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Today's News

  • For Everyone To See

    Los Alamos High School. hosted its annual student art show Thursday at the Duane Smith Auditorium. More than 100 pieces of art were on display in several different mediums, including photography, drawing and sculpture.

  • Beer co-op will pop open May 29

    Bathtub Row Brewing, the new brewing cooperative, will open its doors May 29 at Central Park Square.
    The co-op, which is reportedly only the fourth such endeavor in the country, will have a ribbon-cutting ceremony at noon May 29.
    Along with the ribbon-cutting, the grand opening will include music, food and the release of several new beers.
    The festivities are scheduled to continue through May 30 starting at 3 p.m. Co-op members said that the public is invited to attend next weekend’s events.
    According to a press release from the co-op, members will “aim to educate the public about the art and science of brewing,” as well as run a business-friendly and environmentally-friendly establishment.

  • Gladiators score 86 in loss

    As the Duke City Gladiators traveled to Amarillo last Saturday night, it’s only fitting the game turned into an old-fashioned western shootout.
    With both offenses firing on all cylinders, every defensive stop made a difference. But when it came down to it, the Amarillo Venom (6-3 Champions Indoor Football) defeated the Duke City Gladiators (3-3 CIF) in an 89-86 four-overtime indoor football clash.
    It was a back-and-forth affair for most of the game as neither team led by much more than a touchdown.
    Coupled by a trio of field goal misses from Amarillo’s Jacob Fetzon, Duke City extended their lead to as much as 60-49 with 11:34 remaining in the fourth quarter. But the Venom went on a 14-3 run to end the quarter, which sent the game to overtime.
    Gladiators’ quarterback Kasey Peters, wide receiver Dexter Manley, and running back Seth Smith each scored their own touchdowns in extra time. But similar to regulation, the Venom answered back to the Gladiator’s scores and the wild, wild West matchup was finally decided in the fourth overtime.
    Peters finished 31-for-45 in passing attempts with 390 passing yards, and eight touchdowns.
    Manley added 12 receptions, 126 yards and two touchdowns. Wide receiver Roland Bruno ended with 11 receptions, 122 yards and two touchdowns.

  • Quick wins flight at Sandia

    Three golfers from Los Alamos placed well at the Northern New Mexico Senior Men’s Golf Association tournament held at the Sandia Golf Course May 12.
    Bob Quick won the first flight with a gross score of 82.
    In the second flight, Larry Hults shot a 73 net score to take second in the net division.
    Quinn Cremer, meanwhile, shot a 76 net score to finish third in the fourth flight’s net division.
    The next day, the association hosted another tournament at UNM’s Championship Golf Course.
    Hults shot a 69 net score to finish second in the second flight’s net division.
    Playing in the same division as Hults, Ron Krantz shot a 71 net score to finish third.
    Maguin Urioste won the third flight. Urioste shot a 90 gross to finish first.
    Cremer shot a 68 net score to take third in the fourth flight.
     

  • Begrudgingly following a mysterious bigfoot

    After either being cooped up inside or getting rained on outside, it was nice to finally get out for a pedal last week on a dry day. I watched the sun shine for most of the day, then loaded up my bike and headed over to Kwage Mesa for a few sunset laps.
    Someone’s cabin fever, however, had apparently boiled over before mine did and they hit the trail immediately after the rain subsided. There were deep footprints in the dirt singletrack, turning what I was hoping to be a flowy ride on some tacky dirt into a choppy and bumpy experience.
    I understand their mindset. Sometimes you just have to get out and it’s hard to know what condition a trail is in until you’re actually on it.
    But come on, after 50 feet it should have become apparent to this mysterious bigfoot that a paved surface would have been a better choice than slogging through the mud.
    But they went on anyway.
    Their shoes probably weighed 10 pounds by the time they finished the trail. And then they turned around and put another set of 3-inch deep tracks on the trail going the other way.
    I kept wondering what that person was thinking as I aimed my front tire at their footprints in an attempt to smooth the trail back out.
    Thinking about what they were thinking, however, completely ruined my first lap.

  • Today in history May 21
  • Banks fined for rigging

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Four global banks agreed Wednesday to pay more than $5 billion in penalties and plead guilty to rigging the world’s currency market, the first time in more than two decades that major players in the financial industry have admitted to criminal wrongdoing on such a scale.
    Traders at JPMorgan Chase, Citigroup, Barclays and the Royal Bank of Scotland conspired among themselves to fix exchange rates on U.S. dollars and euros, according to a resolution announced by the banks and the Justice Department. The currency traders, who called themselves “The Cartel,” allegedly shared customer orders and used that information to profit at their clients’ expense.
    The resolution is complex and involves multiple regulators in the U.S. and overseas.
    The four banks will pay a combined $2.5 billion in criminal penalties to the Justice Department for criminal manipulation of currency rates between 2007 and 2013. The Federal Reserve is slapping them with an additional $1.6 billion in fines.
    , as the banks’ chief regulator. Finally, Britain’s Barclays is paying an additional $1.3 billion to British and U.S. regulators for its role in the scheme.

  • Oldest tools found in Kenya

    NEW YORK (AP) — By taking a wrong turn in a dry riverbed in Kenya, scientists discovered a trove of stone tools far older than any ever found before. Nobody knows who made them — or why.
    At 3.3 million years old, they push back the record of stone tools by about 700,000 years. More significantly, they are half-a-million years older than any known trace of our own branch of the evolutionary tree.
    Scientists have long thought that sharp-edged stone tools were made only by members of our branch, whose members are designated “Homo,” like our own species, Homo sapiens. That idea has been questioned, and the new finding is a big boost to the argument that tool-making may have begun with smaller-brained forerunners instead.
    The discovery was reported by Sonia Harmand and Jason Lewis of Stony Brook University in New York and co-authors in a paper released Wednesday by the journal Nature. The find drew rave reviews from experts unconnected to the work.
    “It really absolutely moves the beginnings of human technology back into a much more distant past, and a much different kind of ancestor than we’ve been thinking of,” said anthropology professor Alison Brooks of George Washington University, who has examined some of the tools.

  • County to publish 'Cone Zone' again

    Los Alamos County will start publishing its Cone Zone updates again, according to officials.
    Residents and visitors are encouraged to check the Cone Zone on its webpage, losalamosnm.us. It runs in the summer months and is usually published through October.
    Cone Zone will also be published weekly in the Los Alamos Monitor.

  • A Big Slice of Pi

    Tazler Smith was celebrated for his accomplishments at Los Alamos Middle School. Smith memorized the first 113 digits of pi, the famous irrational number, represented on the poster behind him. Smith was heralded by the math department for his efforts.