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Today's News

  • Los Alamos County debuts a revamped website

    Los Alamos County debuted a revamped website today that it hopes will be more user-friendly.

    The website’s main feature is better communication through the use of interactive forms.

    County officials also said the website, at losalamosnm.us, features:

    • Better navigation tools,

    • Redesigned sub-sites for departments or services,

    • Improved search engine capabilities,

    • Easy access through home page “quick links” for the most popular links,

    • Enhanced photo and video hosting capability,

    • An integrated calendar of events with filter options,

    • Responsive design for viewing on smart phones and tablets.

    Also included in the site is software designed for easier public access to information on county boards and commissions. With the new software, the public will be able to review a board’s or a commission’s work plan and find out what the board does.

    The software also allows for those interested to check on vacancy statuses and reapplying for openings.

  • Police arrest 7 in drug bust operation

    Los Alamos Police, New Mexico State Police, U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agents and New Mexico Department of Corrections officials conducted an early morning drug bust in Los Alamos County Monday.

    DOC and DEA agents provided helicopter and K-9 support. The raids began at 7 a.m.

    LAPD Investigators recovered various amounts of methamphetamine, marijuana, cocaine, acid, mushrooms, prescription pills, drug paraphernalia and cash, according to an LAPD spokesman.

    “Future arrests linked to this operation are likely as this investigation continues,” LAPD Spokesman Commander Preston Ballew said.

    At least a few of the arrests occurred on San Ildefonso Road, according to witnesses who informed the Monitor.

    Nichole Marsh, 36, of Los Alamos was arrested and charged with one count of trafficking in a controlled substance and one count of possession of drug paraphernalia.

    Nicholas Conner, 35, of Los Alamos was arrested and charged with four counts of trafficking in a controlled substance.

    Amanda Osborne, 32, of Los Alamos was arrested and charged with two counts of trafficking in a controlled substance and one count of possession of drug paraphernalia.

    Anthony Knief, 32, of Los Alamos was arrested and charged with two counts of trafficking in a controlled substance.

  • Administrative state creeps along, always growing, always costing more

    The tax boys want additional information for your 2016 return, starting with your driver’s license number. If claiming certain credits for children, you must prove the kid lives with you, which, says my tax preparer, “gets really interesting if the kid is between zero and four.”
    Besides treading on our liberty, the requirements raise costs and provide another definition of what is being called “the administrative state.”
    In his March 5 Washington Post column, Robert Samuelson, one of my favorite analysts, quoting historian Steven Hayward from the current issue of the conservative Claremont Review of Books, wrote, “The administrative state represents a new and pervasive form of rule, and a perversion of constitutional self-government.” Samuelson concluded, “Like it or not, we do have an administrative state. It isn’t going away.”
    The simplest compliance with the new IRS rules will require about 20 minutes, estimates my tax preparer. There will be a modest charge for one new form. Otherwise the changes mean less sleep and no new clients this year, which means that the IRS has prevented the business from growing.
    Another favorite source, Megan McArdle of Bloomberg.com, in a Feb. 14 post linked to a long consideration of why everything costs more.

  • SWOT analysis helps businesses plan for growth

    By Finance New Mexico

  • News for Retirees March 19-25

    March 19-25
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations: by 10 a.m. for lunches.
    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY    
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    8:30 a.m.        Tax Preparation
    9:45 a.m.        Pilates
    10 a.m.         Senior Civic Discussion
    10 a.m.        LARSO Advisory Council
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Taco Salad
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango Dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom Dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:30 a.m.        Mac Users Group
    8:45 a.m.        Variety Training
    10 a.m.        Computer Users
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Salisbury steak
    1 p.m.        Bingo
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table Tennis

  • Shelter Report 3-22-17

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are noon – 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturday, and noon–3 p.m. Sunday.
    Be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating. Also check out Petfinder website for pictures of adoptable animals: petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.
    CATS
    Fernando—A young white and orange kitty who loves lounging the day away. This friendly male is currently in a larger kennel that has a “cat hammock” hanging inside – he loves lounging in it! He can be a bit picky about his feline friends, so he might need a little bit of time to warm up to new companions.
    Mr. Whiskers—A big tabby cat that is about 4 years old. Changes are a bit stressful for him, so he will likely need a little bit of time to adjust to his new home. He can be independent, but he’s also very sweet and likes to snuggle when he’s in the mood! He is okay with mellow cats, but other dominant males sometimes bother him.

  • Spaying, neutering pets may be best decision for pet’s health

    Although the idea of your pet having surgery can be scary, spaying and neutering is a common practice performed by veterinarians that can be beneficial to both you and your pet. In fact, the decision to spay or neuter your pet may be the best decision for your pet’s overall health.
    Dr. Mark Stickney, clinical associate professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained the benefits of spaying and neutering.
    “Spaying is the removal of reproductive organs in female dogs and cats,” Stickney said. “Spaying has a few general benefits, such as owners not having to tend to heat cycles or surprise litters of puppies or kittens. Benefits to neutering male pets—or removing the testicles – include decreased urine marking and aggression toward other males. In addition, neutered male pets are less likely to roam, a behavior that typically occurs when females of the same species are in heat. Roaming also puts your male pet at risk for getting lost, hurt, or injured by a car. Spaying and neutering also helps combat pet overpopulation.”

  • Melissa Savage to speak at library

    Melissa Savage, the author of “Rio: a Photographic Journey down the Old Rio Grande,” will speak at 7 p.m. at Mesa Public Library Thursday.
    Savage is a conservationist, geographer, professor emerita with UCLA, and director of the Four Corners Institute in Santa Fe. Her book is comprised of historical photographs of the Rio Grande, which are accompanied by essays written by people who are closely associated with the history of the river.
    UNM Press describes the book as: “The dynamic Río Grande has run through all the valley’s diverse cultures: Puebloan, Spanish, Mexican and Anglo. Photography arrived in the region at the beginning of the river’s great transformation by trade, industry and cultivation. In RIO, Melissa Savage has collected images that document the sweeping history of that transformation – from those of 19th-century expeditionary photographer W. H. Jackson to the work of the great 20th-century chronicler of the river, Laura Gilpin.”
    The Authors Speak program at Mesa Public Library provides a unique opportunity to meet prominent authors from the region. The readings and conversations take place on the fourth Thursday of each month, upstairs at Mesa Public Library. The Authors sell and sign books after the talks.

  • Vintage US nuclear test films published online

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — From the deserts of southern New Mexico and Nevada to islands in the Pacific Ocean, the U.S. government conducted dozens of nuclear weapons tests from the 1940s until the early 1960s.
    Vintage rolls of film collected from high-security vaults across the country show some of the blasts sending incredible mushroom clouds into the sky and massive fireballs across the landscape. Others start with blinding flashes of light followed by rising columns of smoke in the distance.
    A team from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory this week published more than five dozen films salvaged from government installations where they had sat idle for years.
    Lab physicist Greg Spriggs said the decades-old films were in danger of decomposing and being lost to history. He called them a big part of the nation’s history and an important tool for providing better data to modern scientists who now use computer codes to help certify that the U.S. nuclear stockpile remains safe and effective.
    “We don’t have any experimental data for modern weapons in the atmosphere. The only data that we have are the old tests,” he said, noting that the manual methods used in the 1950s to analyze the blasts weren’t that accurate.

  • Losing it for a good cause

    Twenty three people showed up at Fuller Lodge to get their heads shaved for a good cause Friday morning – to help the Los Alamos Fire Department raise funds for the St. Baldrick’s Foundation.
    The foundation helps fund cancer research for children, mostly through community “cutathons,” where people can pledge money to the foundation  and then get their heads shaved.
    This is the fifth year the LAFD has hosted the event in Los Alamos. Fire Capt. Micah Brittelle organized the charity event from the beginning.
    “It seemed to me like a really great cause,” Brittelle said. “I just thought it would be nice to have an event like this here in Los Alamos.”  
    The St. Baldrick’s Los Alamos County Fire Department donation page shows the department has so far raised more than $1,300 for the one day event, and that number will continue to grow as donations continue to come in.  
    Last year, the fire department raised $7,500 for St. Baldrick’s. The department is hoping to match or exceed the same goal this year.
    Residents who want to help the fire department reach  this year’s goal can go to stbaldricks.org web page, find “Los Alamos Fire Department” and donate. The page will be up all year.