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Today's News

  • Church listings 4-24-15

    Baha’i Faith
    For information, email losalamosla@gmail.com. For general information, call the Baha’i Faith phone at 1-800-228-6483.
    Bethlehem Lutheran
    Bethlehem Evangelical Lutheran Church, a member of the ELCA, is located at 2390 North Road, 662-5151; see a map at bethluth.com. The Eucharist is celebrated each Sunday at 8:15 a.m. and 11 a.m., with coffee and doughnuts served between services during our Education Hour of classes for all ages. The preaching is biblical by our Pastors Bruce Kuenzel and Nicolé Ferry, the music is lively, children are welcome and abundant, and a well-staffed nursery is provided. All are welcome! Come Join the Family!
    Bryce Ave. Presbyterian
    The church is located at 3333 Bryce Ave. The Rev. Henry Fernandez preaches, bapca.org, info@bapca.org. For information, call 672-3364.
    Calvary Chapel
    Sunday school classes for all ages at 9:15 a.m. At 10:30 a.m., worship and a study of the Biblical Jesus as He relates to people in our look at the Gospel of Exodus.  
    The Christian Church
    92 East Road, 662-6468, lachristian.org. 9-10 a.m. Sunday school; 10-10:30 a.m. Coffee Fellowship; 10:30 a.m. Worship Service. Rev. Doug Partin, Assoc. Rev. Ben Partin.
    Christian Science
    1725 17th St. 662-5057.
    Church of Christ

  • Concern about environment began with creation

    “Does the Bible have anything to say about the plastic bag ban debate?” — Eve

    Unfortunately, the Bible was written long before plastic bags existed; indeed, long before grocery stores and shopping were invented! Thus, there can be no direct comment from Scripture on the topic.
    Fortunately, this question provides an excellent example of how the ancient Book may speak, even to what some might consider mundane and inconsequential issues.  
    The Bible portrays a living God who is interested in humans and human affairs. Because we assume He cares about how we live our life, we may also assume that even when there are no specific instructions given in His Book, there are broad principles of truth that are related in some fashion.
    Clearly, the debate on this issue revolves around several topics: care for the environment, energy, use of limited resources and waste. Personal freedom, respect for individual choice and the power of the state to coerce also arise here.
    The Bible addresses the environment. In the creation account (Ge. 1:28-30) the earth is declared to be good. Furthermore, the world is part of the theological big picture: it reveals the invisible attributes of God (Ro. 1:20) and will somehow participate in His redemptive plan (Ro. 8:19-22).

  • A dream come true: An astronomy buff visits new nature center

    Yesterday Helen Cake and Richard Sokoloff reminded me that the new Nature Center (Pajarito Environmental Education — PEEC) was opening at 2 p.m. I got there late due to working on my latest book reprint order, but what a big crowd and what a beautiful nature experience with gorgeous view over the canyon, and best of all, the planetarium.
    Many years ago in Michigan, after finding the H.A. Rey book, “The Stars,” then standing on frozen McKane Lake with my mom, (Grandma Ashley), listening to the rumbling of the ice under pure black skies, (with quick runs inside to get warm), we found the Lion, the Big Do, and even the Little Dog, plus the Big Hunter Orion with his triple star belt. I have been hooked on star gazing ever since!
    I co-sponsored the Los Alamos High School Astronomy Club for many years and also did UNM-LA’s astronomy outdoor lab for beginning Astronomy. I took LAHS astronomy kids to planetariums and observatories in Chicago, Denver, Hutchinson, Kansas, Flagstaff, Arizona, Kitt Peak, Arizona, Los Angeles, San Diego and The Very Large Array near Socorro in New Mexico. The out-of-state trips were by Amtrak, and we got more members for the California trip by including Disneyland.

  • GMO — giving my opinion

    Last year, my cousin purchased a Jack Russell Terrier.
    Well, that’s what he thought he was buying.
    It turned out that it was a genetically modified crossbreed between a Miniature Schnauzer, an African wildebeest and a slightly overripe acorn squash.
    He can’t help but love the creature, and on the positive side the cute little vegetable does keep the family supplied in fresh milk, but the carpet cleaning bills are killing him.
    Genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, are a hot topic of debate and the arguments for and against them span from the inane to the insane. Technically speaking, one could claim that any intervention on man’s part to produce “genetic forks” in the pathways of evolution constitutes a GMO.
    Now, GMOs aren’t necessarily bad. Most vegetables we enjoy wouldn’t exist in the form we know them if not for selective breeding. Carrots would look more like horseradish roots, corn like a fat grass, potatoes like diseased mummified toads, and Chihuahuas would look like ... well, anything other than a Chihuahua.
    OK, I hear you arguing that Chihuahuas aren’t vegetables. Clearly, you’ve never owned one!

  • Isotopes offense stifled in loss to Rainiers

    Cold and wet conditions at Cheney Stadium in Tacoma, Wash., cooled the Albuquerque Isotopes (9-6) offense off Thursday evening. The Tacoma Rainiers (5-10) chipped a 3-0 victory away from the Isotopes.
    Albuquerque will have a chance to win its second series, and first on the road, Friday night.

    Left-handed pitchers Chris Rusin for the Isotopes and Mike Montgomery for the Rainiers cruised through the early innings without allowing a single hit. It wasn’t until the bottom of the third when Tacoma’s Shawn O’Malley singled home a run that either team could gain an advantage. Albuquerque was held hitless until sixth when Brandon Barnes poked a leadoff double into the left field corner. The Isotopes couldn’t move him around, and the Rainiers would add another run in the bottom of the sixth before tacking on another in the eighth.

    Shortstop Cristhian Adames has been tearing the cover off the ball during his last 12 games. After a 1-for-3 performance on Thursday, he now has 18 hits during that 12-game stretch, including a team-leading seven multi-hit performances. He also has nine runs scored, three doubles, two homers, seven RBI, six walks and only three strikeouts. Adames is batting .409.

  • Sports Briefs 4-24-15

    Pace race season here
    The Atomic City Road Runners club will meet on Tuesdays at various locations throughout Los Alamos County through early October.
    This week’s race will be held at 6 p.m. on American Spring’s road, which is 1.5 miles from the back gate at the junction of N.M. 4 and N.M. 501. (West Jemez Road) up in the Jemez.
    One and 3-mile courses will be available.
    For more information call 672-1639 or visit atomicrunners.com.

    Hall of fame nominations sought
    The LAHS athletic department is accepting nominations for its 2015 hall of fame class.
    Nomination forms can be found on the LAHS athletic website, or can be picked up in the athletic office. There are three categories for nominations: former athlete, former coach (head, assistant, or volunteer from middle or high school), and a contributor to LAPS athletics.
    A contributor could include, but is not limited to an educator, manager, media, medical, official, trainer, volunteer, athletic director, assistant and volunteer coaches.
    The deadline to nominate people is June 1. The nominees will be notified by Aug. 1.
    A committee has been selected that will review the nominations and select the second class.

  • Atomic Tumblers compete in state championships

    The Los Alamos Atomic Tumblers travelled to Eagle Ridge Gymnastics last month to compete in the men’s New Mexico State Gymnastics Championships.
    Daniel Fryer competed in the level-6 session.
    For the third consecutive year, Fryer qualified for the Region 9 Championships.
    This is his third year competing in United States men’s gymnastics, and his third level of accomplishment.
    During the 2012-2013 season, he won a state championship for his age division in level 4 and qualified for regionals, which were held in Albuquerque that year.
    The next year, he won another state championship in his age division in level 5, qualifying for the regional championships in Salt Lake City.
    This year, he qualified for the level-6 regional championships, which will be held in Colorado Springs at the men’s Olympic Training Center.
    Fryer is finding level 6, which is a fairly advanced level of gymnastics, to be more of a challenge than the previous levels he competed in.
    At the state championships this year, his highest finish earned him a bronze on vault with a 10.10 (receiving some bonus points that are allowed in men’s gymnastics). Fryer finished seventh all-around, taking the final regional qualifying spot.
    He’s looking forward to competing in level 6 again, next year.

  • LA ready to host Española Valley in key games

    The District 2-5A baseball championship will be all but decided on Saturday at Bomber Field.
    The top two teams in the district, Los Alamos and Española Valley, have distanced themselves from the rest of the league, going a combined 12-0 against the rest of the district. Now they’ll square off for the final two times this regular season to see who gets to enter the final stretch of games in the top spot.
    Los Alamos (15-6, 6-1 District 2-5A) will host the district leading Española Valley Sundevils (15-4, 7-0) at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.
    To take over the lead, Los Alamos will need to win both games.
    Española won the first contest between the two teams at home, 4-0. Los Alamos had plenty of chances to score in the game, but couldn’t get a timely hit and ended up leaving nine runners stranded on base, including runners in scoring position in each of the first six innings.
    The ’Toppers have won five straight since then, learning from the loss by being more aggressive at the plate and taking care of business on a daily basis.
    Española pitcher Jesus Chavez, however, has more movement on his balls than anyone Los Alamos had played since then. He should give the ’Toppers a good challenge.

  • Los Alamos Pony Club to host dressage competition on Sunday

    Los Alamos Pony Club will be hosting a dressage competition and Pony Club rally Sunday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the county's North Mesa equestrian facility.

    Organized by Laura Kober, a dressage rider and parent of a Pony Club member, the show is part of the New Mexico Dressage Association's series of schooling (practice) competitions over the year. The show will also feature a qualifying competition for Pony Club members from across the state who wish to qualify to compete in the United States Pony Clubs, Inc. championships later this summer.

    Dressage is an Olympic equestrian sport, involving a specific pattern of movements that horse and rider must perform, demonstrating the elegance and training of the horse and the skill and tact of the rider.

    For more information about Los Alamos Pony Club, which is accepting new members, see http://losalamos.ponyclub.org/wordpress/?page_id=200/?page_id=200

    For information about the New Mexico Dressage Association, see http://www.nmdressage.net/

  • Off the Hill calendar 4-23-15

    Art exhibits
    Albuquerque Academy Student Exhibition. Opening reception 5-7 p.m. Friday at Turner Carroll Gallery, 725 Canyon Road. Exhibit runs through April 29. The first in Turner Carroll’s Emerging Artist program for 2015, the juried exhibition of Albuquerque Academy artwork presents an exceptional body of work by Academy’s 9-12th graders. From more than 270 submissions, a panel of Santa Fe curators, gallerists, artists and critics selected the most compelling 25 works.

    Footprints: The Inspiration and Influence of Allan Houser. Through May 2015 at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, 708 Camino Lejo in Santa Fe.

    Harriette Tsosie, “Linguicide.” Artist talk from 1-2 p.m. Saturday. Show closes on April 27.

    Jock Sturges: Fanny. Show runs until May 23 at photo-eye Gallery.

    “Women’s Work.” Art exhibition featuring 25 top female artists of New Mexico. Show is free to the public and runs through May 15 at the Tarnoff Art Center in Rowe. For more information and directions, visit tarnoffartcenter.org, or call 919-8888.  

    V. Vaughan Solo Exhibit: Welcome the Light. Show runs until April 30 at Act I Gallery in Santa Fe.