simple and easy ways citizens can remain in touch with events today despite the worry about so-called ‘fake news,’” Morris said.

  • LA Community Winds to present ‘Joyride! A Journey in Music’ Saturday at Crossroads Bible Church

     

    The Los Alamos Community Winds will host “Joyride! A Journey in Music” Saturday at Crossroads Bible Church.

    LACW, an amateur wind ensemble formed by members of the greater Los Alamos community, will perform several popular selections such as Rimsky-Korsakov’s “Scheherazade, op. 35 - IV. The Thief of Baghdad,” Franz von Suppé’s “Light Cavalry Overture,” and Percy Aldridge Grainger’s “Irish Tune from County Derry” and Shepherd’s “Hey.” 

    The Winds will also showcase several obscure pieces such as “On Parade,” by John Philip Sousa, Michael Markowski’s “Joyride,” Robert W. Smith’s “Songs of Sailor and Sea,” and Leonard Bernstein’s “Slava!” 

    In agreement with the title of the concert, the program provides a journey in music through the inclusion of operettas, symphonic suites, folk tunes and marches. 

  • Community Calendar

     

    TODAY

    Today- March 14 —
    Galactic Adventurers
    from 1-3 p.m. at the Nature Center. Explore stars, planets, robots, satellites, and solar systems with PEEC! This four-session class is for upper elementary age (third- sixth-grade) and meets every Wednesday. Cost is $75 for non-members, $60 for PEEC members. 

     

    Science on Tap at 5:30 p.m. at UnQuarked Wine Room, 145 Central Park Square. Join the Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Jennifer Harris, with the lab’s Biosecurity and Public Health group, as she takes you through the research being carried out at the laboratory in this very important field. 

    THURSDAY

    Coffee and Connections at 10 a.m. at Ruby K’s Bagel Café. Come join the group for an hour of caffeine and networking. Coffee Connection is a fun, monthly morning networking event for chamber members only. It’s not just coffee; it’s about fostering relationships and building up a strong professional network.

    FRIDAY

  • Time to talk about difficult subject of gun control

     

    Ithink you should know that my deadline for writing is well before you receive the paper on Wednesday. So needless to say, I feel like I need to comment on the events last week, in Parkland, Florida.

     

    As a nation, we will never come to agreement on gun control. I believe that the issue of mental health is too difficult of topic to tackle in a short-term solutions kind of way.

    So, when I hear the statements made by so many after a shooting that, “Now isn’t the time to talk, it’s a time to heal,” we have to realize that it happens so often that we are never talking about it.

    If that is the case, then I say let’s change the conversation! Let us look at it from a perspective at 180 degrees. What school is doing something that is making a shift in the area of bullying? Someone, somewhere is doing this work at gold standard level. If that is the case, then I call on all media outlets to sing their praises again and again.

  • Wanted by the IOC: A city to host the 2026 Winter Olympics

    PYEONGCHANG, South Korea — Wanted: A city to host the 2026 Winter Olympics.

    Getting bidders for the Olympics used to be easy. But no longer, and particularly for the Winter Games.

    Six European cities pulled out of official bids or possible bids when the IOC sought candidates a few years ago for the 2022 Winter Olympics.

    Cities balked over soaring costs, political unrest or a lack of public support as expressed in referendums.

    That left the IOC with only two proposals, both from authoritarian governments that backed cities devoid of winter sports traditions: Almaty, Kazakhstan, and Beijing, China.

    Beijing narrowly won, but that set off alarms at IOC headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland.

    “The 2022 (bidding) certainly highlighted the problems we were facing in attracting cities, particularly winter cities,” IOC member and former vice president John Coates said. “We had to do something to address the cost of the games. Increased costs have forced our hand.”

    Coates said the International Olympic Committee is doing a “total rethink” over the way the games are presented to potential bidders, and how they’re sold to the public.

  • Cosgrove named UNM acting coach

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Defensive coordinator Kevin Cosgrove will serve as acting football coach for New Mexico while head coach Bob Davie serves a 30-day suspension.

    Athletic Director Eddie Nunez announced the appointment of Cosgrove as acting coach on Friday, a day after university President announced that Davie’s suspension will begin Saturday.

    Abdallah announced the suspension last week after the school released the results of two recent investigations involving Davie and the football program.

    The investigations examined whether Davie and his coaching staff interfered with criminal investigations or misconduct cases involving players.

    UNM’s Board of Regents decided Tuesday not to accept Davie’s appeal of the suspension.

    Davie is two seasons into a six-year contract that runs through the 2021 season and pays him $822,690 annually, not including bonuses and incentives.

  • Atomic Tumblers dominate at invitational

    The Los Alamos Atomic Tumblers traveled to Albuquerque to compete at the Albuquerque School of Gymnastics, in their annual Black and White Invitational. Over 70 bronze and silver gymnasts competed on Friday night, while gold, platinum and diamond gymnasts competed on Saturday.

    Maya Graves scored the highest all around total of all Bronze competitors, with a 37.25, scoring 9 or above and taking the gold medal on all four events. The last time a LASG gymnast scored this high was Brianna Fryer in a JO level 7 meet last year.

    In the bronze division youngest division, Rafaela Rocha earned three gold medals, in the all-around, the bars and on the floor. She also earned a bronze on the vault.

    Anna Simakov was the standout in the youth division earning a gold on the floor and the bars, and a silver in the all-around and on the beam. She also earned a bronze on the vault.

    In the junior’s division, Meera Nadiga earned gold on the bars, finished with a silver on the vault and finished in a tie for silver in the all-around.  

    In the silver competition Holly Martinez was Los Alamos’ high scorer, earning a gold on the bars and the vault, and finishing with silver on the floor and in the all-around competing in the child’s division.

  • Mother, daughter boxers in West Texas battle for victories

    EL PASO, Texas — The sacrifice is impossible to measure as the hours pile upon hours, the sweat fills bucket after bucket and even a bit of blood and possibly a tear or two accumulate in the hard knock, unforgiving journey that is boxing.

    But both the pain and the joy are best when shared. And no one can share it like daughter and mother and grandmother. The sport has slowly, gradually built an indelible bond between three generations.

    The El Paso Times reports Kayla Gomez is but 14 years old, just an eighth-grade student at Bel Air Middle School. But she is already a five year veteran of the demanding sport of boxing and she has already won six national championships and earned a spot on the U.S. National Team. She dreams of going to the Olympics and then going pro.

    Crystal Aceves is 32 and is also a five year veteran of the sport ... bringing her daughter Kayla with her when they decided to get serious about boxing. And no sport demands that you be serious more than the sweet science. Aceves has competed in three national tournaments and has two-second place finishes and one-third place.

    Cindy Aceves is mother and grandmother and coach and travel partner and confidant for the two in their fistic quest.