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Today's News

  • Santa Fe Sheriff still investigating fatal crash

    Investigators are looking for any witnesses to the driving behavior of Elias Arellano, 18, who was driving a Chrysler Sebring convertible on Friday afternoon prior to a fatal wreck on U.S. 84/285.
    Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office investigators said they would like to hear from anyone who might have witnessed his driving behavior. Investigators said he lost control of the vehicle around 3 p.m. on Friday and caused the death of a 72-year-old Espanola woman, Lucy Fresques.
    Arellano and a juvenile who was a passenger in his vehicle were ejected from the convertible and weren’t wearing seat belts, according to Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office investigators.
    Fresques was driving a southbound Acura sports utility vehicle that was struck head-on by the convertible driven Arellano, according to the Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office.
    Also injured was Fresques’ husband, Robert, 74.
    Arellano’s vehicle had been northbound when it crossed into the southbound traffic, near Buffalo Thunder Resort.
    That section of highway lacks barriers between northbound and southbound lanes.
    He was taken by ambulance to the University of New Mexico Hospital.
    The investigators said they believe Arellano lost control of his vehicle.

  • NNSA finishes W80-1 alteration

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) has completed the First Production Unit (FPU) of the W80-1 Alteration (Alt) 369. This accomplishment is an important step toward maintaining nuclear capabilities that will help deter attacks on the United States and its allies.
    “The dedicated team at Pantex went above and beyond to complete this milestone before fiscal year 2017 came to a close,” said Brig. Gen. Michael Lutton, NNSA’s principal assistant deputy administrator for military application. “NNSA can now successfully kick off fiscal year 2018 by entering full production for the W80-1 Alt 369. Such modernization efforts are key to maintaining the safety, security, and effectiveness of the nation’s nuclear weapons stockpile.”
    The W80-1, a warhead carried by the air-launched cruise missile, was first introduced to the stockpile in 1982. An alteration is a change to a component that does not alter the weapon’s operational capability.
    The Alt 369 replaces Limited Life Components in the warhead.

  • Science standards debate fills S.F. hall to capacity

    SANTA FE – Hundreds appeared Monday in Santa Fe for the single public hearing scheduled to comment on controversial science standards proposed by the state’s Public Education Department.
    Throughout the morning, no one spoke in favor of PED’s proposal, many saying the department’s rewritten version of the national Next Generation Science Standards, known as Next Gen, were politically motivated.
    The hearing was overseen by Kimberly Ulibarri, a PED hearing officer. Monday was the last day to submit comments.
    Two Los Alamos schools officials, Superintendent Kurt Steinhaus and board member Andrea Cunningham, had signed up to speak, but due to a lengthy interruption from a false fire alarm and problems managing the hearing’s sign-in sheets, the two didn’t speak. A second board member was called on to speak.
    Next Gen science standards were developed in 2013 by a consortium of 26 states, including people in New Mexico, and other organizations, such as National Science Teachers Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the National Research Council.
    Changes made at PED include replacing references to climate change with “temperature fluctuations,” removes mention of the earth’s age as 4.8 billion years, and tweaks instruction on evolution.

  • County hires new airport manager

    The county has hired Cameron Humphres to be Los Alamos Airport’s new manager, county officials announced Tuesday afternoon.

    Humphres, who previously who spent 19 months as a manager for Santa Fe Municipal Airport, is very familiar with Los Alamos. His grandfather lived in Los Alamos and built an airplane here.

    “I spent the most impressionable years of my life at the airport with him,” Humphres said in a written statement.  “Those experiences would become the catalyst for a career in airport management and military service.”

    Humphres will begin his new job Nov. 6. Before working in Santa Fe, Humphres worked for eight years as executive director of the Rapid City Regional Airport in South Dakota. Humphres also holds a commercial pilot’s license with multi-engine and instrument ratings.

    Humphres also worked as a B-1 bomber test pilot and as an A-10 mechanic., and has experience as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Air Force. Humphres has accreditation from the American Association of Airport Executives and he also has a master’s degree in aviation business administration.

    Humphres will be replacing Los Alamos Airport Manager David Ploeger, who retired earlier this month.

  • Science standards meeting fills state hearing room

    Hundreds appeared Monday in Santa Fe for the single public hearing scheduled to comment on controversial science standards proposed by the state’s Public Education Department.

    Throughout the morning, no one spoke in favor of PED’s proposal, many saying the department’s rewritten version of the national Next Generation Science Standards, known as Next Gen, were politically motivated.

    The hearing was overseen by Kimberly Ulibarri, a PED hearing officer. Monday was the last day to submit comments.

    Two Los Alamos schools officials, Superintendent Kurt Steinhaus and board member Andrea Cunningham, had signed up to speak, but due to a lengthy interruption from a false fire alarm and problems managing the hearing’s sign-in sheets, the two didn’t speak. A second board member was called on to speak.

    Next Gen science standards were developed in 2013 by a consortium of 26 states, including people in New Mexico, and other organizations, such as National Science Teachers Association, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the National Research Council.

    Changes made at PED include replacing references to climate change with “temperature fluctuations,” removes mention of the earth’s age as 4.8 billion years, and tweaks instruction on evolution.

  • Register now for YMCA youth basketball program

    YMCA Youth Basketball program registration is open until Oct 24.

    The Family YMCA’s Youth Basketball program is a skills developmental program for youth in grades 1-6 that would like to learn the fundamentals of basketball, team participation and to play a few games.

    Registration for this program is open through Oct. 24. Players will be placed on teams based on their local school and will meet twice a week for practice Nov. 6–Feb. 2.

    Games are on Saturdays Dec. 9–Feb. 3. Teams for grades 1-2 are co-ed, with boys and girls spilt for grades 3-4 and grades 5-6.

    Volunteer coaches, assistant coaches and team parents are needed. The YMCA is also looking for referees for the Saturday games. This is a paid position and applications will be accepted at The YMCA until Nov. 15.

    Price for the basketball season is $120 / $90 for Y Members. This includes team jerseys, gym rentals, practice gear and refs for the games.

  • LAHS golf continues strong start

    The Los Alamos High School golf teams headed to Albuquerque this week, looking to build momentum after strong performances in Grants at their previous competition.

    Both teams walked away with positives, as the boys won the tournament, and the girls had two competitors earn state qualifying scores.

    This was the best event of the season so far for the boys golf team, which claimed the team title and had the top two individual competitors at the Valley and Cibola Invitational, held at the Ladera Golf Course.

    Henry Poston was the indivudal leader in the clubhouse, shooting a 73, while his teammate Jacob Benelli finished right behind him with a score of 74.

    The scores for LAHS’ other golfers were highly impressive, as Davis Johnson finished with a score of 77, as did Logan Bishop. Sean Rau finished right behind them with a score of 78, while Brandan Duran finished with an 81.

    The boys won the tournament quite easily, finishing with an overall score of 301. Second-place finisher La Cueva High School finished 21 strokes back with a score of 322, and third-place Albuquerque Academy finished with a score of 336.

  • Atomic City Update: Cross country teams deserve fan support at only home meet

    Playing a low-profile sport isn’t always the easiest thing to do in high school. Unless you’re playing football, soccer, basketball or baseball, you do all the hard work, put in all the long hours, yet you receive little credit or accolades.

    I know firsthand how difficult that can be. As a swimmer in high school, few people outside of the swim parents ever attended the meets, and people around school didn’t realize how big of a deal it was for us to beat a rival school. It just wasn’t at the top of mind like football games were.

    It is also hard for sports that don’t compete in town very often. That’s why I think it’s important for everyone to support the Los Alamos High School cross country teams when they compete at the Los Alamos County Golf Course next weekend.

    This is the team’s only home meet of the season, and it is the last regular season meet before the team heads to the district competition.

    Throughout the fall, the community has had the opportunity to watch athletes compete in football, soccer and volleyball in town, and now the cross country athletes deserve the same type of support.

  • Supreme Court backs push to remove Ten Commandments monument

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday sided with a lower court that ordered a New Mexico city to remove a Ten Commandments monument from the lawn outside City Hall.

    Civil liberties advocates behind the case called the decision involving the city of Bloomfield a victory for the separation of church and state.

    ACLU of New Mexico Executive Director Peter Simonson said it sends a "strong message that the government should not be in the business of picking and choosing which sets of religious beliefs enjoy special favor in the community."

    However, David Cortman, a senior counsel and vice president of U.S. litigation with Alliance Defending Freedom, said the outcome did nothing to resolve confusion in lower courts involving such monuments.

    "Americans shouldn't be forced to censor religion's role in history simply to appease someone who is offended by it or who has a political agenda to remove all traces of religion from the public square," said Cortman, whose group represented the city of Bloomfield.

    The decision came after attorneys for the city argued that the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals had ignored previous rulings by the Supreme Court that simply being offended by such a monument did not give someone a legal basis to challenge the monument.

  • New Mexico education secretary defends science overhaul

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico's public education secretary is defending new proposed science standards that have been widely criticized for deleting or omitting references to global warming, evolution and the age of the earth.

    State education official are holding their one and only public hearing Monday to gather comments on the proposed standards.

    In a public message published Sunday, Public Education Secretary Christopher Ruszkowski says the new standards will give teachers and families flexibility and local control around science materials, curriculum and content. He did not specifically address how the standards address the teaching of evolution and climate change.

    Top scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory, science education associations and major New Mexico school districts are asking the state to adopt unedited standards developed by a consortium on states.