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Today's News

  • You can trust scientific research reports … we hope

    A recent story in the Chronicle of Higher Education suggests that Michael LaCour, a UCLA graduate student, has fabricated data for another journal article.
    Science magazine has retracted the article, due to “the misrepresentation of survey incentives, the false sponsorship statement, and LaCour’s inability to produce original data.” Unfortunately, this is only the latest in a long string of integrity issues in research publications.
    The scary reality, though, is not the articles that have been found to be questionable, but the possibility of many other fabricated articles that have not been discovered and retracted.
    Meanwhile, John Bohannon intentionally published some weak and questionable findings related to chocolate just to demonstrate how quickly non-refereed journals will snatch up research. He claims, “I fooled millions into thinking chocolate helps weight loss.” Sign me up!
    The Office of Research Integrity oversees integrity on behalf of the Secretary of Health and Human Services. They are currently investigating 50 cases of research misconduct.
    Granted, the vast majority of published research is carefully reviewed and published with full integrity (we think). Nevertheless, one should be properly skeptical of the scientific claims. How can we be more informed consumers of research claims?

  • Pesticides are destroying some of Earth's creatures

    “What’s past is prologue,” Shakespeare said. How many times do we have to combat the use of pesticides?
    Rachel Carson’s lessons in “Silent Spring” must be revisited today. The chemical industry has become stronger in protecting and increasing its use of pesticides and poisons.
    Now, two of the agro giants, Dow and Monsanto, are battling each other’s products to kill super weeds, which were created by the use of pesticides in the first place.
    Hummingbirds, as well as other pollinators, are vital to our ecosystem. Bees, butterflies, bats, wasps, beetles, the air and some mammals help pollinate our flowers and plant foods.
    Their disappearance from the Earth is monstrous and is due in large part to the use of pesticides.
    Because some Los Alamos residents are reporting the absence or dwindling numbers of hummingbirds, it is important to do what we can to reduce pesticide use.
    Mary Deinilein, an education specialist at the Smithsonian National Zoo Migratory Bird Center explains how these chemicals affect non-targeted pests.
    These are some possible direct effects on survival and/or reproduction:

  • Review: Book chronicles Hudson’s battle at Iwo Jima

    One of Los Alamos’ greatest living treasures has a long story to tell about World War II.
    Bill Hudson turned 90 years old in May and continues to fill the community with knowledge of a past long gone but never forgotten.
    The recently released book, “Fighting the Unbeatable Foe,” by Karen Tallentire, chronicles Hudson’s time on the island of Iwo Jima in graphic detail.
    Hudson, born William Alfred Hudson, was raised in Manhattan and comes from a long line of military men, stemming back to his great-grandfather, Robert Jefferson Hudson, who fought in the Confederate Army during the Civil War.
    His father William Alonzo Hudson fought during World War I for the Navy. His brother served in the Army from 1947-1948. His sons also served in the military. His son, William James Hudson, was in the Navy from 1969-1973 and Ty Manon Hudson was a Marine from 1981-1987.
    Hudson himself joined the Marines in 1943 when he reached age 18. He said it was better that he volunteered to join the Corps than be drafted into the Army.
    Before enlisting, he was clean living and athletic and hung around people of the same likes. He was a non-smoker and non-drinker.

  • Carothers on his way to country music success

    It has been a banner year for former Los Alamos resident James Carothers and his family.
    After landing a booking agent in Nashville, Tennessee, in January, he is one step closer to becoming a bona fide country music artist.
    Carrie Moore-Reed from Third Coast Talent is his agent, while his wife, Jill, has been assisting with booking venues for James.
    “It’s an uphill battle for any artist,” Jill Carothers said.
    James opens for bands in the Nashville area in country-themed bars and clubs. A possible gig in Washington state is in the works, but has not been finalized.
    In April, he played a Battle of the Bands at The Crazy Bull in Macon, Georgia. That performance is available on YouTube. He also plays at the Bluebird Café in Nashville.
    James scored a full-time gig at the start of the summer when he walked into the George Jones Museum and Entertainment Complex.
    The four-story location houses a museum, bar and restaurant, and an additional rooftop terrace bar that over looks the Cumberland River and the Tennessee Titans football stadium.
    The facility makes its own moonshine on the premises, as well.
    James first heard of an opening through one of his current band members who thought he would be a good fit for the gig.

  • Retirement won’t stop Powell from volunteering

    Irene Powell has been a volunteer at many places around Los Alamos, predominately as the director of the Los Alamos Volunteer Association (LAVA), which she retired from earlier this month.
    Although she said she loves volunteering, “it was time to retire.”
    She now wants to devote her time to traveling. Powell and her family recently returned from a trip to the Grand Canyon, which occurred immediately after her last day as LAVA’s director.
    She is not, however, giving up volunteering entirely. She remains active at United Church and the Red Cross.
    The Betty Ehart Senior Center held a Hawaiian-themed going away party for Powell on Aug. 6.
    “I have always felt strongly about volunteer work. She had worked as the volunteer director for Los Alamos Retired and Senior Organization the past nine years, which she said was a wonderful job.
    “Helping seniors find volunteer opportunities with nonprofits was a very rewarding occupation,” she said. “I also enjoyed working with the staff there at the Betty Ehart Senior Center. They are very dedicated to the seniors in this community.”

  • LAHS senior blends art, design with science

    Los Alamos has a slew of high school students who have accomplished much in their young lives — EliseAnne Koskelo is one of them.
    Last school year, as a junior at Los Alamos High School, Koskelo was the recipient of several prestigious awards for her work in art, design and science.
    Back in December, Koskelo was awarded a Merit designation from the National Young Arts Foundation for her work blending art and science. Her portfolio was chosen from more that 11,000 applications from across the United States.
    As one of 700 winners of this award, Koskelo travelled to New York City recently to attend master classes in the field of art and design. She received a travel scholarship from the Emily Bradley Memorial Fund and she thanks Linda Zwick and family for their support of education in the arts.
    Koskelo said she first heard about Young Arts through LAHS teacher Margo Batha. “When I applied, I submitted a portfolio which contained pictures and descriptions of my architectural, engineering and fashion design works,” Koskelo said. “I also wrote an essay about the power of design, focusing on my reaction to the Korean War Memorial in Washington, D.C.”
    She was a part of the DuPont essay contest, which she discovered Googling various science competitions.

  • DPU's invisible employees

    Senior Hydroelectric Maintenance Technicians Joel Kennedy and Bobby Trujillo have been with the Los Alamos County Department of Public Utilities 18 and 15 years respectively, and Hydroelectric Plant Engineer Adam Cooper joined the team 11 years ago.
    But, on the chance they have reason to visit the department, their fellow employees ask if they are new on the job.
    That is because this crew operates the county’s two hydroelectric plants, located at the El Vado and Abiquiu dams.
    “Some of the citizens don’t even know that there are hydroelectric plants in the state, much less that Los Alamos owns two out of four,” Cooper said.
    The county’s two plants are smaller than the hydro plants at Elephant Butte and Navajo dams, but this three-man team has a full time job keeping them running.
    “These poor guys are just up here, and they are just doing everything, and pretty much invisible to the rest of the county, and really even to the citizens,” said DPU Public Relations Manager Julie Williams-Hill.
    According to Cooper, there is not a typical day.
    “There is no real standard day, which I really like. I don’t like monotony,” Cooper said.

  • Former Los Alamos resident honored with third Murrow award

    Lee Powell, a former Los Alamos resident, has been named the winner of the Edward R. Murrow Award, considered one of the biggest awards in the broadcast news world.
    For Powell, three times is the charm.
    Powell works as a video journalist for The Washington Post.
    “For a newspaper, it shows our work can stand alongside other papers like The New York Times,” Powell said.
    His first win was for a compilation of pieces, as well as a feature that was about a fake ski slope in Virginia. He was working as a broadcast reporter for The Associated Press at the time, in 2011 and 2012 respectively.
    This upcoming award is for also writing a collection of stories from 2014 — about a newspaper publisher, a D-Day veteran and a collector of one of the largest pinball collections around.
    Powell was born in Dallas and moved to Los Alamos in 1989 while in the seventh grade. His mother, Irene, recently retired from being the director of the Los Alamos Volunteer Association and his father, David, worked for the Los Alamos National Laboratory for many years.
    Powell is a 1994 graduate from Los Alamos High School.
    He went onto college in Wheaton College in Illinois, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in political science.

  • 'Topper girls soccer drops opener Saturday

    The Los Alamos girls soccer team lost its opening day game Saturday at Sullivan Field to a tough opponent.

    Los Alamos couldn't get enough going offensively to counteract a couple of critical miscues in the back against the Farmington Scorpions. The Scorpions prevailed 3-1.

    Hailey Kelley scored two of the three goals for the Scorpions (1-0), one in each half, to key the victory.

    Los Alamos' only goal came midway through the second half when Sienna Ahlers chugged her way through the Farmington back line and went across the goal mouth for the first goal of the Hilltoppers' 2015 season.

    Los Alamos (0-1) plays at Bosque School Tuesday afternoon.

    More information on Saturday's contest will be in Wednesday's Los Alamos Monitor.

  • On Schedule 8-23-15

    Monday
    Football: St. Pius X at Los Alamos, junior varsity, 4:30 p.m.

    Tuesday
    Girls Soccer: Los Alamos at Bosque, varsity, 3 p.m.

    Boys Soccer: Los Alamos at Bosque, varsity, 5 p.m.

    Thursday
    Girls Soccer: Moriarty at Los Alamos, varsity, 5 p.m.

    Boys Soccer: Moriarty at Los Alamos, junior varsity, 3 p.m.
    Friday
    Football: Los Alamos at Pojoaque, varsity, 7 p.m.

    Boys Soccer: Clovis at Los Alamos, varsity, 9 a.m.

    Saturday
    Boys Soccer: TBD at Los Alamos, varsity, TBD

    Boys Soccer: Los Alamos at Santa Fe Prep, junior varsity, 1 p.m.