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Today's News

  • Duane Smith Auditorium set to open in February

    “We’re hoping to get in there the week of Feb. 12,” School Bond and Construction Coordinator Herb McLean said. The building was supposed to open in mid January, but many of the workers assigned to the project were diverted to other assignments, and to assist when the country was hit with three hurricanes earlier this year. 

    They also had some trouble getting hold of a specific type of steel to complete the project.

    “There was a lot of construction going on before we started, and getting contractors in has been really hard,” McLean said. “Second, a lot of workers went to work in the hurricane zones.”

    The steel, McLean said, should be in this week.

    In 2016, the Los Alamos School Board approved a new design for the theater that adds an additional 3,600 square feet onto the front of the building. The additional space will include rooms for concessions, a box office and a space for storage and merchandising. 

  • Registration begins for UNM-LA

    With a high number of faculty who have Ph.Ds in their teaching fields, UNM-LA provides an exceptional quality of instruction. 

    Small class sizes allow for personal attention that is critical for student learning and success. The student support in advising and career exploration is vibrant and personal. According to Kathryn Vigil, Student Enrollment Director at UNM Los Alamos, “There is no better value in New Mexico, and families can feel comfortable knowing that they’ve made a good investment. Compared to the two larger Universities in New Mexico, the savings at UNM-LA can be viewed as a 45 percent discount. Money can also be saved in rent, food and transportation for students who choose to live at home for a year or two.”

    In addition to traditional face to face classes, UNM-LA offers online and hybrid classes (a combination of face-to- face and online) to help meet the various scheduling preferences and learning styles of students. There are also a variety of short courses, including classes that will start later in the semester.  

  • Calendar

    Today through April 4
    – Forest Explorers Hike and Play from 1-3 p.m. at the Nature Center. Get outside this winter by exploring with PEEC! This six-session class is for youth ages 5 to 8 and meets every other Wednesday. Admission: $135/non-member, $110/PEEC member. 

    THURSDAY

    Dr. Carmen Solano will be doing a Free Thyroid Seminar from 6-7 p.m. at the Los Alamos Project Y Conference room, from 6 Solano is a Medical Physician and a Functional Medicine Doctor. Space is limited so call 505-500-8356 to reserve a chair.

     

    Raspberry PI Club 7-8 p.m. at Los Alamos Makers, 3540 Orange St., Suite LV1. All levels are welcome. Get introduced to Raspberry Pis, get help with your Pi project and meet other Pi enthusiasts. Club facilitated by Akkana Peck, author of “Jumpstarting the Raspberry Pi zero W; Controlling the world around you with a $10 computer.”

    FRIDAY

    High altitude baking presentation from 10-11 a.m. in the Fuller Lodge classroom, on the second floor. Free. Contact Desaree Jimenez from New Mexico State University at 662-2656 for information.

     

  • Laundry pods are a reminder to talk to our kids

     This week, I would like to focus on how often we talk to our children and maybe provide some ideas of what we need to talk about.

    I confess, I was unaware of the laundry detergent pod challenge. I thought about putting the word challenge in quotes, but the selection of words should probably have the word stupidity in front of challenge.

    I knew of the fact that toddlers and perhaps small children may see these pods as colorful pieces of candy. Due to that, parents might need an extra reminder to store them safely and away from tiny hands. 

    I also heard and understood that patients experiencing dementia symptoms may also be confused by their colorful nature. There is an illness connection to that confusion, so again clearly a logical conclusion.

  • VAF information sessions prepare companies to apply for funding

     Early-stage businesses, or even those that are more established, often find it hard to land the right cash infusion, especially when traditional bank financing can be elusive. Under this common scenario, funding through the Venture Acceleration Fund (VAF) could be the needed boost.

    Information sessions to help businesses apply for VAF are taking place in Northern New Mexico until Feb. 9, when the application process officially opens. Applications for funding will be accepted until March 12. 

    According to Carla Rachkowski, associate director of the Regional Development Corp. (RDC), which administers the program, VAF has been key as seed financing for early-stage businesses for more than a decade. The point, she said, is to assist entrepreneurs with taking innovations to market more quickly. VAF helps them through marketing and technology development, proof-of-concept, prototyping, developing market share and product launch. Sometimes it’s used to leverage more funding.

  • The legislative life: Part-time, unpaid, fixed-length sessions? Not quite.

     Legislators go to meetings. That’s what they do.

    Legislators also get a lot of mail, both paper delivered by the postal service and email. Some of the mail, maybe much of it, is read. The proportion of read mail might be a measure of legislator diligence or engagement. 

    Our legislators are described as unpaid, part-time, citizen legislators who meet in fixed-length sessions or 30 and 60 days in alternate years. 

    None of this is quite true. 

    Though legislators get no salary, there is a $164 per diem to allegedly cover expenses during the session in Santa Fe or for other legislative business, such as interim committee meetings. The amount is laughable. Few decent hotel rooms in Santa Fe cost less than $164.

  • Science Fair at Barranca Mesa
  • Council paves way for apartment complex

    Los Alamos County Council unanimously approved the donation of county-owned land on DP Road Tuesday to Bethel Development Corporation, to pave the way for the development of an affordable housing apartment complex.

    The land is parcel A-9, located at 120 DP Road, between the Knights of Columbus Clubhouse and a county firefighting training facility.

    “We go to a lot of communities. This one has been so supportive in our efforts to redouble affordable housing in the community, that it’s refreshing to have that kind of support,” said Bethel President Daniel Terlecki, in his reaction to the vote.

    Bethel wants to build a four building, 72-unit complex on the site.

    The project would border a section of Canyon Rim Trail, which concerns Councilor Antonio Maggiore.

    “When you talk about desert landscaping, does that mean a lot of gravel,” Maggiore asked.

    Terlecki also said there will be greenery on the property.

    “We lean toward a lot of trees for that shading factor,” Terlecki said.

    Maggiore was concerned that the property would not have a buffer between the trail and the apartment complex.

    Terlecki then said they were planning on putting a buffer of year-round pine trees in that section.

  • LAHS picks up bounce-back win over Taos

    Led by 20 points from sophomore guard Gavin Campos, the Los Alamos High School boys’ basketball team got back on track Tuesday evening, defeating Taos High School 82-62.

    Heading into the matchup, many questions surrounded the Hilltoppers, notably the health of two of the team’s best players.

    Senior guards Antonio Trujillo and Ramon Roybal missed time over the past week with injuries, and it was uncertain whether either would be able to play against Taos.

    As it turned out, both were good to go and played significant minutes, though neither started.

    In their places, Campos and David Owen, a junior, entered the starting lineup at the guard positions.

    Campos began scoring almost immediately, collecting 6 quick points in the first quarter, a time when the rest of the team was struggling to find an offensive rhythm.

    Senior forward Troy Hammock, who has been a key offensive contributor in recent weeks, picked up 4 points in the first quarter.

    Despite those contributions, the Hilltoppers trailed Taos 15-14 after the first quarter, as the Tigers knocked down three 3-pointers in the quarter.

    The offensive production picked up significantly for the Hilltoppers in the second quarter, with players consistently knocking down jump shots.

  • LAHS drops two weekend games

    Playing games on back-to-back days isn’t easy for a basketball team under any circumstances. Doing it without the team’s best player makes it even more challenging.

    This was the situation facing the Los Alamos High School boys’ basketball team last weekend, as it lost at home to Belen High School, and on the road to Santa Fe High School without the services of senior guard Antonio Trujillo.

    Trujillo, who has averaged more than 13 points per game this season, was on the bench with an injury in both games.
    The impact of him being out of the lineup was noticed immediately at the start of Friday’s game against Belen, as the Eagles jumped on top of the Hilltoppers 13-8 in the first quarter, and LAHS connected on just three shots. Two of those three shots were 3-pointers from Michael Naranjo and Ivan Balakirev, two of the team’s big men.

    Getting the ball to the big men continued to be the theme for the Hilltoppers in the second quarter, as all 10 points the team scored in the quarter came from Balakirev, Naranjo and Troy Hammock, another of the team’s inside presences.

    Heading into halftime, LAHS trailed 28-18. None of the Hilltopper guards scored in the first half, as Balakirev led the way with 7 points, Hammock had 6 points and Naranjo added 5 points.