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Today's News

  • Watching the governor’s vetoes makes me wonder

    When Bill Richardson started flirting with a plan to run for president, some of his actions as governor looked suspiciously as if he were using New Mexico to advance his political ambitions.
    It’s hard to avoid the same suspicion about Gov. Susana Martinez. She’s taken a number of actions over her two terms that have seemed to be more about piling up sound bites for somebody else’s policy checklist than what’s best for the state.
    Now she’s officially a lame duck. It may be hard for her to run for any higher office, not because of any lack of competency or accomplishments but because of the infamous Christmas party incident of 2015. (If you don’t remember this, please Google “Susana Martinez pizza.”)
    But she still could have political ambitions in a less obvious direction. We can watch to see how this plays out in the bills she chooses to sign or veto.
    It’s widely understood that New Mexico’s tax system could use a major overhaul. In order to do that, policymakers must be able to engage in give-and-take, which means some taxes may go down and others may go up. Gov. Martinez’s inflexibility on raising any taxes has looked like she wants to preserve her anti-tax bragging rights, not like she wants to solve the problem.

  • Irish dance fundraiser set for Saturday

    Belisama Irish Dance School will host a fundraiser from 2-4 p.m. Saturday at the Unitarian Church of Los Alamos, 1738 North Sage St., Los Alamos.
    The lively afternoon will include ceili dancing (Irish social dance), live music, a short Irish dance demonstration and refreshments to help fund the Belisama Irish Dance Company’s future performances and new costumes. A Girl Scout Fun Patch will be offered for those Girl Scouts joining the fun.
    Special guests Billy Turney and Lucinda Sydow of Chili Line Accordions will provide traditional tunes in a fun environment for the whole family.
    Tickets are $10 for children, $15 for adults, and $50 for families with four or more members (plus a young guest). Ages 4 and under are free. Call 795-8011 for tickets or stop by CB Fox in Los Alamos.

  • Drawing and painting class March 4-5

     Artist and instructor Lisa Coddington will teach a two-day workshop on drawing and watercolor using botanical and natural subjects at the Los Alamos Nature Center March 4 and 5.
    This class, made possible by Pajarito Environmental Education Center, is appropriate for all skill levels to refine skills and enjoy the creative process.
    The workshop will run from 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. March 4, and 1-4 p.m. March 5.
    Register to learn techniques for creating realistic, still life, nature-inspired art.
    Participants will explore pencil and watercolor techniques that portray plants and animals in this hands-on workshop. With easy-to-understand demonstrations and master artist examples, Codedington will work to reinforce confidence in creating dimensional Autumn-themed subjects.
    A minimum of eight students are required for the class, so those interested in the workshop are encouraged to register on the PEEC website by March 1. Otherwise, the class will be canceled if there is not enough interest.
    Artist-instructor Coddington earned her master of art degree at Syracuse in illustration. She has illustrated a children’s book and has received commissions by regional and national firms for her artwork and art instruction. Her whimsical characters have been licensed for ornaments and are also featured on greeting cards.

  • Arts and Entertainment Calendar 2-22-17

    Art exhibits
    The National Museum of Nuclear Science and History, 601 Eubank SE in Albuquerque, will host “Critical Assembly, the Secrets of Los Alamos 1944: An Installation by American Sculptor Jim Sanborn,” through Oct. 8. This special exhibit, created by world renowned sculptor Jim Sanborn – best known for creating the encrypted “Kryptos” sculpture at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia – invites visitors to explore and study the recreations of the super secret experiments from the Manhattan Project’s atomic bomb program. The museum is open from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m., 361 days a year. For information, visit nuclearmuseum.org, or call 505-245-2137.

    “Oblique Views: Archaeology, Photography and Time.” Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, 710 Camino Lejo, Santa Fe. Photographer Adriel Heisey re-photographed some of southwest’s most significant archeological sites that Charles Lindbergh and his wife, Anne, photographed in 1929. Exhibit runs through May.

  • Brave New Brass to play at Fuller Lodge

    The community is invited to enjoy a lunchtime performance by Brave New Brass during the Brown Bag Lunch March 1 at Fuller Lodge.
    Brave New Brass is a brass ensemble formed in Los Alamos, based on previous brass quintets organized by Dave and Deniece Korzekwa.
    The members of Brave New Brass have a broad interest in the music available for small brass ensembles of various combinations, and have been performing as a group in Los Alamos since 2012.
    Members of the group are all local Los Alamos musicians, with Elizabeth Hunke (French horn), Deniece Korzekwa (tuba), Dave Korzekwa (trumpet), Mandy Marksteiner (trumpet) and Bruce Warren (trombone). \As an applied mathematician at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Hunke develops and maintains the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model, CICE, which is used in numerous climate-modeling centers around the world. In her spare time she plays horn with several Los Alamos ensembles, and she is active in the Ninety-Nines, an international organization of women pilots that provides scholarship opportunities for women and aviation education in the community.

  • Spellbound in the magical Yukon

    By Debbie Stone

    Special to the Monitor

  • Biologists find cave life that may be 50,000 years old

    BOSTON (AP) — In a Mexican cave system so beautiful and hot that it is called both Fairyland and hell, scientists have discovered life trapped in crystals that could be 50,000 years old.
    The bizarre and ancient microbes were found dormant in caves in Naica, Mexico, and were able to exist by living on minerals such as iron and manganese, said Penelope Boston, head of NASA’s Astrobiology Institute. .
    “It’s super life,” said Boston, who presented the discovery Friday at the American Association for the Advancement of Science conference in Boston.
    If confirmed, the find is yet another example of how microbes can survive in extremely punishing conditions on Earth.
    Though it was presented at a science conference and was the result of nine years of work, the findings haven’t yet been published in a scientific journal and haven’t been peer reviewed. Boston planned more genetic tests for the microbes she revived both in the lab and on site.
    The life forms – 40 different strains of microbes and even some viruses – are so weird that their nearest relatives are still 10 percent different genetically. That makes their closest relative still pretty far away, about as far away as humans are from mushrooms, Boston said.

  • ‘The Other Place’ to open Friday

    Los Alamos Little Theatre tackles a play about life, loss, and nothing is as it seems with its newest play, “The Other Place.”
    The drama opens Friday and centers on Juliana Smithton, a successful neurologist who is on the brink of a breakthrough in her field, but the rest of her life is unraveling. Her husband has filed for divorce, her daughter has eloped with a much older man and her own health is in jeopardy.
    Piece by piece, a mystery unfolds as fact blurs with fiction, past collides with present, and the elusive truth about Smithton boils to the surface.
    Gwen Lewis, director, was drawn to this play because “Sharr White did a beautiful, tasteful job writing about a very difficult situation. The characters of Juliana and Ian go from professionals to a place that is new and challenging for both of them. Both explore feelings of helplessness, which the audience will be able to relate to,” she said.
    Just as Smithton’s research leads to a potential breakthrough, events take a disorienting turn.
    During a lecture to colleagues at an exclusive beach resort, she glimpses an enigmatic young woman in a yellow bikini amidst the crowd of business suits. But in this brilliantly crafted work, nothing is as it seems.

  • LA Community Winds presents Mussorgsky Masterpiece

    The Los Alamos Community Winds will present its mid-Winter concert at 7 p.m. Saturday at White Rock Baptist Church.
    The concert will feature marches, original music for concert band, as well as music from film and television.
    The featured work on the program is Modeste Mussorgsky’s “Pictures at an Exhibition.”
    Written in honor of his artist friend, Victor Hartmann,“Pictures at an Exhibition” takes the listener on a stroll amongst paintings and sketches depicting the Russian people, legends, and myths. Each movement is separated by a “promenade” literally intended to be heard while walking from one gallery to the next. Sadly, only a few of the original Hartmann paintings exist.
    Originally written for piano, the work has achieved much greater fame and recognition in the concert hall due to its being transcribed for orchestra in 1922 by Maurice Ravel (at the request of famed conductor Serge Koussevitzky.) Ravel was able to exploit more fully the coloristic possibilities the work contained despite the “monochromatic” quality of the original.
    While Ravel’s orchestration was not the first created for orchestra, it has certainly become the most famous.

  • Prep boys basketball: Toppers crash out of district tourney

    The Los Alamos boys basketball team fell in the second round of the District 2-5A tournament to Del Norte Tuesday night in Albuquerque.

    Del Norte's 53-40 win sends the Knights to the district tournament semifinals, where they'll face Española Valley on Thursday in Española. The loss moves Los Alamos to 13-14 overall, which will likely be enough to send the Hilltoppers to the state tournament.

    Seeding selections for the state tournament will be made Sunday.