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Today's News

  • LANL interns face housing shortage

    Students arriving this summer for internships at the Los Alamos National Laboratory will face a tough challenge trying to find a place to stay in Los Alamos County.
    With a shortage of rooms and student housing running up against the lab’s intentions to expand its workforce by the thousands in the next several years, interns will be left with few options for housing.
    In 2016, LANL hired over 1,000 summer interns.
    Every year, stories emerge of students camping out in the Jemez or getting an apartment in Santa Fe to help them through the summer. Their stay times can last a week, a season, or only a month, making it hard to fit them into an apartment lease or some other structured rent situation in Los Alamos County, even though they may have the money to pay.   
    “Those of us who are in the business of knowing about lab students and their summer housing situation, we know it can be a near-desperate attempt to find housing for students,” said resident Stephen Boerigter, who is also the chairman of the University of New Mexico-Los Alamos Advisory Board and a member of the Los Alamos Public School District board.
    During intern season in Los Alamos, rent can range between $700 and $900. If an intern starts looking in January, they may be able to get a room for $500 for the length of their stay.

  • Music instructor looks back on 12 years of teaching

    Gregory Schneider has taught  Music Together in Los Alamos for 12 years and a new spring session is about to begin.
     “I enjoy being the first music teacher that most of my students – and sometimes their families, have ever had,” Schneider said. “It’s rewarding getting children and their families hooked on actively making music, not just passively listening to it.”
    Some of his very first students would have been in the under age 5 category with his youngest every being just 3 weeks old. Today they may very well be walking the halls of the local middle or high school and still have a love for music.
    “Even newborns respond to music in an age appropriate manner and the music they hear at that early age does imprint upon their brain even long before they can speak or sing,” Schneider said.
    Schneider explained that the Music Together curriculum is founded upon the work of researchers like Harvard Educational Psychologist Howard Gardner. Schneider explained how musical learning can make children more receptive to learning in other areas due to brain stimulation.
    Classes are taught locally on Wednesdays from 5:30-6:15 p.m. in Sherrill Hall at Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church.

  • AG: Email scammers use name of New Mexico's top judge

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — If you get an email asking for money from the chief justice of the New Mexico Supreme Court, it's a scam.

    The New Mexico Attorney General's Office warned Friday about a new email seeking to extort money, suggesting that recipients need to appear in court or face arrest if they don't pay $750.

    The poorly worded email includes Justice Charles Daniels' name and photograph but incorrectly lists his title as court clerk.

    Authorities say there have been plenty of email scams in recent years that have impersonated local police, sheriffs and even state Attorney General Hector Balderas, but this appears to be the first in which a state Supreme Court justice's name has been tapped.

    Balderas' office and the high court are warning people not to respond to the email.

  • Hilltopper girls win big at Rust Buster meet

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper girls track and field team had a big performance last weekend at the Rio Rancho Rust Buster.
    In all, nine teams, most of them Class 6A schools from the Albuquerque area took part in the Rust Buster – for many of the teams involved, it was the first meet of the season – but the Hilltopper girls earned a comfortable victory. The Hilltoppers finished with 133.6 points Saturday at Rio Rancho High School.
    Los Alamos finished comfortably ahead of the host Rio Rancho Rams to win the girls team title. The Rams picked up 109.6 points. None of the other seven teams competing in the meet factored into the decision.
    The Hilltopper boys track team also took part last Saturday, picking up third place in the nine-team meet. The Hilltopper boys earned 60.5 points, while the host Rams held off Eldorado to win the team competition.
    In the girls competition, Los Alamos picked up some big performances in the relay events to help it win that team title. Los Alamos also had a very good showing in the field events.
    The Hilltoppers won the 400-meter and 1600-meter relays, and finished second in the other two relays on the day. They had dominant performances, winning the 400 relay by nearly a second-and-a-half, while the 1600 relay team won by more than 7 seconds over runner-up Cibola in that event.

  • ’Topper softball, baseball pick up big wins

    Los Alamos’ softball team used the long ball to its full advantage Tuesday afternoon in a road victory over the Pojoaque Valley Elkettes.
    The Hilltoppers blasted three home runs in the game, the big blow a three-run shot to straightaway center field by Alicia Gonzales.
    Gonzales’ fifth-inning blast broke open a tight ballgame, putting the Hilltoppers up 7-3 at the time. Relief pitcher Reyna Lucero closed out the game after the Hilltoppers came up with two more runs to win it 9-3 at Chris Peterson Memorial Field.
    Los Alamos is off to a hot start this season, particularly at the plate, ahead of a big road doubleheader today against Class 5A Belen. Los Alamos’ offense has produced 58 runs in six games this season.
    Pojoaque Valley’s Elkettes (0-4) actually drew first blood in the game, scoring twice in the bottom of the first, but Los Alamos answered right back with a pair of runs in the top of the second. Los Alamos took the lead for good with another pair of runs in the third, those coming on its first homer of the game, that provided by Megan Romero.
    Claire Bluhm also hit a solo home run late in the game for Los Alamos (5-1) on Tuesday.

  • The public needs to keep the press honest

    BY GREG WHITE
    Los Alamos Resident, Guest Editorial

  • Trading guns across the border

    BY BOB HAGAN
    Coffee on a Cold Morning

  • Council may attach sunset clause to utility rates

    A discussion between members of the Los Alamos County Board of Public Utilities about gas rate changes and a county council liaison may lead to the council requiring sunset clauses on all rate changes the Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities makes.
    County Council Liaison and Vice Council Chair Susan O’Leary told the board that the sunset clauses are necessary.
    By adding a sunset clause to a rate, it puts a set retirement date on the rate change.
    Board Chairman Jeff Johnson disagreed with O’Leary. Johnson said there are already mechanisms in place that allow council to review rate changes, therefore a sunset clause was not necessary.
    The points were made during a discussion about whether or not the board would consider adding a sunset clause to the most recent gas rate that was approved by county council on Sept. 27, 2016.
    The rate was passed without a sunset clause.
    DPU Manager Tim Glasco told the board the reason they rushed the last-minute council approval on Sept. 27 was because they were caught off guard.

  • Lecture features effects of bomb

    BY SAM LEDOUX
    Special to the Monitor

  • LAPS board weighs bleak budget for American Indian students

    A committee tasked with providing recommendations to the Los Alamos School Board to help the district’s American Indian population succeed academically agreed to scale back its efforts in light of decreased state funding.
    “There’s a bleak picture out there for the budget and I want to be realistic about that,” School Board President Jenny McCumber told the committee members. “While all of us really appreciate all the work that’s been done, I think we need to look realistically at how much we can afford.”
    The the LAPS Title VII Parent Advisory Committee made a presentation to the board Tuesday about some of its findings and what the district could do to help.
    Areas discussed included testing results and cultural issues. There are 116 American Indian students in the school system. On the 2016 PARCC math test, American Indians scored a little over 730 in math and reading, similar to how Hispanics in the district did. Other ethnic groups tracked in the study scored higher than Hispanics and Native Americans, with Asians scoring at 780 or above.