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Today's News

  • 'Toppers baseball and softball each take two from Española

    Los Alamos' baseball and softball teams each won a pair of games against District 2-5A rival Española Valley Saturday.

    While the Hilltopper girls beat Española twice by the mercy rule, 11-1 and 13-3, both baseball games were tight and tense throughout.

    Los Alamos won the first baseball game 3-0 and the second game 6-5 in extra innings.

    "That was a blast," Los Alamos head baseball coach Mike Gill said.
    "We just held in there and got the job done."

    After winning the first game, Los Alamos struck first in the second game with a two-run second inning.

    Española cut the lead in half in the third and then took a 3-2 lead in the fifth.

    Los Alamos responded by taking the lead back in the bottom of the fifth, but Española rallied again in the sixth to take the lead once again, 5-4.

    Down to its final out in the seventh, Zealand Waltersheid hit an RBI single, scoring Jarrett Genero and sending the game into extra innings.

  • Hoffman, Zurek are honored by LANL

    Darleane Hoffman and Wojciech Zurek are 2014 Los Alamos Medal recipients, the highest honor bestowed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory, LANL’s press office announced Thursday.
    “Darleane Hoffman’s distinguished career and her contributions to nuclear science and actinide chemistry make her a trailblazer and role model for all women in science, while Wojciech Zurek’s world-renowned work in quantum theory has inspired Nobel Laureates and provided a bridge between classical and quantum mechanics,” said LANL Director Charlie McMillan. “Los Alamos does not necessarily award a medal each year, preferring instead to wait to bestow the honor only upon a prestigious subset of nominees who have demonstrated the highest levels of scientific achievement. This year’s recipients are well worth the wait.”
    The Los Alamos Medal was established in 2001 to honor those who have contributed to the laboratory at the highest level. The Los Alamos Medal recognizes individuals who have made a contribution that changed the course of science, a major enhancement of LANL’s ability to accomplish its mission, a significant impact on sustainability and/or established a major direction for the lab and the nation.

  • Lewis & Todd 4-26-15
  • Word on the Street 4-26-15

    Teen Pulse staff writer Wilbur Wang asked students, “If you could be an exchange student to another country, which one would you choose?”

  • Exchange student from Serbia expands her horizons in U.S.

    Every year, Los Alamos High School hosts a group of foreign exchange students who apply through various global programs such as the Rotary’s Youth Exchange, to explore American culture in depth.
    Srna Petrovic, an 18-year-old senior from Serbia, is one such student who views her exchange experience as an opportunity to “see how other people live in a different part of the world.” To her, being an exchange student means to “go somewhere where you have never been before and to stay with someone that you have never met before.”
    Petrovic applied for the exchange program because she “loved traveling and exploring new cities.” Originally, Petrovic wanted to be located near the ocean, but despite the fact that she was placed in Los Alamos, the opposite of a seaport town, she said she has come to love the mountains and sunsets.
    For Petrovic, the language barrier was nonexistent. Her proficiency in English, allowed her to observe the full swing of the American school system, as well as many different United States’ holidays, her favorite being Thanksgiving.
    Petrovic notes that in Serbia, she has “15 subjects each year, which [she] cannot choose.” There are also no clubs or extracurriculars available.

  • News for retirees 4-26-15 to 5-1-15

    April 26-May 2, 2015
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.
    Betty Ehart
    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Tater tot casserole
    Noon        Grief support
    12:15 p.m.        Smart Driver class
    2 p.m.        Pinochle
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Variety training
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Chicken tacos
    1 p.m.         MindBody massage
    1:30 p.m.         “Friends” meeting
    1:30 p.m.        Party bridge
    6 p.m.        Mahjong
    7 p.m.        Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table tennis

  • Great expectations for ourselves and our children

    “If your children are no better than you are, you have fathered them in vain, indeed you have lived in vain,” according to Alexander Solzhenitsyn in “Cancer Ward.”
    Actually, I am not satisfied merely if my children are better than I am, for I have set that bar rather low. At the very least, my goal is that my children will be above average, better than their peers.
    I am not speaking of academic ability. We are drowning in evidence of academic strengths and weaknesses, based on required standardized testing.
    Instead, I am thinking of positive youth development, sometimes referred to as character development.
    Do people view me as a man of integrity? Do people view my children as people of integrity? Are they contributing members of society, in their families, at the workplace, and in their churches?
    Psychology is not as accurate when it comes to measuring positive youth development. It is a more subjective domain — the evidence is easier to misinterpret and exaggerate.
    A large amount of research in psychology is based on survey data, in which people describe themselves.

  • Credit score updates people should know

    Credit scoring has evolved over the last three decades and this fall, FICO made one more important change.
    Borrowers who have struggled with medical debt and those with a limited credit history might see better FICO numbers in the future. Even if these situations don’t apply to you, understanding how credit scoring is changing can help you better manage your credit over time.
    FICO Score 9, rolled out last fall, is described as a more “nuanced” version of the original FICO Score that the leading credit scoring company introduced in 1989.
    It is offered by three major credit bureaus — Equifax, Experian and TransUnion. It now bypasses collection agency accounts and weighs medical debt differently than non-medical debt on a person’s credit record.
    Borrowers with a median score of 711 whose only negative credit data comes from medical collections will see their credit score go up 25 points under the new system.
    As for consumers with limited credit histories — what the industry calls “thin files” — FICO says the new system will better determine the ability of someone in that situation to repay a debt.

  • On Schedule 4-26-15

    Tuesday
    Lacrosse: Los Alamos at Sandia Prep, varsity, 5:30 p.m.

    Baseball: Los Alamos at Bernalillo, junior varsity, 4 p.m.

    Softball: Los Alamos at Bernalillo, junior varsity, 4 p.m.

    Wednesday
    Baseball: Bernalillo at Los Alamos, varsity, 4 p.m.

    Softball: Bernalillo at Los Alamos, varsity, 4 p.m.

    Friday
    Track: Los Alamos at home quad, varsity, 11 a.m.

    Lacrosse: Sandia at Los Alamos, varsity, 5:30 p.m.

    Baseball: Del Norte at Los Alamos, junior varsity, 3 p.m., 5 p.m.

    Saturday

    Baseball: Los Alamos at Del Norte, varsity, 3 p.m., 5 p.m.

    Softball: Los Alamos at Del Norte, varsity, 3 p.m., 5 p.m.

    Lacrosse: Los Alamos at Cibola, varsity, 4:30 p.m.
     

  • Santa Fe throwing parade for Rotich

    SANTA FE (AP) — The city of Santa Fe is holding a parade for a Santa Fe resident who won the Boston Marathon.
    Officials announced this week the city and other groups will sponsor a parade on Monday in honor of Caroline Rotich.
    Rotich, who has lived and trained in Santa Fe for about five years, used a late kick to bust through the tape first among the women runners in the 119th running of the prestigious event.
    The 30-year-old Rotich says she spends nine to 10 months a year training in Santa Fe. She also runs in Albuquerque’s bosque.
    Rotich was born in Kenya.
    Officials say Rotich will be in the parade.