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Today's News

  • Garcia Holmes, Morales enter races for lieutenant governor

    SANTA FE (AP) — Two more candidates have jumped into the race for New Mexico lieutenant governor.

    State Sen. Howie Morales is running for the Democratic nomination in a crowded primary race. Michele Garcia Holmes will seek the Republican nomination, with no other current contenders.

    A former teacher, Morales of Silver City has served in the state Senate since 2008 and ran unsuccessfully for governor in 2014. Garcia Holmes is a former police officer and former chief of staff to the New Mexico Attorney General's Office.

    The Santa Fe New Mexican reports that other Democrats in the race are Eagles Nest resident Jeff Carr, Dona Ana County Commissioner Billy Garrett, former House Majority Leader Rick Miera, and David McTeigue, a juvenile probation officer from Rio Rancho.

  • New Mexico Legislature under scrutiny for self-enrichment

    SANTA FE (AP) — Limited safeguards against self-enrichment in the nation's only unsalaried legislature are under scrutiny in the wake of a corruption trial and felony convictions against a former New Mexico state senator.

    Former Sen. Phil Griego is awaiting sentencing after a jury found him guilty of fraud, felony ethical violations and other charges.

    The case is a central exhibit in the campaign for a 2018 ballot initiative. New Mexico voters will consider whether to create an independent ethics commission that could shift the review of complaints against lawmakers from closed-door committees to a more public forum.

    Some lawmakers say the unsalaried status of lawmakers has turned into a liability that is exploited by high-paid lobbyists. Others say citizen legislators bring needed expertise to policy debates.
     

  • LAPS board member Ben-Naim honored for training

    Ellen Ben-Naim, a school board member with the Los Alamos Public Schools, received an “exemplary” award from her fellow school board members statewide during a recent annual conference of the New Mexico School Boards Association.

    Ben-Naim, who represents District 1 in Los Alamos on the board, was recognized for earning 20 or more hours of training in leadership.

    She was elected to the local board in March.

    The school board officials from across the state participated in the annual meeting, which occurred in Albuquerque on Friday and Saturday.

  • Mysterious structures in SF National Forest pose major fire danger

    Human-built cone stick structures, some two-stories tall, are popping up throughout the Santa Fe National Forest, causing a mystery for Forest Service officials.

    A volunteer showed Española Ranger District employees this seven or eight stick structures off Tesuque Peak Road at Aspen Vista.  And at least 10 more have been reported below the Aspen Vista picnic area. The mysterious structures have also  been spotted on the Winsor Trail and in the Big Tesuque drainage, officials reported Friday.

    Officials are concerned about the significant health and safety hazards posed by these structures.

    Santa Fe National Forest staff said the structures are elaborately constructed out of 1,000 or more individual sticks or logs.

    The wood is seasoned and dry, and the design is similar to a classic kindling pyramid but on a much larger scale, according to Forest Service officials.  And to worsen the fire danger, people appear to be using fire rings inside many of the structures.

  • Atomic City Update: Ice rink provides unique experience for all hockey fans

    After going to a large number of sporting events since coming to Los Alamos, the prize for best atmosphere and experience so far has to go to the one I had at the home opener for the Los Alamos High School ice hockey team last weekend against Taos.

    The venue may be smaller than any other event I have been to, but the sense of community felt among the hockey fans in attendance was unmatched. A big part of it has to do with the small venue, and how close everyone is to the action.

    There are very few places to sit at the rink. The vast majority of people stand around the ice and watch right through the glass. Everyone has the opportunity to have a big collision occur right where they are standing, and there is not a bad place to watch the action.

    As the players step onto the ice, they high-fived a group of children stationed right outside the entrance gate, and the smiles on the kid’s faces was a joy to see.

    Because of the small area, there is no sense of separation that exists in other sports. The players are free to interact with spectators before taking the ice, and even in between periods.

    It really helps to make everyone feel like they are a part of the action.

    Overall, the experience felt more like a family get-together, as opposed to a normal sporting event.

  • LAHS girls basketball struggles at early season tournament

    The first two games of the Joe Armijo Classic in Albuquerque didn’t go the way the Los Alamos High School girls basketball team envisioned, continuing a rough start to the year.

    The Hilltoppers dropped games Thursday and Friday against Las Cruces High School and Cleveland High School, both by large margins.

    Thursday’s game saw LAHS match up against Las Cruces, the top ranked team in Class 6A.

    Almost immediately, the game got out of hand. In the first quarter, Las Cruces jumped out to a 22-4 lead, as sophomore Becca Green was the only Hilltopper able to get into the scoring column.

    Las Cruces used the full-court press against the Hilltoppers to perfection, forcing turnovers and limiting offensive opportunities. That, combined with the team’s prowess on the offensive end of the floor, made things impossible for LAHS.

    At halftime, the Hilltoppers trailed 45-12.

    As the time clock ticked down in the second half, the deficit for LAHS widened as offense continued to be hard to come by.

    After three quarters, Las Cruces led 64-17, and the entire fourth quarter was played with a running clock, which allowed the entire quarter to be played in less than 10 minutes.

    As time expired, Las Cruces walked away with a 70-26 win.

  • LAMS Native Hawks celebrate Feast Day at UNM-LA

    Last week, the Los Alamos Middle School Native Hawks celebrated a Feast Day, as Native American Heritage month came to an end.

    Throughout the month, students attended a special gathering at the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos, to spend time with Native poets and potters. The artisans shared their talents and backgrounds inspiring young students for the future.

    The Native Hawks “Rocked their Mocs,” and spent the early portion of the month fundraising for a school project.

    Students sold turquoise ribbons and scented pencils to raise $200 to share their culture with their fellow hawks. Several local residents were inspired by their efforts and made  donations to support their work.

    The fundraising was not to benefit their club directly, but to create awareness of local cultures for their fellow students.

    A Feast Day would give a real world learning opportunity to all hawks as they came together to sample cuisine.

    The Native Hawks raised the funds to hire Chef Norma Naranjo to bake Native American items to share. Narano of, The Feasting Place, baked Indian cookies, Horno Bread and Pies that arrived fresh in the morning, straight from the Okay Owingeh, also called the San Juan Pueblo. Her husband Hutch and master of the horno, is from the Santa Clara Puebo.

  • PEEC announces special holiday hours

    The Los Alamos Nature Center will be closed Dec. 24, Dec. 25 and Jan. 1 and open all other days in December and January.

    The nature center is free, and offers a great place to bring family to orient to the Pajarito Plateau before venturing outside or to the neighboring national parks and preserve.

    People of all ages enjoy exploring the nature center’s interactive exhibits, watching the local wildlife, discovering more about the geology of our area, and exploring the unique collection of nature-inspired items in their gift shop.

    The Los Alamos Nature Center, located at 2600 Canyon Road, is open from 10 AM to 4 PM on

    Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays as well as 1-4 p.m. on Sundays. The nature center is open late on Tuesdays, until 8 p.m., closed Thursdays for regular maintenance.

  • Young hockey team primed for success

    Prior to this season, Los Alamos High School hockey coach Kevin Brake believed this season could be a bit of a rebuilding year. The team graduated a large number of seniors after last season, and was relying on a new group of players to step in and fill big roles.

    After playing three games this season, Brake no longer believes his team is going through a rebuilding year. With a perfect 3-0 start, and 25 goals scored so far, his sights are set as high as ever. 

    “What I like is that we are getting effort from across the board, we are getting contributions across the board,” Brake said.

    One of the things that encourages him the most about this team is that the scoring has come from all over the roster, not just one of his forward lines. In fact, the scoring has been incredibly balanced. Four players lead the team with four goals scored, Benjamin Rees, John Charles, Ray Guffee and Sean Mitchell.

    Brake has no doubt his team has enough talent to compete with any team on its schedule. The question he has is whether the team will show enough composure and maturity to stay in games when things don’t look good.

    “If they are willing to outwork the other team, we can be very, very good,” Brake said.

  • Why must Los Alamos be divided?

    BY LISA SHIN AND KATHLEENE PARKER
    Guests Editorial

    Our nation is divided. Must Los Alamos be too? Why, so often, are letters or comments at public meetings about personal attack? Perhaps we should remember Thomas Jefferson’s, “Every difference of opinion is not a difference of principle.”

    In the Dec. 1 edition of the Los Alamos Monitor, Jess Cullinan – incidentally, a prime driver in asking the school board to pass a sanctuary policy – wrote labeling “those vocal few” as seeking to “sow chaos and to sabotage” the school board’s and superintendent’s efforts to protect vulnerable students.

    But, it is that assumption – that students are even vulnerable – that is our right to question. Cullinan’s letter defines that federal immigration policy “prohibits by law” asking about immigration status and that ICE activity in schools is restricted, proof – based on Cullinan’s own information – that the Los Alamos effort is not about solving a real problem but make a political statement.