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Today's News

  • McMillan talks housing, LANL’s future, community

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Charles McMillan gave two similar yet different talks in Los Alamos last month, each one focusing on housing and jobs.

    At Los Alamos County Council’s Aug. 29 meeting, McMillan emphasized the lab’s employment strategies and how that figures into the council’s plans to create more housing opportunities.

    “We continue to bring new talent to the laboratory. As what  many organizations are experiencing today, we’re seeing retirements from the baby boom generation and, recognizing that was the case several years ago, we started working with the laboratory statisticians in the HR (human resources) organization, developing staffing plans that would address the future needs of the laboratory workforce, taking into account the projected retirements,” McMillan said. “Those projections are running very close to what we’ve expected and the consequences of that is that we hired over a thousand people last year at the laboratory, and this year, we are on track to hire almost another thousand.”

    McMillan said he and his staff were able to accomplish this goal with a five-year plan that is reviewed yearly. He also gave county council a breakdown of where the workforce lives.

  • Accident on Diamond Drive Tuesday causes traffic delays

    Traffic was delayed Tuesday about 5 p.m. following a two-car accident on Diamond Drive.

    A blue BMW sedan driven by a 17-year-old girl was headed northbound on Diamond Drive about 5 p.m. Tuesday when her car collided with red Volkswagen SUV driven by a 72-year-old woman who was driving south on Diamond Drive. The 72-year-old woman was attempting to make a left turn onto Orange Street.

    No injuries were reported, no citations were issued at the scene, according to Los Alamos Police.

  • New Mexico attorney general fights call to serve as witness

    SANTA FE (AP) — State prosecutors are asking a court to reject an unusual effort to call New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas as a witness at a high-profile corruption trial being prosecuted by his office.

    Balderas is being listed as a potential witness as an October trial date approaches for former Sen. Phil Griego on allegations that he used his position as a state senator to profit from the 2014 sale of a state-owned building in downtown Santa Fe without proper disclosure.

    Balderas spokesman James Hallinan on Monday described the maneuver as a "last ditch effort by Phil Griego's defense attorney to delay the trial."

    Defense attorney Thomas Clark is listing Balderas as a trail witness and highlighting a $1,500 campaign contribution by Griego to the attorney general's 2014 campaign.
     

  • Twenty-year drift abandons generations

     Children mostly don’t get headlines, except when something really bad happens. Otherwise they remain in the background, doing what they are supposed to do, being children. 

    But adverse things happen; “adverse childhood experiences” is the umbrella phrase. And what we get in New Mexico, where we’ve been drifting for 20 years or more, is a generation or two or three of children who have become adults without becoming part of the middle class bourgeois social fabric that is supposed to be what our American society is about. These now-adult children are training their life partners and children in more of the same taking of actions that are morally sanitized with the description “bad choices.”

    All sorts of statistics exist about this situation; those numbers will await another column. All sorts of charities exist, too, so many as to generate the hunch that raising the money to stay in business dilutes the work.

  • Pajarito Mountain ready for Ullr Fest

    Pajarito Mountain will host its annual Ullr Fest this weekend, signaling the official end to the summer season and beginning the preparations for ski season. 

    Ullr Fest, which was described by Pajarito employee Jeffrey Bold as “big and boisterous,” is the mountain’s fall festival, which is aimed at “appeasing the mythological snow gods,” and bringing about a successful ski season. 

    In Norse mythology, Ullr is the winter god. He is regarded as the Patron Saint of skiers, and it is believed that skiers must please him to bring about a successful season.

    “The real goal of this event is to hopefully bring the snow for the upcoming season,” Bold said. 

    The event kicks off on Saturday, with a guided 10-mile hike from Los Alamos to Pajarito Mountain led by the Pajarito Environmental Education Center and the Los Alamos Mountaineers set to begin at 7:45 a.m. To register for the free hike, go to peecnature.org or call 662-0460. 

    The ski lifts will begin running at 9 a.m. on both Saturday and Sunday, and will run until 3 p.m. 

    The cost of a ski lift ticket for the event is $25. 

    There will be numerous events taking place all day, including a downhill mountain bike race and a poker run race.

  • Walt Gonske exhibit at Taos Art Museum

    “The West has passed – more’s the pity. In another 25 years the old-time westerner will have gone too – gone with the buffalo and the antelope. I’m going to hand down to posterity a bit of the unadulterated real thing, if it’s the last thing I do – and I’m going to do it muy pronto.”

     

    – W. Herbert “Buck” Dunton

     

    Enjoy a close look at the work of an artist whose art has embodied the Southwest for four decades. Taos Art Museum at Fechin House will present a retrospective exhibition of the artwork of painter Walt Gonske, to open at the beginning of the Taos Fall Arts Festival on Saturday.

    An acknowledged master of Southwestern art, with more than four decades of exploring every aspect of the mountain desert landscapes of northern New Mexico, the painter Walt Gonske actually started out in life on the East Coast, and envisioned a career in illustration. He has defied expectations ever since, and flourished both in what he chose to do and where he chose to live. This exhibition is a celebration of those choices.

  • Contestants wanted for 2018 Eastern NM State Fair Queen Contest

    The Eastern New Mexico State Fair Queen Contest is open to young ladies, 16-24, from the 33 New Mexico counties. 

    Participants will compete in personal interview, speech, modeling, impromptu questions and horsemanship categories for various prizes.

    Scholarships, gifts and prizes are awarded to all contestants.  The 2017-2018 ENMSF Queen will receive a perpetual Crown, buckle, saddle and $1,000 Scholarship.

    This year, the contest is will be a one-day event on Oct. 1 in Roswell. Entry fees are $150 and entry packets are due no later than Sept. 27.

     

    More information is available online at enmsf.com

  • Village of Galisteo to celebrate 30th Anniversary Studio Tour

     A short drive from Santa Fe in the magnificent Galisteo Basin, the historic village of Galisteo will celebrate its 30th Annual Studio Tour from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Oct. 14-15. 

    Over 25 artists and craftsmen will open their studios to share photography, painting, ceramic art, jewelry, handmade knives, traditional straw inlay, sculpture and weaving. 

    For more detailed information, directions, and artists’ pages, go to galisteostudiotour.org or call 505-466-3541.   

  • PEEC’s Forest Explorers program to continue

    The Pajarito Environmental Education Center’s popular summer program for 5 to 8 year olds will return this fall. Forest Explorers, a hike-and-play club, will take children on hikes from 1-3 p.m. every other Wednesday from Oct. 4 through Dec. 13 and give kids ample time for child-directed play in nature.Forest Explorers is a drop-off program that will meet at the Los Alamos Nature Center every other Wednesday at 1 p.m. for a total of six outings this fall. The hikes will take kids into the nearby canyon where kids will be able to build forts, make seasonal observations, and learn to identify different plants and animals. The Forest Explorers class is taught by educator Denise Matthews and will allow children to have fun outside while working cooperatively, building gross motor skills, and learning more about the local ecology

    Matthews leads the Nature Playtimes program for PEEC and also serves as an instructor for the year-round Pebble Pups club, school field trips, and classroom visits. She has taught science in the classroom and as an environmental educator for the past 12 years. Matthews is passionate about providing kids the opportunity to connect with the local environment through child-directed outdoor exploration and inquiry.

  • Elevate vacations to new levels with a heli-hiking adventure

    BY DEBBIE STONE

     

    Special to the Monitor

    He seemed like such a nice guy. That was the group’s initial impression of our hiking guide, Paul – a mellow, wry humored Canuck. 

    Paul appeared calm and assuring as he gathered us around to talk about our first hike of the day. Moments before, the helicopter had gently set us down in front of Howser Towers, an impressive set of peaks in the Bugaboos, a range within the Columbia Mountains of British Columbia. 

    The name “Bugaboo” actually means a hoax in Old English. Story has it that when folks came up here looking for gold, they found only pyrite, or fool’s gold, so they aptly called the area the Bugaboos and the name stuck.