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Today's News

  • Interior chief urges shrinking 4 national monuments in West

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke is recommending that four large national monuments in the West be reduced in size, potentially opening up hundreds of thousands of acres of land revered for natural beauty and historical significance to mining, logging and other development.

    Zinke's recommendation, revealed in a leaked memo submitted to the White House, prompted an outcry from environmental groups who promised to take the Trump administration to court to block the moves.

    The Interior secretary's plan would scale back two huge Utah monuments — Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante — along with Nevada's Gold Butte and Oregon's Cascade-Siskiyou. The monuments encompass more than 3.6 million acres — an area larger than Connecticut — and were created by Democratic administrations under a century-old law that allows presidents to protect sites considered historic, geographically or culturally important.

    Zinke's plan also would allow logging at a newly designated monument in Maine and urges more grazing, hunting and fishing at two sites in New Mexico. It also calls for a new assessment of border-safety risks at a monument in southern New Mexico.

  • Contract extended for management of US nuclear dump

    CARLSBAD (AP) — The U.S. Department of Energy has extended a contract for the management of the government's only underground nuclear waste repository that will allow the Nuclear Waste Partnership to continue operating the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad through September 2020.

    WIPP resumed operations earlier this year following a shutdown that followed a 2014 radiation release caused by inappropriate packaging of waste by workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    The extension of the contract with Nuclear Waste Partnership will include a new safety focus and cost incentives. It's good through Sept. 30, 2020, and can be extended beyond that.

    A federal audit this week found that WIPP doesn't have enough space for radioactive tools, clothing and other debris left over from decades of bomb-making and research.
     

  • Endangered Mexican wolf killed following livestock attacks

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — An endangered Mexican gray wolf has been killed by federal employees after a Native American tribe requested the animal be removed from the wild in the wake of a string of cattle deaths near the Arizona-New Mexico border.

    The death of the female wolf marks the first time in a decade that efforts by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to curb livestock attacks by wolves has had lethal consequences for one of the predators.

    The decision to remove the member of the Diamond Pack was first made in June after three calves were killed over several days, sparking concern among wildlife managers about what they described as an unacceptable pattern of predation.

    An investigation determined the female wolf was likely the culprit based on GPS and radio telemetry tracking, according to documents obtained Thursday by The Associated Press.

    Another calf was killed in July, prompting the White Mountain Apache Tribe to call for the removal. That was followed by one confirmed kill and another probable kill by members of the pack on national forest land adjacent to the reservation.

    Fish and Wildlife Service Regional Director Benjamin Tuggle issued another order in August calling for the wolf's removal by the most expeditious means possible.

  • Football contiues road dominance

    The Los Alamos High School varsity football teams continued its dominant road play last weekend, defeating Grants High School 37-0 at Port of the Pirates Stadium.

    This was the team’s second straight road win, and by an identical shutout score as their week one win over Pojoaque High School.

    Though the defense impressed, it was the offense that got the Hilltoppers going early.

    After forcing a turnover on downs on the first Grants possession, the Hilltoppers offense marched right down the field and scored with ease, as senior running back Ryan McNeil forced his way into the end zone from six yards out, as LAHS took a 7-0 lead.

    They would stretch that lead to 14-0 on their next drive, as the running game of the Hilltoppers could not be stopped.

    After once again running their way the length of the field, LAHS junior quarterback Dylan Irish snuck his way into the end zone from three yards out, scoring their second touchdown of the first quarter.

    The defense made its first big play of the game on the next Grants possession, forcing a fumble and giving possession back to the Hilltopper offense. They did not waste the opportunity, as senior running back Jack Stewart ran the ball in from three yards out and stretched the lead to 21-0.

  • WR Baptist Church says farewell to Pastor Chuck

    White Rock Baptist Church said farewell to Pastor Chuck McCullough on Sept. 10 with an ice-cream social.
    Pastor Chuck, as he was called fondly by members of the congregation, had been senior pastor at White Rock Baptist Church since July 1, 1986.

    McCullough said he felt God had been leading him to leave the church because that is what is best for the church. He had been pastor of White Rock Baptist Church for 31 years. The church has flourished under his leadership, but he said he was excited about where God will lead the church in the future.

    White Rock Baptist was started in 1969 as a mission outreach from First Baptist Church in Los Alamos.

    In 1970, the new church bought property along State Road 4, and in 1972 the first church building was completed on the property. A second building was completed in 1978. In August 1997, a sewer backup in a county line caused a major flood in the building on Sunday morning.

    The old building had to be decontaminated.

  • Stidhams mark 30 years at LA Church of Christ

    In 1987 Ronald Reagan was in his last year as president of the United States, the Minnesota Twins won the World Series, and a gallon of gasoline cost 89 cents.

    In August of that year, Timothy D. Stidham and his wife Tanya, moved with their four children to Los Alamos from Sherman, Texas. And so began what would be 30 years of service to the Los Alamos Church of Christ. Thirty years and counting.

    The church will honor the Stidhams with a banquet at Fuller Lodge on Monday. Besides the meal, present and former church members will share memories and the Stidhams’ son Tony will present a commemorative slide show. In appreciation for their longtime service, the church is also sending the Stidhams on a Caribbean cruise.

    Tim began at the church as youth minister and served in that capacity for five years. In 1992 he became pulpit minister and has worked in that capacity ever since. Tanya has served as women’s minister since 2000. Their second son Tony is currently youth minister for the church, a position he has held since August, 2011.

    The couple met in Guam when their fathers were stationed there in the military. They have been married 43 years.

  • LAPS Foundation to host fundraiser Oct. 14

    The Los Alamos Public Schools Foundation has announced that it will hold its popular fundraiser, Taste of Knowledge at 5:30 p.m. Oct. 14 at the old De Colores restaurant location. The theme this year is “Experience the Food and Wine of Spain.”

    Pig+Fig’s Chef Laura Crucet will create scrumptious Spanish tapas, which will be paired with unique boutique Spanish wines.

    Representatives from Favorite Brands and Jose Pastor Selections will talk about the different wine producing regions of Spain and what wines are produced there. During the tasting, local jazz band The Ryan Finn Quartet will entertain with live music. Ryan Finn is the Los Alamos Middle School Band instructor, whose classroom benefitted from a $25,000 makeover facilitated by the LAPS Foundation in the summer of 2016.

    As this is a fundraiser benefiting Los Alamos Public Schools’ teachers, staff, students and facilities, the LAPS Foundation is including elements from many talented Los Alamos students. LAHS Culinary Arts students will prepare the food under the supervision of Chef Laura Crucet, while LAHS Art Club members will dress as Spanish waiters and help out during the event. Several DALA and LAHS dancers will perform Spanish-themed dances, and Key Club and Hilltalkers members have volunteered to help with the event, as well.

  • Time to deal with Dodd Frank bill

    The New York Times on an upcoming Treasury Department report on the Dodd-Frank financial oversight bill expected to propose lighter regulation for financial firms other than banks:

    Among the most appalling aspects of the financial collapse nine years ago was that no matter how reckless and predatory big financial institutions had been, they had grown so big and so interconnected that the federal government found itself forced to prop them up to avoid failures that would wreck the economy. The resulting bailouts, which included billions of dollars in bonuses for executives responsible for the fiasco, provoked deep public anger and became a rallying cry for populists on the right and the left.

    To reduce the risks from too-big-to-fail institutions, Congress in 2010 passed the Dodd-Frank financial oversight bill. But ever since, even as the stock market soared, wages stagnated and the victims of predatory lenders continued to struggle, Wall Street’s champions have demanded an end to Dodd-Frank’s regulations.

    Step by step, the Trump administration has made it clear that it is on their side, that Wall Street need have no real concern about Dodd-Frank’s provisions and that the lessons of the financial crisis will be ignored.

  • Volleyball taken down by Santa Fe

    The early season struggles of the Los Alamos High School varsity volleyball team continued Wednesday evening, as they fell at home to Santa Fe High School 3-1.

    It was clear from the start that the Hilltoppers would have a tough time containing the attackers of Santa Fe, as the sound of the ball hitting the ground after a spike from the Demons boomed throughout the gym time after time.

    Santa Fe controlled much of the first set, jumping out to a 14-9 lead and never looking back. Despite the Hilltoppers’ attempt to come back late in the set, it was not enough. Santa Fe took the first set 25-18.

    Emme Segler was the top finisher for LAHS in the first set, as she recorded three kills. Kimberly McKinley, Natalie Gallegos and Elodie Theillez each recorded two of their own in the set.

    The Hilltoppers came out as an inspired group in the second set. Despite falling behind early, they kept fighting and evened the score at 7-7.

    LAHS then went on a run that gave them an 11-7 lead, which forced Santa Fe to take a timeout.

    The Hilltoppers did not slow down after that, however, extending their lead to 19-13. Though the Demons made it close, LAHS escaped the second set with a 25-19 victory, evening the match 1-1.

  • Deal or no deal? ‘Dreamers’ wait as Trump, lawmakers joust

    BY ERICA WERNER AND JILL COLVIN
    Associated Press

    WASHINGTON — The fate of 800,000 young immigrants hung in the balance Thursday as top lawmakers, White House officials and President Donald Trump himself squabbled over whether an agreement had been struck to protect them — and if so, exactly what it was.

    In the face of an intense backlash from conservatives inside the Capitol and out, Speaker Paul Ryan and other GOP House members adamantly insisted that there was no agreement to enshrine protections for the immigrants brought to America as children and now here illegally.

    John Cornyn of Texas, the No. 2 Senate Republican, put it this way: There was “a deal to make a deal.”

    Trump himself said he was “fairly close” to an agreement that could protect the young “Dreamers” while also adding border security, as long as his long-promised wall with Mexico was also separately addressed. Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer — whose dinner with Trump Wednesday night was at the heart of the controversy — insisted there was discussion and even agreement on legislation that would offer eventual citizenship to the immigrants in question.