.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • DPU offers to relocate water meters

    The Los Alamos Board of Public Utilities voted in May to offer to move water meters located near customer’s houses to the property line at no cost to the customer.
    Vice Chair David Powell introduced that motion in response to a report by a subcommittee charged with investigating an issue raised by resident George Chandler, who received a bill for $5,839.99 for repairing an aging water delivery line on his property.
    Chandler asked the board to change DPU rules and regulations to say that DPU owns and maintains the delivery line from the main to the water meter, and the owner owns and maintains the service line from the meter to the residence or commercial property.
    The subcommittee investigated DPU policies and found that Rule W-2, Water Service Connection, DPU Rules and Regulations, dated May 5, 2006, states that when the water meter is installed in close proximity to the residence or establishment, the cost of operation and maintenance of that portion of the delivery line that extends across the property from the water main to the water meter is the responsibility of the property owner, as is the service line. The water meter is the responsibility of DPU.
    Stating that this was common practice in New Mexico and the United States, the subcommittee recommended no change to the rule.

  • Public meeting to address New Mexico's wild animal policy

    SANTA FE (AP) — Wildlife advocates and New Mexico lawmakers are planning to discuss outdoor safety and a state law that led to the death of a mother black bear in June following an attack on a marathon runner in the Valles Caldera National Preserve.

    The meeting is scheduled for Tuesday evening in Santa Fe.

    Participants will include several environmental groups, the New Mexico Game and Fish Department and Karen Williams, the marathon runner who was attacked June 18 in the Valles Caldera.

    The black bear was killed the next day for rabies testing.

    Williams wants to change state regulations that mandate the euthanization of any wild animal that attacks a human for rabies testing.

    Williams argues that the bear, which was acting in defense of its cubs, showed no signs of rabies.

  • County attorney Ehler to retire

    After just four years with Los Alamos County, County Attorney Rebecca Ehler retires at the end of this week.
    Before coming to Los Alamos, Ehler served as Alamogordo city attorney from 1993-2002, before transitioning to legal advisor for the Alamogordo’s Department of Public Safety in order to spend more time with her family.
    Prior to that, Ehler was the first county attorney hired by New Mexico’s Chaves County, serving for nearly five years as legal advisor and for a time as acting planning and zoning administrator. During that time she won a decision against the New Mexico Department of Taxation and Revenue in the New Mexico Supreme Court on behalf of several counties.
    When asked how Los Alamos compared to her previous positions, Ehler replied, “Harder, because they have the resources to delve more deeply into issues then some other localities. So that’s good, because you can feel more confident in the responses you give and it’s bad, because sometimes it can slow things down, and it’s just overall more intense.”

  • Presbyterian pulling out of New Mexico health exchange

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Officials with Presbyterian Health Plan say the insurance company will no longer offer individual and family plans on the Affordable Care Act marketplace in New Mexico starting next year.

    The Albuquerque Journal reported Monday that Presbyterian has sent letters to members notifying them of the changes.

    The decision to stop offering coverage will affect 10,000 exchange members, 80 percent of whom now receive federal subsidies.

    Presbyterian officials say patients who purchased on the exchange used medical services 30 percent more than other patient groups off the exchange.

    In January, Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Mexico stopped offering individual insurance plans through the state health exchange.

    Company officials say it lost $19.2 million in 2015 on the 35,000 individuals covered by plans they purchased on and off the exchange.

  • Anonymous tips help solve criminal incidents

    Tips reported to the Los Alamos County Crime Stoppers are proving to be effective.
    The Los Alamos Police Department has successfully solved multiple criminal incidents that were reported to the department’s Criminal Investigations Section. LAPD is hoping to continue the success of community members reporting on criminal activity.
    “LAPD would like to thank the local media and the public for their assistance related to these incidents,” LAPD Commander Oliver Morris said. “These tips show that the citizens, job-holders, and visitors in our area wish to assist the Los Alamos Police Department in our mission to provide quality pro-active law enforcement services to help keep our community safe and hold those accountable who choose to commit crime in our area.”
    Among the type of cases that were solved this year due to anonymous crime tips are shoplifting and unlawful taking of a motor vehicle.
    Twenty-three year-old Raymond Green of Española, 38-year-old Concha Herrera of Truchas and 49-year-old Elias Gallegos of Española were charged or had warrants due to shoplifting cases. Crystal Padilla, 33, of Santa Fe, and 39-year-old Antonio Lopez, of Santa Fe, were charged or had warrants issued due to unlawful taking of motor vehicle cases.

  • County attorney Ehler to retire

    After just four years with Los Alamos County, County Attorney Rebecca Ehler retires at the end of this week.
    Before coming to Los Alamos, Ehler served as Alamogordo city attorney from 1993-2002, before transitioning to legal advisor for the Alamogordo’s Department of Public Safety in order to spend more time with her family.
    Prior to that, Ehler was the first county attorney hired by New Mexico’s Chaves County, serving for nearly five years as legal advisor and for a time as acting planning and zoning administrator. During that time she won a decision against the New Mexico Department of Taxation and Revenue in the New Mexico Supreme Court on behalf of several counties.
    When asked how Los Alamos compared to her previous positions, Ehler replied, “Harder, because they have the resources to delve more deeply into issues then some other localities. So that’s good, because you can feel more confident in the responses you give and it’s bad, because sometimes it can slow things down, and it’s just overall more intense.”

  • Focus legislation on one issue at a time

    The U. S. Senate, as you probably know, left Washington for a lengthy summer recess without passing an appropriation for research on the Zika virus. Though most senators agreed on the funding, Democrats disagreed with provisions unrelated to this issue, which had been included in the bill by Republicans.
    Among those provisions were restrictions on funding for birth control services from Planned Parenthood, weakened clean water laws governing pesticides and, as if the nation needs something else to motivate people to shoot each other, a provision that would have allowed the Confederate flag to be displayed at military cemeteries.
    Let us not, for this moment, debate the Planned Parenthood issue, the pesticide issue or even the Confederate flag issue. Let’s talk about process.
    This process, sometimes called logrolling, is what happens when legislation is written so that in order to vote for one thing that a legislator is in favor of, the legislator has to vote for something he or she opposes.
    In this case, according to the news reports, U. S. senators on both sides are now waiting for a few American babies to be born with tragic deformities so they can point fingers at each other. At least New Mexico, with its low humidity, is not a heavy mosquito state.  

  • Passport to Pajarito program going strong

    The Pajarito Environmental Education Center’s Passport to the Pajarito Plateau program has had a tremendous start this summer, with some 2,000 hikes reporters in the first few months.
    This popular program is a way to get families outside, exploring the trails together, according to PEEC’s spokeswoman Sandra West.
    The program is a partnership between PEEC, Los Alamos County, Bandelier, and the Valles Caldera with generous support from the Delle Foundation.
    Hikers that use the program enjoy the trails in the passport, which are also included in PEEC’s free Los Alamos Trails app for iOS and Android operating systems, and look for a wooden post with a specially designed rubbing plate.
    Each trail has its own custom-designed plate, with artwork by Heather Ward. When the hikers find the post, they make a crayon rubbing of the plate to “stamp” their passports.  After two, five, eight, 12 and 16 hikes, they bring their passports to the PEEC Nature Center to record the hikes on the giant bar graph and receive their prizes.
    Children are especially fond of the whistle/compass combination that they receive for two hikes, and adults love the bandana printed with all the Los Alamos trails that is the prize for 8 hikes, West said in a release about the program.

  • Faith & Science forum today

    The Los Alamos Faith & Science Forum concludes its summer series on the topic “What Makes Us Human?”at 6 p.m. today at Kelly Hall at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church.
    Dinner will be at 6 p.m., with a presentation at 6:30 p.m. and discussion at 7 p.m. Talks are aimed at a general audience. All are welcome. Follow our blog at lafsf.org.
    Today’s topic is “The Whole Person.” Scientists, philosophers and theologians have developed models of humankind that vary from a whole person to dualism to tricotomies. Gerry Wood came to Los Alamos after completing a Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry at the University of Texas at Austin. In 2004 he retired after 35 years at LANL, working mostly in health and safety areas. For more information see GerryOWood.com.

  • Community Calendar 7-27-16

    TODAY
    Chamber Business After Hours from 5:30-7 p.m. at projectY cowork Los Alamos. RSVP Requested: losalamoschamber.chambermaster.com.

    Summer Family Evenings: Wildland Fire Fighters at 6:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. See inside a fire fighter’s truck! Del Norte Credit Union sponsors this evening of family fun.  Cost is $5 for non-member families and free for PEEC member families.

    The United Thrift Shop at 2545 Canyon Road is having a half price sale on everything but jewelry today.
    THURSDAY
    Nature Yoga at 6:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. Practice yoga at the nature center with Christa Tyson, where you have a great view of nature. Cost is $15 for non-members and $12 for PEEC members. 

    NM FAST SBIR/STTR Proposal Workshop Webinar (USDA Focus) from 1-3 p.m. at projectY cowork Los Alamos.
    FRIDAY
    Gentle Walks from 8:30 a.m.- noon at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free.

    Young at Heart Hike at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. Join us on a hike that brings together people of all ages to connect, learn, play, and explore. Free.