.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Making manufacturers: Events aim to inspire next-generation workers

    By Sandy Nelson
    For Finance New Mexico

    Young people can be hard to impress, but students from Albuquerque’s Academy of Trades and Technology (ATTHS) charter school were visibly stoked by a tour of Rader Awning during 2016 Manufacturing Day events.

    Before-and-after shots of the 15 ATTHS students who visited the factory where Rader manufactures awnings, shade panels and fabric products illustrate what can happen when young adults get a close look at the world of manufacturing: a transformation from bored detachment to delighted engagement.

    It’s the kind of transformation that inspires New Mexico Manufacturing Extension Partnership (NM MEP), the organizers and sponsors of local Manufacturing Day, to focus on introducing a fresh generation to careers in advanced manufacturing.

    Closing the gap

  • Fake Indian jewelry by the thousands threaten New Mexico artisans

    Last summer, at the Santo Domingo Pueblo arts and crafts fair, I bought a carved wooden bear from a seller who said he was from Jemez Pueblo. He was sitting with fetish carvers from Zuni Pueblo. Imagine my surprise when I saw a shelf full of the same carved bears across the border in Mexico.

    Recently, U. S. Sen. Tom Udall held field hearings on the issue of counterfeit Native American art. His goal was to hear from artists, experts and law enforcement officials about changes needed in the Indian Arts and Crafts Act of 1990 to better protect both artists and buyers.

    This is not a trivial problem. In the past year, we’ve seen multiple indictments stemming from a federal investigation.

    The quantity of fake Indian jewelry pouring in from Asia is truly staggering. It’s risen to a level (one number used in the hearing was 80 percent ) that will kill our jewelry industry if we let it.

    I was surprised to learn some years ago that New Mexico’s jewelry industry is the fifth or sixth largest in the country.

  • Mayer on changing his live shows: 'I want to be competitive'

    NEW YORK (AP) — John Mayer never relied on multicolored lighting, confetti and pyrotechnics to help him during his live shows, like some of his peers.

    But the singer-songwriter-guitarist wanted to step up his game, and he said watching Drake perform live encouraged him to beef up his stage production and take more risks during his concerts.

    Mayer will launch the second leg of his Search for Everything World Tour on Tuesday in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The new live shows have been a departure for the Grammy winner, who now performs with a colorful and futuristic L.E.D. wall and floor.

    "I wanted to have a really big show. I want to be competitive. I want to be in the world where people are creating bigger and better shows," Mayer said. "I think there's a healthy competition involved in it. I went and saw Drake's show and ... real artists say, 'Wow!' And then they go, '(Expletive).' Right? Because you see something that wows you and as an artist yourself you go, 'I want a little of that.'"

    The 39-year-old recently wrapped a tour with Dead & Company, his supergroup with Grateful Dead's Mickey Hart, Bill Kreutzmann and Bob Weir. His summer tour wraps Sept. 3 in Noblesville, Indiana.

  • County to host horse show July 22

    It’s time for all riders to showcase their equestrian talents in Western and English categories at the annual Los Alamos County Horse Show at Brewer Arena July 22, starting at 9 a.m.
    The Los Alamos County Horse Show offers four age categories (ages 9 and under), 10–13, 14–18 and adult, and many different horsemanship class categories.
    The fees range from $5 per youth class entry, $8 per adult class entry, and $30 per family (four or more participants from immediate family living in the same household).
    Prizes include place ribbons, horse show t-shirts and buckles.
    Pre-registration is through at 7 p.m. Thursday.
    Submit forms to the Parks, Recreation’s Administrative offices at the Aquatic Center.
    For more information, contact the PROS Division at 662-8170, visit the website at losalamosnm.us or email lacrec@lacnm.us.

  • Mountaineers to meet July 25 about Shackleton traverse

    The Los Alamos Mountaineers will meet at 6:45 p.m. July 25 at the Los Alamos Nature Center for a presentation by Rich Spritz, as he shares his experience recreating the Shackleton traverse.
    “Men wanted for hazardous journey. Low wages, bitter cold, long hours of complete darkness. Safe return doubtful. Honor and recognition in event of success,” Spritz said of the adventure.
    The Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914-17 was a Grand Failure, from which Sir Ernest Shackleton emerged as a great leader.
    Spritz took part in a National Geographic mini-expedition to recreate the historic Shackleton traverse of South Georgia for the 100th anniversary. Safe return doubtful.
    Social starts at 6:45 p.m., followed by reports of recent and upcoming trips at 7 p.m. Program starts at 7:30 p.m.

  • MOWW to meet at Sheriff’s Posse Shack Tuesday

    The Military Order of the World Wars will meet Tuesday for its annual picnic.
    The meeting will be in the Los Alamos County Sheriff’s Posse Shack on North Mesa. (Note the change in location for this month’s meeting only.)
    This month’s speaker is Rick Wallace, Ph.D., who will discuss the astronomical significance of the sun, summer solstice and its resulting seasons. He will also talk about eclipses especially the one that will cross the United States on Aug. 21.
    The Posse Shack is on North Mesa Road. Take Diamond Drive east through the Golf Course and straight through the traffic circle and up the hill. Follow the road around for about one mile. The shack is on the left, and there is parking on both sides of the street.
    The meeting will begin with a social period at 6 p.m., followed by a brief business meeting and dinner at 6:25 p.m.
    The presentation will begin at about 7:15 p.m. The Military Order of the World Wars dinner meetings are open to interested citizens for the dinner and program with RSVP, or the program only at no cost. The cost of the dinner is $25 per person.
    Call Eleanor Pinyan, 672-3750 for reservations. A reservation is a commitment to pay. Dinner is scheduled to be Smokin Bear BBQ with appropriate sides.

  • Community Calendar 7-16-17

    TODAY
    Nature Yoga and Trail Run
at 10:30 a.m. at the Nature Center. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center, where you have a great view of nature. Optional: Arrive at 10:30 a.m. to join Christa for a pre-yoga run. Admission: yoga or run for $7/$5 for members; yoga and run for $12/$8 for members.

    Feature Film: From Earth to the Universe at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Enjoy 180 degrees of entertainment. Join us on a colorful and inspiring journey through our universe. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.
    MONDAY
    The New Mexico Alzheimer’s Association will offer a one-hour session from 1-2 p.m. on July 17 in the lower level classroom of the Betty Ehart Senior Center. The session will focus on the early stages of Alzheimer’s to include symptoms, coping strategies for caregivers and resources to help families who are challenged with dementia. For more information, contact David Davis 505-473-1297 or dldavis@alz.org.

    Nature Playtimes, Sponsored by Blue Cross Blue Shield of NM at 10 a.m. at the Nature Center.
Join local families for fun, hands-on activities, hikes, games, and stories in nature. Free. More information at peecnature.org.
    TUESDAY

  • Pet Talk: Protecting your pet from the summer heat

    Summer time in Texas means more time to play outside, go swimming, and soak up the sun. However, warmer temperatures also mean that pets may be more susceptible to heat exhaustion or heat stroke. To help pet owners avoid these risks, Dr. Stacy Eckman, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, offered some insight.
    “Heat stroke and heat exhaustion are major problems for pets in the summer, especially in short nosed breeds, such a pug or a bulldog,” Eckman said.  “These conditions can occur during hot and humid days and even cooler days, if your pets aren’t accustomed to the heat.”

    Heat exhaustion is the early stages of a heat stroke and causes lethargy, vomiting, and weakness. Following continued exercise or exposure to heat, Eckman said a heat stroke can occur with more severe signs, including extreme lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and pale mucous membranes.  This can lead significant problems up to and including death if not recognized and treated immediately.

  • LAHS coaches, players to lead tennis clinic

    Registration is now open for the Los Alamos Tennis Clinic, which will be Aug. 7-11.

    The clinic is open to kids between the ages of 4 and 15.

    It will take place on the Mesa Tennis Courts, located behind Sullivan Field.

    Los Alamos High School boy’s tennis coach Lloyd Wilton has been running clinics like this one for the past three years, and has seen good participation each time.

    Two years ago, there were about 80 participants, while around 70 kids took part last year.

    Wilton said he expects similar participation this year.

    Another clinic was in June, with around 40 kids participating. Wilton expects around 40 new kids to take part in the August camp.

    LAHS coaches and members of the LAHS tennis teams lead the instruction.

    In fact, assisting with these clinics is required for all members of the tennis teams, according to Wilton.

    “It’s a really great opportunity for the kids to teach what they learn in their own practices, and it’s great for us coaches to see what still needs to get worked on,” he said.

    Kids between the ages of  4 and 8 will be on the tennis courts from 4:30-5:30 p.m. each day, while kids between the ages of 9-15 are on the courts from 5:45-6:45 p.m.

  • Los Alamos County fire to end Stage 1 fire restrictions today

    Los Alamos County Fire Department will lift Stage 1 fire restrictions at noon today.

    Recent rain and milder temperatures have produced a decrease in the fire danger for Los Alamos County.

    The stricter fire restrictions were based on dry conditions and higher-than-normal temperatures. Several criteria are utilized to determine when to impose or lift fire restrictions, which include current and predicted weather, fuel moisture, fire activity levels and available firefighting resources.

    The arrival of monsoonal moisture has eased the dry conditions that led to restrictions and decreased fire danger to moderate, according to the county.

    “LAFD thanks all of our residents and visitors who adhered to the Stage 1 restrictions to help us reduce the fire danger during the recent high fire danger conditions,” said Jeff Wetteland, LAFD fire marshal. “Even though the Stage 1 restrictions are being rescinded, we encourage everyone to remain vigilant and continue to use caution with campfires or activities that can result in a wildland fire.”

    Campfires will be allowed on private property and at the Camp May camping areas in an approved fire ring/burn container with the surrounding areas free of vegetation. However, a water supply must be available, preferably a garden hose or buckets of water.