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Today's News

  • Village of Galisteo to celebrate 30th Anniversary Studio Tour

     A short drive from Santa Fe in the magnificent Galisteo Basin, the historic village of Galisteo will celebrate its 30th Annual Studio Tour from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Oct. 14-15. 

    Over 25 artists and craftsmen will open their studios to share photography, painting, ceramic art, jewelry, handmade knives, traditional straw inlay, sculpture and weaving. 

    For more detailed information, directions, and artists’ pages, go to galisteostudiotour.org or call 505-466-3541.   

  • PEEC’s Forest Explorers program to continue

    The Pajarito Environmental Education Center’s popular summer program for 5 to 8 year olds will return this fall. Forest Explorers, a hike-and-play club, will take children on hikes from 1-3 p.m. every other Wednesday from Oct. 4 through Dec. 13 and give kids ample time for child-directed play in nature.Forest Explorers is a drop-off program that will meet at the Los Alamos Nature Center every other Wednesday at 1 p.m. for a total of six outings this fall. The hikes will take kids into the nearby canyon where kids will be able to build forts, make seasonal observations, and learn to identify different plants and animals. The Forest Explorers class is taught by educator Denise Matthews and will allow children to have fun outside while working cooperatively, building gross motor skills, and learning more about the local ecology

    Matthews leads the Nature Playtimes program for PEEC and also serves as an instructor for the year-round Pebble Pups club, school field trips, and classroom visits. She has taught science in the classroom and as an environmental educator for the past 12 years. Matthews is passionate about providing kids the opportunity to connect with the local environment through child-directed outdoor exploration and inquiry.

  • Elevate vacations to new levels with a heli-hiking adventure

    BY DEBBIE STONE

     

    Special to the Monitor

    He seemed like such a nice guy. That was the group’s initial impression of our hiking guide, Paul – a mellow, wry humored Canuck. 

    Paul appeared calm and assuring as he gathered us around to talk about our first hike of the day. Moments before, the helicopter had gently set us down in front of Howser Towers, an impressive set of peaks in the Bugaboos, a range within the Columbia Mountains of British Columbia. 

    The name “Bugaboo” actually means a hoax in Old English. Story has it that when folks came up here looking for gold, they found only pyrite, or fool’s gold, so they aptly called the area the Bugaboos and the name stuck. 

  • Valles Caldera to offer fall star parties

    Valles Caldera National Preserve will host two star parties this fall, one on Saturday from 7-10:30 p.m. and another on Oct. 14 from 6:30-10 p.m. To minimize light pollution, gates will close 1.5 hours after the event begins, so late arrivals risk not being able to participate.
    These star parties will take place near the Valle Grande Entrance Station. Park staff and educators from the Pajarito Environmental Education Center will provide short talks, telescopes for viewing, and youth activities. Visitors are encouraged to bring personal telescopes, blankets, and chairs for their stargazing pleasure. The Valle Grande Bookstore, operated by Los Amigos de Valles Caldera, will have hot drinks and snacks, as well as books and gifts, available for purchase.
    “We are excited to share these remarkable night skies with our visitors,” said Superintendent Jorge Silva-Bañuelos. “The preserve’s distance from nearby towns allows for almost unimpaired star gazing.”
    Although light-use should be limited as much as possible, visitors are encouraged to come prepared with a red-tinted light source. Visitors should also dress in layers, as nighttime temperatures regularly drop to 20-30 degrees Fahrenheit.

  • Play reading at LALT set for Sept. 26

    The public is invited to the Performing Arts Center at 7 p.m. Sept. 26, for an open play reading of “Neverwhere,” a rousing, eye-popping, modern urban fairy tale.
    Richard Mayhew leads a boring, rat-race of a life until the night he rescues the wounded Lady Door on the streets of London. Richard’s selfless act turns his life inside-out and leads him into the strange, shadowy world of London Below, a kingdom of sewer tunnels and abandoned
    Underground stations, home to the forgotten and discarded people of London Above. Richard desperately wants his old life back, but first he needs to help Door find out who wants her dead, and why. Along the way, he’ll meet earls and marquises, hunters and blackfriars, and noble rats. He’ll face the Great Beast of London and an angel named Islington. And in the end, he may become the hero Below he could never be Above.
    An adaptation by Robert Kauzlaric, based on Neil Gaiman’s modern classic, “Neverwhere” is being proposed for performance at Los Alamos Little Theatre in September 2018.
    The Performing Arts Center is located at 1670 Nectar St., Los Alamos.

  • Community Calendar

    TODAY
    Nature Pirate Treasure Hunt from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Come to the nature center to make a chest and fill it with natural treasures. Free.
    THURSDAY
    Summer Nature Painting
from 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. Enjoy botanical drawing and watercolor with Santa Fe artist Lisa Coddington. Cost is $56 for members, $70 for non-members.
    FRIDAY
    Los Alamos Piecemakers Quilt Guild “Tomorrow’s Heirlooms” Quilt Show from 9 a.m.– 5 p.m. at the Crossroads Bible Church in Los Alamos. Tickets for the show are $2 for adults and $1 for children under 12. There will be vendors from all over New Mexico, a silent auction and numerous quilts and other hand-made items to view. Tickets will be available for the Donation Quilt “Spinning Stars.”

    Los Alamos Little Theatre will present Alan Ayckbourn’s “Communicating Doors,” a time-traveling murder mystery, beginning at 7:30 p.m. at the Los Alamos Little Theatre, 1670 Nectar St. Performances will be 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays Sept. 22-23. Visit lalt.org for more information.
    SATURDAY

  • Time to ask, ‘What makes us awesome’

    If you are struggling in your relationship with a teenager or have a senior that will graduate this year, you must read any books by Patricia Hoolihan.
    Recently I came across one of her quotes that might re-define how we see things today. “A pat on the back, though only a few vertebrae removed from a kick in the pants, is miles ahead in results.” – Bennett Cerf
    There was a time when we praised kids so much, we were worried about damaging them, but now I wonder if we have let the pendulum swing too far the other way.
    In 2013, two high school students Faith Glasco and Elizabeth Hjelvik started, “The Wall of Awesome,” in Los Alamos. I am proud that their efforts still continue on a smaller scale today, but I am asking you to take it one step further.
    Take a minute this week to ask your kids one of two questions…or both would be great. What makes you awesome? What makes life awesome?
    The answers might just surprise you and they may struggle, just make sure you pause long enough to make them think about it. I also suggest you have an answer for them when they have nothing.

  • Don’t let Gov. Martinez politicize science education

    BY REP. G. ANDRES ROMERO AND BILL MCCAMLEY
    NM House of Representatives

  • Celebrate the sunshine and N.M.’s low disaster risk

    In my garage is an old suitcase packed with old clothes. It’s to grab in an emergency. 

    There’s a sturdy canvas bag tucked away in a suitable place, where a couple of checkbooks are kept and a backup computer hard drive is stored.

    Because I live in central New Mexico, I probably will never need those things. New Mexico is a pretty good place to avoid natural disasters.  

    The state is ranked 40th out of 50 states for the number of disaster declarations and 33rd of 50 for relative riskiness by the company Core Logic, based on an analysis of storm damage.

    But, this week as we appreciate the sunshine and our dry feet, let’s be relaxed but not complacent. The recent hurricanes remind us that disasters can happen anytime and anywhere. What could happen here? What can we prepare for, individually or collectively?

  • Police: N.M. justice system is broken

    BY SUSAN MONTOYA
    Associated Press

    ALBUQUERQUE — New Mexico’s top law enforcement officer said Friday the state’s criminal justice system is broken, overtasked and strained by a lack of resources.

    State Police Chief Pete Kassetas’ comments came as he and San Juan County authorities provided an update on a recent traffic stop in Farmington in which police shot and killed a suspect after he pulled a revolver from his waistband and opened fire.

    One of the rounds wounded a state police officer when it struck his badge and sent shrapnel flying.
    Kassetas described the case of 26-year-old William Wilson as a classic example of the problems facing New Mexico’s justice system. He outlined Wilson’s criminal history, which stretched back several years and included numerous charges and a host of probation violations, and noted that he had been arrested 17 times and was a self-admitted gang member.

    Authorities say Wilson was released from prison in May to the custody of the county jail due to a pending case involving aggravated burglary, larceny and firearm charges. Court records show he was released from the jail just weeks before the shooting after being fitted with an ankle monitor.