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Today's News

  • Comcast to improve lines on Trinity Drive next week

    Beginning on Monday, Comcast will remove and replace aerial cable lines located along Trinity Drive from 37th Street to Canyon View as part of a network improvement project for Los Alamos area customers.  

    Work will take place from 10 p.m.-5 a.m. Monday and Tuesday.

    There will be single lane closures and a flagging operation guiding traffic through the work zone.
    All residents and businesses along the work corridor will receive door tags informing them of the project dates and times.

    For questions about this project, contact CableCom project supervisor Tim Stroman at 505-417-0219.

  • LA’s Granzow earns state record in weightlifting

    Last weekend, Kim Granzow broke several weightlifting records in her age and weight class, qualifying for the 2018 Nationals Masters Championships to be held in Buffalo, New York. She represented CrossFit Los Alamos at the summer meet held at The Miller Gym in Santa Fe.

    Granzow tied one state record for the 63 kg weight class of the 60-64 year old women’s age group and broke two other records. She tied her old record of 30 kg in the snatch and broke the previous state record from 2011 in the clean and jerk by lifting 39 kg. She also earned the state record for her total of 69 kg.

    While she had done some light weight training in college, it wasn’t until Granzow decided to try CrossFit in Los Alamos in 2012 that she learned the sport of weightlifting. Also referred to as “Olympic lifting” because it is the only barbell sport in the Olympic Games, weightlifting has two events: the snatch and the clean and jerk. In the snatch, the lifter takes the barbell from the ground to overhead in one movement; in the clean and jerk, the barbell goes from the ground to the shoulders and then from the shoulders to overhead.

  • Art exhibit expressly for canine critics debuts in NYC

    NEW YORK (AP) — You won’t find any pictures of dogs playing poker at DoGUMENTA.
    A three-day art exhibition curated expressly for dogs is attracting hundreds of canines to a marina in lower Manhattan, where hounds and terriers are feasting their eyes, and in some cases their mouths, on nearly a dozen masterpieces created expressly for them.

    The idea is the brainchild of former Washington Post art critic Jessica Dawson, who says she was inspired by her rescue dog Rocky, a tiny morkie (Yorkie-Maltese mix), who regularly joins her at exhibits of the human variety.

    “When Rocky accompanied me on my gallery visits I noticed that he was having a much better time than I was,” explains Dawson, who moved to New York four years ago. “He was not reading the New York Times reviews, he was not reading the artists’ resumes, and so I said he has something to teach me about looking, and all dogs have something to teach us about looking at contemporary art and being with it.”

    Organizers of the exhibit, which takes its name from Documenta, which takes place every five years in Kassel, Germany, and put on by Arts at Brookfield, staggered the arrival times of the dogs to keep things orderly.

  • Pet Talk: Mobile veterinarians provide care at home

    Whether you are taking your animal in for their regular check-up or making an emergency visit, being evaluated by a veterinarian is a critical part in your pet’s health. But what if an animal is too sick or injured to be transported to the clinic? Some animals, such as livestock, may even require a trailer for transport. Luckily for pet and livestock owners, mobile veterinarians are there to help.

    Leslie Easterwood, clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained the important role mobile veterinarians play in animal health.

    “The most common reason for an owner to use a mobile veterinarian is so that they do not have to transport their animal to a hospital,” Easterwood said. “There could be a variety of reasons why having the veterinarian come to the farm or home is better, such as situations where there are several animals to be treated or the owner does not have access to a livestock trailer.”

  • Pet of the Week 8-13-17

    Meet Ball, the Los Alamos Animal Shelter’s Pet of the Week. Ball is a handsome Shar-Pei mix with soft, short- to mid-length, curled fur who is looking for a forever home. Ball has been at the shelter since July 24.

    Ball is about 1 year old and knows some basic commands, like “sit” and “lay down.” Ball is smart, playful and has the biggest personality. Although he might be a little shy in new situations, Ball will quickly warm up to a buddy willing to play with him. Ball also loves to snuggle and will hold hands if someone stops petting him.

    Ball can be protective of his home, but does not climb, jump or dig under a fence.

    He is up-to-date on all shots and vaccinations, so Ball is available for adoption.
    For more information on this sweet boy, contact the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter at 662-8179, or email police-psa@lacnm.us.

    Photo by Paulina Gwaltney Photography, 910-333-6362. Gwaltney’s studio is located at 3500 Trinity Drive.

  • Police Beat 8-13-17

    Police Beat items are compiled from public information contained in Los Alamos Police Department Records. Charges or citations listed in Police Beat do not imply innocence or guilt. The Los Alamos Police Department uses the term “arrest” to define anyone who has been physically arrested, served a court summons, or issued a citation.

    Aug. 3
    10:20 a.m.—Aleah Stahl, 36 of Los Alamos was arrested on a magistrate court bench warrant.

    3:43 p.m.—Trevor Ray Martin, 21, of Albuquerque was arrested on Trinity Drive for possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia.

    5:06 p.m.—Monique Daisy Badonie, 22, of Albuquerque was arrested on a municipal court warrant.

    11:00 p.m.—Brock Koehler, 29, of Los Alamos was arrested for a warrant related to a misdemeanor in another jurisdiction.

    Aug. 4
    9:30 a.m.—LAPD reported a semi-feral kitten bit an individual while trying to contain the feline.

    9:27 a.m.—Police reported a dog bite.

    10:50 p.m.—Los Alamos Police investigated a report of harassment.

    Aug. 5
    3:51 p.m.—A bicycle was found at Urban Park and turned into the Los Alamos Police Department.

    Aug. 6

  • Letter to the Editor 8-13-17

    You can be conservative and in favor of
    improvements

    Dear Editor,
    It was a great pleasure to see Tony Fox insist that the council recognize that voting against the rec bond is not identical with voting against the rec projects. One may be fiscally conservative and still be in favor of some quality of life improvements and infrastructure development.

    And while Dr. (Lisa) Shin is indeed correct that quantification is not precise, it is certainly clear that everyone who voted for the bond is also in favor of the projects. Now if only one in 10 fiscal conservatives are nonetheless also in favor of at least some of the rec projects, a small fraction, then there is also a majority in favor of those projects.

    It is good that the CIP funds will be reviewed for how much we can already afford. However, we certainly can afford something. The improvement of Ashley (Pond) Park is an example of how much can be added to our enjoyment of Los Alamos.

  • GOP needs to get in line with debt limit

    There seem to be two kinds of Republicans: those who think that the full faith and credit of the United States can be the subject of political experimentation, and sensible ones.

    Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin fits in the latter category. He has repeatedly called upon Congress, controlled by the GOP, to pass an increase in the statutory debt limit, with no policy strings attached, so that the United States government may continue borrowing past the current, already expired ceiling of $20 trillion – and pay all of its obligations on time. The stability of the financial system, domestic and international, depends on preserving the “risk-free” status of U.S. debt, earned over centuries. A failure to raise the debt limit would imperil this status, causing a “serious problem,” as Mr. Mnuchin has put it with considerable understatement.

  • Mexico’s troubles affect the U.S.

    What happens in Mexico doesn’t stay in Mexico.

    Our southern neighbor is wrestling with an alarming surge in cartel violence, a U.S. security crackdown on its northern border and a glut of migrant refugees slipping through its back door.  All of which affects us directly or indirectly.

    The situation demands our attention and a redoubling of efforts to create sound, effective policy.

    Simply put, an unstable and unsafe Mexico isn’t good for Texas. Our economies are too entwined. Mexico is our No. 1 trade partner by far. It’s also not good for American industries that depend on lucrative trade deals and cheaper labor supplied by immigrants chasing the American dream. And it’s not good for American communities struggling with the consequences of illicit drugs flowing into cities, suburbs and rural hamlets.

    Let’s start with the uptick in homicides. There’s no way to romanticize the resurgence in cartel conflicts that are turning once-tranquil towns in Mexico into killing fields.

    The Mexican government’s war on drugs and cartels isn’t working. Mexico is on pace for its deadliest year with 12,155 murders recorded from January through June.

  • Serving and spiking with a purpose

    Sometimes it is difficult for a coach to know what kind of team they have until they step onto the court for the first time.

    That is the case for Los Alamos High School volleyball coach Diana Stokes, who enters this season with more questions than answers when it comes to her team, and their competition.

    For Stokes’ team, the season will be defined by the play of its young players. As the first week of practice winds down, she believes the players will be spread evenly among the class levels.

    “I think we should have three seniors, four juniors and three sophomores,” Stokes said. “So we are going to be pretty young.”

    While she looks at the positive of this spread as being able to build a strong program for the next few years, she is unsure how it will all come together this year.

    “We are going to have a tough road, especially the first part of our season,” Stokes said.

    The team will be tested early, with its second game of the year coming against St. Pius X, the defending state champions.

    “I expect them to take state again,” Stokes said. “They should have all seniors this year. Last year, they won state with all juniors, so they could be even stronger this year.”