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Today's News

  • Dixon author tells of grandparents' struggle to survive the Holocaust

    Michael Benanav is a Dixon resident, who has written a book about his grandparents survival of the Holocaust called the “The Luck of the Jews: An Incredible Story of Loss, Love and Survival in the Holocaust.”
    Benanav will be speaking about his novel 6:45 p.m. Sept. 5 at the Los Alamos Jewish Center, 2400  Canyon Road. The community is invited to attend. His book is available on amazon.com.
    Benanav is an author and freelance photographer known for immersing in foreign cultures and bringing compelling images and stories back from distant places. In addition to his book, he writes and/or shoots for The New York Times, Lonely Planet, The Christian Science Monitor, CNN.com, among others.
    He is also the founder of the educational nonprofit organization Traditional Cultures Project.
    One December night in 1944, while sailing across the Black Sea on the deck of a refugee ship filled with Jews fleeing the Nazi genocide in Europe, Joshua Szereny met Isadora Rosen. He was 23, from Czechoslovakia; she was 20, from Romania.

  • Wartime tunes still delight

    The Los Alamos Big Band played old time music at the Gordon’s Concert Series Aug. 22. The band performed the sounds of Duke Ellington, Glen Miller and Benny Goodman to name a few.

  • Get your mind blown

    Los Alamos ScienceFest has expanded to more than a full week of mind-blowing demonstrations, interactive activities, art and discussions for inquisitive minds of all ages. The festival is from Sept. 5–13.  The majority of the festival activities are free and open to the public. The festival was formerly known as the Next Big Idea.
    Festival highlights include an appearance by former shuttle astronaut and Los Alamos National Laboratory employee John Phillips, drone demonstrations and giveaways, photography exhibition of early work by Berlyn Brixner, Detonography art, 3-D chalk artist, Rocket Day and Expo Day, among many others.
    In addition, live music concerts will take place on both Fridays of the festival from 7–10 p.m. courtesy of the Los Alamos Summer Concert Series.
    
“Los Alamos is a place of world changing ideas. Los Alamos ScienceFest celebrates this and explores how science lies at the heart of everything through an entertaining and engaging series of events, exhibitions and happenings,” said Suzette Fox, executive director of Los Alamos MainStreet.
    ScienceFest features nine days of interactive demonstrations, workshops, hands-on activities and dynamic speakers to engage in thought provoking discussion and even includes a few big nights out.”

  • Sharapova survives after losing set one

    NEW YORK (AP) — A year ago at this time, Maria Sharapova was sitting out the U.S. Open, getting checked by doctors and having tests on the surgically repaired right shoulder that has troubled her off and on.
    On Wednesday, Sharapova found herself down by a set and facing a break point early in the second at Flushing Meadows, bothered by the whipping wind, her own off-target strokes and an opponent who wasn’t backing down.
    As dusk fell and the Arthur Ashe Stadium lights came on, Sharapova came through the way she so often does in the crucible of a third set, beating 95th-ranked Alexandra Dulgheru of Romania 4-6, 6-3, 6-2 in the second round of the tournament.
    Sharapova won in part because of her big shots, yes, but also because she had more in the tank when it mattered.
    “Overall I felt like in the end I was in much better shape than she was, and I could have played another few sets,” Sharapova said. “Mentally that helped me a lot.”
    It helped that Dulgheru had played one set over the past five weeks because of inflammation in her right wrist, which was operated on in May 2013 and flared up recently.
    Dulgheru, though, pointed to Sharapova’s grit as a key factor, too.

  • LA to meet Goddard in opening round

    There’s been a change of plans for the opening round of the Louie Cernicek Invitational.
    The Cernicek Invitational tournament is one of the big early-season tournaments around the state and his hosted annually by the Los Alamos Hilltopper boys soccer team.
    Due to some logistical challenges — five of the eight teams in this year’s field are traveling a long way to attend — the Goddard Rockets will be the first team up for the Hilltoppers Friday morning. Originally, the Hilltoppers were scheduled to face the Santa Fe Prep Blue Griffins to open the tournament.
    Games this year will be played at both Sullivan Field and at Los Alamos Middle School.
    The Hilltopper-Rocket contest will be a rematch of their first round Cernicek game in 2013. That game went right down to the wire before Los Alamos prevailed.
    “That game went into PKs (penalty kicks),” Los Alamos head coach Evan Gartz said. “I’m going to remind the boys about that. That game should’ve never gone into PKs.”
    After that tough contest, which Goddard led 2-1 until the final two minutes of regulation, Los Alamos topped Clovis in the semifinal round before getting hammered 6-2 in the championship game against Roswell.

  • VIDEO: Feds Anger Cities With Airport Rule
  • VIDEO: Syrian Rebels Seize Border Crossing With Israel
  • Today In History, Aug. 28
  • Be There 08-27-14

    Today
    Game Night: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. every Wednesday at the Mesa Public Library in the upstairs rotunda.

    Mexico’s Megadiversity. 7 p.m. Mexico, home to 12 percent of the planet’s biodiversity, is called a “megadiverse” country. Travel through time with Bandelier interns Jessica Thompson and Fernando Mayani for an overview of how Mexican culture has changed in its relationship with nature. Explore the impact of modern society on biodiversity, and learn about conservation efforts. No advance registration required. Free. For more information, visit PajaritoEEC.org, call 662-0460, or email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org.

    The Zone is now open after school, 3-5 p.m. weekdays. It’s open to all school-age kids, and a relaxed attitude to noise applies, so if kids want to listen to music, watch a video, or chat with friends, nobody’s going to come by and say “Hush.” All other library policies apply.

  • Historical Society to host Fall Gala

    The Los Alamos Historical Society will host an evening under the stars starting at 6:15 p.m. Sept. 5 at Fuller Lodge. The fundraising event, which is black-tie optional, will include a three-course dinner, the society’s annual Experience Auction and dancing to the music of the Los Alamos Big Band.
    Tickets are $75 each, and many of the 120 available have already been sold. Only a few ticket remain for an exclusive pre-party wine and cheese reception, which begins at 5:30 p.m. at the Hans Bethe House on Bathtub Row. Tickets for both the gala and reception are $125. The public can also take advantage of the opportunity to meet and speak with the first recepient of the annual Los Alamos History Award.
    Tickets are available through the Historical Society’s website at losalamoshistory.org (click on the link to the gala on the right side of the screen) or by check to P.O. Box 43 in Los Alamos. Reservations must be made by Friday.