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Today's News

  • LA’s Serena Birnbaum awarded Girl Scout Gold Award

    Serena Birnbaum from Los Alamos has earned the Girl Scout Gold Award, the highest and most prestigious achievement in Girl Scouting.

    The Gold Award, which challenges Girl Scouts to make a difference in their communities, is presented to fewer than 6 percent of Girl Scouts each year.

    The award is recognized by colleges and employers.  

    Birnbaum’s project “Choir Risers” addressed the need to support the arts program at Los Alamos High School. 

    The current risers were decades old and rickety. Birnbaum said she “hopes future students benefit from a rehearsal space that is well equipped and conducive to an active learning environment.” 

    “I learned a lot from this project including how important it is to support what you enjoy in life,” she said. “I learned about leadership and what it means to be in charge of a large scale project. This knowledge contributed to my growth as a person and leader because it gave me valuable experience and knowledge that I will use throughout my life.”

    Other Los Alamos awardees include Kaya Loy, Emily McLaughlin, Jaida Connolly, Isabel Meana, Seanna Shedd and Katelyn Tapia. All Bronze awardees, the highest award a junior level team can achieve.

  • Assets in Action: ‘Happy Everything’ to all – time to celebrate

    This is a such a great time of year for so many reasons, that I thought it might be nice to address some pitfalls, before they take place.

    “Happy Holidays” is a general term of greeting exchanged this time of year. There is no disrespect to anyone involved, it is just a holiday greeting akin to, “have a nice day.” There are so many things being celebrated this time of year and this is the opportunity to embrace them all.

    I enjoyed a commercial I heard recently from KOAT’s Doug Fernandez. He said that he loves the fact that they call it the holiday season because of how long we celebrate. I feel exactly the same way, it starts Oct. 1 with decorating for Halloween and goes for a solid five to six months.

    It really kicks in as Thanksgiving approaches and you can wish everyone happy holidays and cover all of the bases. You can’t tell by sight what someone celebrates, but happy holidays kind of says it all.

    This is the time of year that some people get ruffled that you may seem disrespectful by not saying, Merry Christmas and I say not at all. You are just being respectful of everyone. If you disagree or think you do, then I challenge you to Google, can a non-Jewish person wish someone a Happy Hanukkah? Go ahead, I dare you to do it anyway.

  • USFS visitor map price to increase

    USDA Forest Service visitor maps will increase in price from $10 to $14 effective Jan. 1.

    Rising costs of production, printing, and distribution have driven the need for the price increase of the paper and plastic-coated visitor maps, the first such increase in almost a decade. The agency continually updates its maps, seeking to enhance them as well. The Forest Service also expects to shorten the revision cycle as its cartographers continue applying new digital technology to the map revision process. 

    The agency is also working to increase the availability of digital maps, which cost $4.99 per side. Digital maps for mobile applications can be downloaded at avenza.com/pdf-maps/store. 

    As always, forest visitor maps are available for sale at those Forest Service offices in Arizona and New Mexico that currently sell them. 

    Volume purchases are available from the National Forest Map Store and can be ordered at NationalForestStore.com or by phone at 406-329-3024.

    To help offset the price increase for volume sales, discount pricing will now be available to all customers starting Jan. 1.

    Discounted maps are only available when purchased through the NFMS.

  • Chromium plume safety discussed at Voices of Los Alamos meeting

    BY BARBARA CALEF
    League of Women Voters of Los Alamos

    Because the existence of a chromium plume in the regional aquifer below Sandia and Mortendad Canyons has been a source of concern for citizens of northern New Mexico, Voices of Los Alamos asked experts to discuss the problem at a meeting on Nov. 27.

    Danny Katzman is the Technical Program Director for LANL’s chromium project and a hydrogeologist.  Katzman began by saying that he was working on a way to explain the complicated technical project, putting together FAQs (frequently asked questions) for the DOE website. This is now posted at the linkenergy.gov/sites/prod/files/2017/11/f46/Chromium-Project-Fact-Sheet-Fall-2017-FINAL.pdf.

    Katzman explained that chromium occurs in two forms: chromium-3 or trivalent, which is harmless, and chromium-6 or hexavalent, which is toxic to humans. The hexavalent form, which dissolves in water, is used for chrome plating. At the lab it was used to prevent corrosion in the power plant cooling towers from 1956 to 1972. During that time about 160,000 pounds of excessive concentrations were released into Sandia Canyon.

  • UNM-LA to close for winter Dec. 22

    The University of New Mexico-Los Alamos will close for winter break from Dec. 22 through Jan. 2.
    There will be no classes or activities, and buildings will be closed.

    Throughout the year, UNM-LA strives to keep the community notified about weather delays, cancellations, closures and emergencies, through the media, the UNM-LA website, and the UNM-Los Alamos Facebook page. Additionally, students, faculty, and staff can sign up for text message LoboAlerts at loboalerts.unm.edu

    The UNM-LA campus, at 4000 University Dr., will reopen on Jan. 3, with classes beginning Jan. 16.

    UNM–LA is an innovative, rigorous and affordable comprehensive branch community college that provides foundations for transfer, leading-edge career programs, and lifelong learning opportunities.

  • Cedar Crest woman brews up business with help from nonprofit lender

    By FINANCE NEW MEXICO

    Hannah Johnson left Cedar Crest, New Mexico, to get a biology degree, and after a stint in shorebird conservation, she returned to start a coffee shop in her hometown in the eastern Sandia Mountain foothills.

    The owner of Cabra Coffee, which opened in spring 2017, started making quality coffee at college. “My first job working in the industry was when I was going to school at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma. It was just the coffee shop in the school, but we were getting coffee from a cafe in Seattle, and they would come down and train us. That’s where I first learned how to make coffee professionally.”

    During her subsequent conservation work with the piping plover at Massachusetts Audubon, Hannah found that her side job in a coffee shop brought her more joy because it offered social interaction. “I wasn’t working with anybody, … and I needed a way to make friends. The coffee shop (in Nantucket) was brand new. I realized that I knew more than anybody else there just from working at the coffee shop at my school. So I was put into the manager position, overseeing everything to do with the coffee. And that’s when I really discovered that it was something I liked doing and that I was good at.”

  • Atomic City Update: Ice rink provides unique experience for all hockey fans

    After going to a large number of sporting events since coming to Los Alamos, the prize for best atmosphere and experience so far has to go to the one I had at the home opener for the Los Alamos High School ice hockey team last weekend against Taos.

    The venue may be smaller than any other event I have been to, but the sense of community felt among the hockey fans in attendance was unmatched. A big part of it has to do with the small venue, and how close everyone is to the action.

    There are very few places to sit at the rink. The vast majority of people stand around the ice and watch right through the glass. Everyone has the opportunity to have a big collision occur right where they are standing, and there is not a bad place to watch the action.

    As the players step onto the ice, they high-fived a group of children stationed right outside the entrance gate, and the smiles on the kid’s faces was a joy to see.

    Because of the small area, there is no sense of separation that exists in other sports. The players are free to interact with spectators before taking the ice, and even in between periods.

    It really helps to make everyone feel like they are a part of the action.

    Overall, the experience felt more like a family get-together, as opposed to a normal sporting event.

  • LAHS girls basketball struggles at early season tournament

    The first two games of the Joe Armijo Classic in Albuquerque didn’t go the way the Los Alamos High School girls basketball team envisioned, continuing a rough start to the year.

    The Hilltoppers dropped games Thursday and Friday against Las Cruces High School and Cleveland High School, both by large margins.

    Thursday’s game saw LAHS match up against Las Cruces, the top ranked team in Class 6A.

    Almost immediately, the game got out of hand. In the first quarter, Las Cruces jumped out to a 22-4 lead, as sophomore Becca Green was the only Hilltopper able to get into the scoring column.

    Las Cruces used the full-court press against the Hilltoppers to perfection, forcing turnovers and limiting offensive opportunities. That, combined with the team’s prowess on the offensive end of the floor, made things impossible for LAHS.

    At halftime, the Hilltoppers trailed 45-12.

    As the time clock ticked down in the second half, the deficit for LAHS widened as offense continued to be hard to come by.

    After three quarters, Las Cruces led 64-17, and the entire fourth quarter was played with a running clock, which allowed the entire quarter to be played in less than 10 minutes.

    As time expired, Las Cruces walked away with a 70-26 win.

  • LAMS Native Hawks celebrate Feast Day at UNM-LA

    Last week, the Los Alamos Middle School Native Hawks celebrated a Feast Day, as Native American Heritage month came to an end.

    Throughout the month, students attended a special gathering at the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos, to spend time with Native poets and potters. The artisans shared their talents and backgrounds inspiring young students for the future.

    The Native Hawks “Rocked their Mocs,” and spent the early portion of the month fundraising for a school project.

    Students sold turquoise ribbons and scented pencils to raise $200 to share their culture with their fellow hawks. Several local residents were inspired by their efforts and made  donations to support their work.

    The fundraising was not to benefit their club directly, but to create awareness of local cultures for their fellow students.

    A Feast Day would give a real world learning opportunity to all hawks as they came together to sample cuisine.

    The Native Hawks raised the funds to hire Chef Norma Naranjo to bake Native American items to share. Narano of, The Feasting Place, baked Indian cookies, Horno Bread and Pies that arrived fresh in the morning, straight from the Okay Owingeh, also called the San Juan Pueblo. Her husband Hutch and master of the horno, is from the Santa Clara Puebo.

  • PEEC announces special holiday hours

    The Los Alamos Nature Center will be closed Dec. 24, Dec. 25 and Jan. 1 and open all other days in December and January.

    The nature center is free, and offers a great place to bring family to orient to the Pajarito Plateau before venturing outside or to the neighboring national parks and preserve.

    People of all ages enjoy exploring the nature center’s interactive exhibits, watching the local wildlife, discovering more about the geology of our area, and exploring the unique collection of nature-inspired items in their gift shop.

    The Los Alamos Nature Center, located at 2600 Canyon Road, is open from 10 AM to 4 PM on

    Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays as well as 1-4 p.m. on Sundays. The nature center is open late on Tuesdays, until 8 p.m., closed Thursdays for regular maintenance.