.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Region offers variety of ways to get back to nature for Earth Day

    Visitors to Bandelier National Monument will enjoy a fee-free day and the opening of an art exhibit at the park’s Fire Tower on Saturday.

    “We invite everyone to come out and take advantage of a fee-free day this Saturday and enjoy Bandelier before the busy summer season sets in,” said Joanie Budzileni, who is the chief of interpretation and visitor services for the park.

    The fee-free day is in conjunction with Earth Day 2018.

    The art exhibit is entitled “The Edge Effect: re-Imagining the East Jemez Landscape.” It is being shown in collaboration with the East Jemez Landscape Futures Project.

    Installation of the exhibit is by Kathleen Brennan and Shawn Skabelund. It opens Saturday and closes May 6 and can be seen each day from 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

    Visitors will be able to record their stories of changes in the East Jemez for the oral history archives.

    Kimberly DeVall, who is the chief of interpretation and education at Valles Caldera National Preserve, said the preserve is currently fee free and will be open to the public, but there are no special Earth Day activities planned at the preserve.

  • Assets in Action: Important to talk to your children about underage drinking

    One of the many reasons we try to promote the 40 Developmental Assets® is that as youth grow, they can gain the skills and traits that help them make good choices.

    April is underage drinking prevention month. Way back in October, many students planted bulbs in community gardens, which grow and bloom during this month. The nation-wide effort is part of a strategy to remind children to make good choices throughout their lives.

    My husband, along with Lonnie Mehlin, created a pledge garden at the direction of then Chamisa Principal, Kate Thomas that first bloomed in 2008. Every year, with the help of volunteers and Mother Nature, many students from the past, can see the current flowers bloom and are reminded to make good choices, respect their bodies and that it is their choice.

    I find one of the most important things we can do is talk to your children and talk to them often. You’ll see many opportunities, where a simple comment or question may lead to a good talk. If you have been talking about important things along the way, it makes hard conversations easier.

    On April 21, Power Talk 21 will take place online as a way to help parents with having the big talk. The MADD Facebook page is dedicated to it, for an easy way to remember to research the information.

  • Births: Rylan David Looney

    Steven and Kim Looney of White Rock announce the birth of their son, Rylan David Looney. Rylan arrived at 3:59 p.m. on Thursday, April 5, 2018, at Los Alamos Medical Center.

    Rylan weighed 7 pounds, 12 ounces and measured 21 inches in length. He is the Looneys’ first child.

    Maternal grandparents are Dale and Gina Goralczyk.

    Paternal grandparents are Richard and Martha Looney.

  • Dede Feldman to speak at Voices of LA

    Former state senator, journalist and professor of political sciences Dede Feldman will be the guest speaker at this month’s Voices of Los Alamos progressive advocacy meeting.

    Feldman’s presentation will be based on her new book, “Another Way Forward,” which highlights the work of non-profits, social enterprises and grassroots organizations traveling another route to economic development and healthy communities.

    This free event will be from 6:30–7:30 p.m. at the Unitarian Church, 1738 N. Sage Loop, on Monday.

  • Cathedral of St. John with visiting Cathedral Choir to perform in LA April 22

    The 50-strong choir of the Cathedral of St John, Albuquerque, directed by Maxine Thévenot, with Edmund Connolly, organ, will visit Trinity on the Hill Episcopal Church, Los Alamos, on Sunday.

    The group will sing a service of Choral Evensong at 5 p.m. with the resident Evensong Choir and singers from other parts of northern New Mexico.

    The Cathedral Choir has toured the U.S. and the U.K., and has made several critically acclaimed recordings.

    The service, which uses the language of the 1662 prayer book, will last about 45 minutes, and feature music by Dr Thévenot, the 20th century New York composer Harold Friedell and British composers Charles Wood, Barry Rose and Noel Rawsthorne.

    There will also be congregational hymns and readings from the King James Bible. The service will be followed by a reception in Kelly Hall.

    The Los Alamos community is invited to join members of St. John’s Cathedral Choir and the Trinity on the Hill congregation for this special, musical event Sunday. For more information, call the TOTH office at 662-5107.

  • Community Calendar 4-18-18

    TODAY
    The public is invited to a potluck dinner to learn about Polaris Charter School from 5:30-8 p.m. at Family Strengths Network, 3540 Orange St. Members of the Polaris team will be available to talk about the school and answer questions. Bring a dish to share! Polaris will engage students, grade sixth-eighth, in the community, environment, history and culture of northern New Mexico through personalized, hands-on learning experiences that strengthen and support student well-being and intellectual growth.
    THURSDAY
    Chamber Business Breakfast from 7:30-9 a.m. at UNM-LA Building 2, Room 230. Chief Building Official Michael Arellano and Fire Marshall Jeff Wetteland of Los Alamos County will discuss the county’s commercial code enforcement and building permits/licenses with a focus on how this may affect the business community. Register in advance only!
    FRIDAY
    Gentle Walk at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center.
A gentle walk during which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Admission: Free.
    SATURDAY
    Earth Day Festival
from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Nature Center. Join us to celebrate Earth Day at the Los Alamos Nature Center, where there will be engaging activities, fun entertainment, and delicious food. Free.

  • Internet purchases challenge local budgets

    BY HOLLY BRADSHAW-EAKES
    Finance New Mexico

    As budget-conscious consumers increasingly opt for the convenience and economy of online shopping, states like New Mexico are ramping up pressure on internet-based retailers to collect and remit the taxes states need to provide essential services.

    While Amazon.com recently agreed to charge New Mexico consumers the state portion of the gross receipts tax (GRT), more change is needed to erase what states see as an unfair advantage for online retailers over local merchants who are required to collect and remit the entire combination of state and local taxes.

    New Mexico consumers, for example, can still avoid paying the state GRT when buying from a third-party vendor on the Amazon marketplace platform. And they don’t pay local option taxes that communities levy to subsidize local needs. For example, a Santa Fean who buys a book from Amazon pays 5.125 percent of the purchase price to cover state taxes, but she won’t be assessed the additional 3.3125 percent in local taxes to support city services.

    Local governments have few options to correct this imbalance, but states are taking action.

    Fighting for fairness

  • What you didn’t want to know about the Land Grant Permanent Fund

    We’ve all heard the arguments about early childhood education as the solution to pull New Mexico out of poverty. The state’s Land Grant Permanent Fund is targeted as a way to pay for it.

    Not so fast. The devil is in the details. 

    What follows is the kind of policy wonkish recitation that sends people tiptoeing out of the room. This explanation comes from former State Land Commissioner Ray Powell, who knows because he’s watched lawmakers and others sneak out the back door.

    The Permanent Fund is not one big pot of money that we can dip into any way we choose. The money is all spoken for. Changing the distribution requires a state constitutional amendment and approval by Congress.

    Our state trust lands were established with a checkerboard pattern, six squares by six, a total of 36 squares each representing a square mile. The pattern was applied all over the state. In each checkerboard, four squares – none touching each other -- were given to the state. 

    These tracts are scattered everywhere. On the Land Office map (on the website, look for LandStatus11x17) they appear as lots of tiny pale blue squares and larger clumps where tracts are consolidated.

    Each tract is earmarked for a specific beneficiary. And so is the revenue from that tract.

  • Police arrest a Los Alamos man on drug charges

    Police investigating activity at a vacant lot off Trinity Drive arrested an 18-year-old Los Alamos man April 9 on two counts of contributing to the delinquency of a minor, possession of a controlled substance (cocaine), possession of marijuana and use or possession of drug paraphernalia.

    At the scene, Los Alamos Police Officer Gabriel Nieto observed three passengers in the vehicle.

    Isaiah Aylmer was in one of the rear passenger seats of the vehicle.

    “Due to the hidden location they are at and previous graffiti issues in the area, I asked them for identification,” said Nieto in his report.

    Nieto then asked who owned a black bag and two backpacks inside the vehicle. Isaiah Aylmer reportedly at first denied ownership of any of the items, but later confirmed that a backpack containing the illegal substances was his, according to police reports.

    He allegedly told Nieto that when they saw him, the other two passengers in his vehicle allegedly passed Aylmer the substances and was told to hide them, according to the report.

    Aylmer was released on his own recognizance and is due to appear in court for a preliminary hearing April 27.

  • Española man arrested on suspicion of drug possession

    Police reportedly found heroin on a suspect while he was being checked into the Los Alamos County Detention Center April 9.

    The suspect, Brandyn Valdez, 22, of Española was arrested on suspicion of possession of a controlled substance, tampering with evidence, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a controlled substance (heroin) and driving with a suspended or revoked license.

    Police first came in contact with Valdez when a call came in regarding a vehicle driving in and out of a marked lane on East Jemez Road as he was driving toward White Rock.

    Police reportedly pulled Valdez’s car over. Valdez was driving a white pickup truck. Police and Valdez pulled into a parking lot off of Sherwood Boulevard, where police arrested Valdez on suspicion of driving with a suspended license, a charge he was previously cited for earlier in the month.

    While being booked into the Los Alamos County Detention Center, police allegedly discovered suboxone, heroin, and drug paraphernalia hidden on his person that Valdez allegedly didn’t tell the officer who arrested him.

    A preliminary hearing for Valdez’s case is set for May 11 in Los Alamos Magistrate Court.