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Today's News

  • Reluctant lawmakers set sights on fix for N.M. budget

    SANTA FE (AP) — New Mexico lawmakers are reluctantly returning to the budget negotiation table with Republican Gov. Susana Martinez as time runs short to restore billions of dollars in vetoed spending for the fiscal year beginning July 1.
    The state Supreme Court on Thursday refused a request by lawmakers to rescind the governor’s vetoes of all funding for the legislative branch and state institutions of higher education.
    A special legislative session is set for May 24. Elected officials will have to shore up anemic tax revenues or agree to a new round of spending cuts at state agencies or public schools.
    Here’s a glimpse of what lies ahead:
    Tax Shortfall
    Lawmakers and the governor largely agree on a $6.1 billion state budget that would slightly increase spending, particularly for public schools and cash-strapped courts. They remain at odds over how to fill a roughly $150 million shortfall in revenues.
    Lawmakers in March approved higher registration fees for interstate trucking and increased taxes for some hospitals, online sales and retail gasoline and diesel sales. Martinez vetoed the tax hikes and lambasted lawmakers.

  • Cyberattack wave ebbs, but experts see risk of more

    LONDON (AP) — The "ransomware" cyberattack that has hit companies and governments around the world ebbed in intensity on Monday, though experts warned that new versions of the virus could emerge.
    Thousands more infections were reported Monday, largely in Asia, which had been closed for business when the malware first struck Friday. The cases were more contained, however, than the systemic outbreak that last week paralyzed computers running factories, banks, government agencies and transport systems around the world.
    Many of the 200,000 victims in more than 150 countries were still struggling to recover from the first attack of the so-called "WannaCry" virus.
    Carmaker Renault said one of its French plants, which employs 3,500 people, wasn't reopening Monday as a "preventative step."
    Britain's National Health Service said about a fifth of NHS trusts — the regional bodies that run hospitals and clinics — were hit by the attack on Friday, leading to thousands of canceled appointments and operations. Seven of the 47 affected trusts were still having IT problems Monday.

  • Nerses ‘Krik’ Krikorian reflects on his career as a scientist and intelligence analyst

    BY LAURA MULLANE
    LANL Communications Staff

    When Nerses “Krik” Krik Krikorian was born on a Turkish roadside in 1921, the future looked bleak. His parents were fleeing the Armenian genocide that would ultimately claim 1.5 million lives. They spent the next four years moving from country to country with nothing but the clothes on their backs, trying to find a permanent home.

    Along the way, in Aleppo, Syria, his mom gave birth to his brother. “It’s a tortured way of living because you don’t belong anywhere,” recalled Krikorian. They finally found refuge in Canada. When Krikorian was 4 years old, they moved to the United States, settling in Niagara Falls, where his father became a factory worker and his mom a homemaker, and where his youngest brother was born. 

    Today, at age 96, Krikorian lives in a brightly lit condominium in Los Alamos, surrounded by his vast art collection and family photos, marveling at his good fortune. When he started kindergarten in Niagara Falls, he barely spoke English. Sixteen years later, he graduated from college with a bachelor’s degree in chemistry and began a job at Union Carbide, working in a lab that made highly enriched uranium. For what purpose, Krikorian wasn’t sure.

  • Today in history 5-12-17
  • Today in history 5-11-17
  • Supreme Court denies challenge to overturn governor's vetoes

    SANTA FE (AP) — The New Mexico Supreme Court on Thursday rejected a request to override budget vetoes, leaving negotiations about how to solve the state's budget crisis — and restore funding to the Legislature — in the hands of the governor and lawmakers.
    In a two-page order, the court said it was too soon to consider any possible constitutional violations related to Gov. Susana Martinez's vetoes of all funding for the Legislature and state universities in the coming fiscal year.
    The Republican governor has called a special session for May 24 in an attempt to resolve a state budget crisis linked to faltering tax revenues and a weak local economy.
    The Democratic-led Legislature had argued that Martinez overstepped her authority by defunding the legislative branch of government and all state institutions of higher education.
    Martinez had urged the state Supreme Court to stay out of budget negotiations and said her vetoes were made in pursuit of reductions to state spending and never sought to abolish the Legislature.
    For the upcoming special session, Martinez has outlined rough proposals to restore most vetoed funding for the fiscal year starting July 1, but there has been no sign of a compromise with Democratic lawmakers.

  • Local expert to lead wildflower walk

    Pajarito Environmental Education Center’s Jemez Mountain Herbarium curator Chick Keller will lead a Wildflower Walk starting at 5:30 p.m. May 22.
    These popular monthly outings are easy walks to identify some of the wildflowers in and around Los Alamos.
    Each month, Keller will pick a different trail, depending on what is blooming at the time. The walks are free and there is no advance registration required.
    The Wildflower Walks will take place one Monday a month for the season. Instead of having a walk in June, there will be two walks in July: July 3 and 24. Participants will receive a plant list and that, along with instruction from Keller, will help them learn how to identify wildflowers currently blooming in Los Alamos.
    The group meets at 5:30 p.m. at the Los Alamos Nature Center, located at 2600 Canyon Road, to carpool to the trailhead.
    For more information about this and other PEEC programs, visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org or call 662-0460.

  • Assets in Action: A good week to give thanks

    Sometimes you just need to celebrate and this is certainly the month to do it.
    This week is teacher appreciation week! Yes they give us a whole week to pick a day to let our teachers know we care about them. You don’t have to do something spectacular to acknowledge the day in and day out devotion they have for our children.
    If you need an idea or two, drop an email and say thanks, have a bit more time, hand write a short note to say thank you. Pick flowers from your own garden or do it in baking or crafting or a special candy from the store. The truth is most people just want to know that you notice.
    One of my favorite elementary years for our oldest was allowing him to pick out a candy for the teacher. He picked a pretty big one and I was certain her own children would be thankful too.
    Did you also know it is National Nurse’s week?
    There are school nurses and hospital nurses and you may know one or two that you salute on your own. My personal favorites are Megan Pfeffer, Valencia Jenkins, Kathy Semelsberger, Mrs. Ballew and Peggy Ickes. There are many, many more and I hope you have one or two in your life.

  • Community Calendar 5-10-17

    FRIDAY
    Gentle Walks
at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free.

    The Bear Buffet at 6 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Come “Eat like a Bear” during bear month! Join in a discussion about rescued bear cubs with Dr. Kathleen Ramsay and partake of a representation of the many delicacies of a bear diet. Cost is $30 for non-members, $24 for PEEC members.
    SATURDAY
    “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead” plays at 7:30 p.m. at the Los Alamos Little Theatre, 1670 Nectar St. Tickets are $14. Cost is $12 for students and seniors.

    Bear Festival from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Bring your friends and family to discover more about the amazing creatures with which we share our home! Free.

    Feature Film: Mysteries of the Unseen World
at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. Discover what is normally too fast, too slow, too small, or outside the visible spectrum. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.

    “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead” plays at 7:30 p.m. at the Los Alamos Little Theatre, 1670 Nectar St. Tickets are $14. Cost is $12 for students and seniors.

     

  • Lunch with Leader set for May 16

    League of Women Voters’ community event, Lunch with a Leader, will present information about the Recreation Bond at 11:45 a.m. May 16 at the Mesa Public Library.
    Darren Meadows, Philo Shelton, James Chrobocinski, Susan O’Leary, Lisa Shin, James Whitehead and Lisa Brenner will explain both sides of the bond and answer questions.
    Both sides will present for 15 minutes and then the group will open up for questions.
    The Recreation Bond is currently up for a vote with a mail-in ballot that is already in county homes. The mail-in ballots must be received at the County Clerk’s office by mail or in person by May 23.
    Speaking as proponents of the bond are County Councilors O’Leary and Chrobocinski, Los Alamos County Public Works Director Shelton, and Meadows, a professional engineer consulting for Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Presenting opposing views are Shin, an optometrist in town, Brenner, the Creative Director of EDJ Werks, and Whitehead. These three local citizens started A Better Way for LA PAC.
    More information about the projects, the projected cost, and the operations and maintenance cost is available at losalamosbondprojects2017.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Planned-Project-Overview.pdf.