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Today's News

  • Melissa Savage to speak at library

    Melissa Savage, the author of “Rio: a Photographic Journey down the Old Rio Grande,” will speak at 7 p.m. at Mesa Public Library Thursday.
    Savage is a conservationist, geographer, professor emerita with UCLA, and director of the Four Corners Institute in Santa Fe. Her book is comprised of historical photographs of the Rio Grande, which are accompanied by essays written by people who are closely associated with the history of the river.
    UNM Press describes the book as: “The dynamic Río Grande has run through all the valley’s diverse cultures: Puebloan, Spanish, Mexican and Anglo. Photography arrived in the region at the beginning of the river’s great transformation by trade, industry and cultivation. In RIO, Melissa Savage has collected images that document the sweeping history of that transformation – from those of 19th-century expeditionary photographer W. H. Jackson to the work of the great 20th-century chronicler of the river, Laura Gilpin.”
    The Authors Speak program at Mesa Public Library provides a unique opportunity to meet prominent authors from the region. The readings and conversations take place on the fourth Thursday of each month, upstairs at Mesa Public Library. The Authors sell and sign books after the talks.

  • Hilltopper girls win big at Rust Buster meet

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper girls track and field team had a big performance last weekend at the Rio Rancho Rust Buster.
    In all, nine teams, most of them Class 6A schools from the Albuquerque area took part in the Rust Buster – for many of the teams involved, it was the first meet of the season – but the Hilltopper girls earned a comfortable victory. The Hilltoppers finished with 133.6 points Saturday at Rio Rancho High School.
    Los Alamos finished comfortably ahead of the host Rio Rancho Rams to win the girls team title. The Rams picked up 109.6 points. None of the other seven teams competing in the meet factored into the decision.
    The Hilltopper boys track team also took part last Saturday, picking up third place in the nine-team meet. The Hilltopper boys earned 60.5 points, while the host Rams held off Eldorado to win the team competition.
    In the girls competition, Los Alamos picked up some big performances in the relay events to help it win that team title. Los Alamos also had a very good showing in the field events.
    The Hilltoppers won the 400-meter and 1600-meter relays, and finished second in the other two relays on the day. They had dominant performances, winning the 400 relay by nearly a second-and-a-half, while the 1600 relay team won by more than 7 seconds over runner-up Cibola in that event.

  • ’Topper softball, baseball pick up big wins

    Los Alamos’ softball team used the long ball to its full advantage Tuesday afternoon in a road victory over the Pojoaque Valley Elkettes.
    The Hilltoppers blasted three home runs in the game, the big blow a three-run shot to straightaway center field by Alicia Gonzales.
    Gonzales’ fifth-inning blast broke open a tight ballgame, putting the Hilltoppers up 7-3 at the time. Relief pitcher Reyna Lucero closed out the game after the Hilltoppers came up with two more runs to win it 9-3 at Chris Peterson Memorial Field.
    Los Alamos is off to a hot start this season, particularly at the plate, ahead of a big road doubleheader today against Class 5A Belen. Los Alamos’ offense has produced 58 runs in six games this season.
    Pojoaque Valley’s Elkettes (0-4) actually drew first blood in the game, scoring twice in the bottom of the first, but Los Alamos answered right back with a pair of runs in the top of the second. Los Alamos took the lead for good with another pair of runs in the third, those coming on its first homer of the game, that provided by Megan Romero.
    Claire Bluhm also hit a solo home run late in the game for Los Alamos (5-1) on Tuesday.

  • The public needs to keep the press honest

    BY GREG WHITE
    Los Alamos Resident, Guest Editorial

  • Trading guns across the border

    BY BOB HAGAN
    Coffee on a Cold Morning

  • An interview with Ruth Tatter, co-founder of Los Alamos Museum of Art

    By Mandy Marksteiner

    Marksteiner:  How did you first come up with the idea for LAMOA?

    Tatter: My mother was living in a condo in Los Alamos and one of her neighbors was a gentleman who had an incredible art collection. He had been collecting for a long time and was looking for a place to put it.

    Los Alamos needs to have this place where these collections can go. There’s a scientific history here that has been well documented, but there's a cultural history that goes along with this of art and artists who've been here from the beginning.                                                                                                              

  • Scientists race to prevent wipeout of world's coral reefs

    SOUTH ARI ATOLL, Maldives (AP) — There were startling colors here just a year ago, a dazzling array of life beneath the waves. Now this Maldivian reef is dead, killed by the stress of rising ocean temperatures. What's left is a haunting expanse of gray, a scene repeated in reefs across the globe in what has fast become a full-blown ecological catastrophe.

    The world has lost roughly half its coral reefs in the last 30 years. Scientists are now scrambling to ensure that at least a fraction of these unique ecosystems survives beyond the next three decades. The health of the planet depends on it: Coral reefs support a quarter of all marine species, as well as half a billion people around the world.

    "This isn't something that's going to happen 100 years from now. We're losing them right now," said marine biologist Julia Baum of Canada's University of Victoria. "We're losing them really quickly, much more quickly than I think any of us ever could have imagined."

    Even if the world could halt global warming now, scientists still expect that more than 90 percent of corals will die by 2050. Without drastic intervention, we risk losing them all.

  • Panel delays vote on early childhood ed initiative

    By Andrew Oxford

    The New Mexican

     

    Most members of the Senate Rules Committee trickled out of a hearing Monday, scuttling a vote on a proposed constitutional amendment to expand funding for early childhood education.

    The lack of a quorum stalled House Joint Resolution 1 in the first of two committees it must clear before even reaching a vote of the full Senate before the legislative session ends at noon Saturday.

    A couple Republicans were in the room when the Rules Committee took up the proposal. But all four Republicans on the committee either left the hearing or never entered it. Two Democrats also were absent, so only five of the committee's 11 members remained as the debate wound to a close. A majority of a committee's members must be present for it to act on legislation.

    Without a quorum, the Rules Committee chairwoman, Sen. Linda Lopez, D-Albuquerque, adjourned the committee altogether.

    "We're at a standstill," she told the remaining members, all Democrats.

    One cosponsor accused the resolution's critics of leaving to avoid a vote rather than go on the record opposing the proposal.

    "They know a vote against this is a bad vote," said Rep. Javier Martinez, D-Albuquerque.

  • Reading bill dies quietly

    By Robert Nott
    The New Mexican

    For seven consecutive years, Gov. Susana Martinez has unsuccessfully pushed a bill to hold back thousands of third-graders who score below par on standardized reading tests.

    A pair of similar bills this year haven't even received a hearing before a legislative committee. And with just five days left in the 60-day legislative session, it is unlikely that they will.

    Democratic Rep. Stephanie Garcia Richard, chairwoman of the House Education Committee, said she didn't know whether the panel would have time to hear House Bill 114, introduced by Rep. Monica Youngblood, R-Albuquerque. But even if Garcia Richard's committee takes up the measure, it almost certainly would table it.

    "I am never going to support mandatory retention," said Garcia Richard, herself a teacher. "But I do support the intervention portions of that bill" to provide extra help to children who don't read well.

    Despite the fact that her committee is "all caught up" on legislative bills, Garcia Richard said, she wasn't sure where Youngblood's bill stood in terms of a hearing date.

  • Painter Ming Franz to teach two-day splash watercolor workshop this weekend

    Join Ming Franz, an International Artist Magazine's recent grand prize winner, will teach a splash color workshop at the Fuller Lodge Art Center this weekend.

    The class will be from 9:30 a.m.-4:40 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

    Beginning with ancient black-and-white splash, the class will evolve into marbling splash and then abstract splash using liquid watercolor, acrylic, and Asian ink.

    The foundation of this painting process is based on principles originating in Tang Dynasty China with a technique, known as PoMo. Essentially the artist freely "splashes" liquid color onto stacks of dampened sheets of mulberry paper. After the sheets dry, they are separated and the real magic begins.