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Today's News

  • LA softball heads to regional

    The Los Alamos junior softball All-Star team will advance to the southwestern regional playoffs this coming weekend.
    Los Alamos’ juniors — comprised of 13-14 year olds — will take on a team from Colorado in the opening round of the tournament Saturday.
    The tournament will be played at Alto Park in Santa Fe.
    For the regionals, the host district’s champion gets an automatic bid into the tournament. Los Alamos plays in District 1 along with Little Leagues representing Santa Fe, Española and Pojoaque. Los Alamos advanced after Española couldn’t field a team to play for the District 1 title.
    Along with Los Alamos’ All-Stars, two teams from Texas and a team from Louisiana will also be vying for the regional title. Also taking part is Las Vegas, which won the New Mexico state title this year.
    The winner of the southwestern regional playoff will advance to the Little League World Series.
    If Los Alamos wins its opener, scheduled for 10:30 a.m., it will play again at 1:30 p.m. If not, Los Alamos will play an elimination game at 10 a.m. Sunday.
    The tournament is double-elimination format and continues through Wednesday in Santa Fe.

    Here is the roster for the Los Alamos junior softball All-Stars:

  • News for Retirees 07-27-14

    July 27-Aug. 2, 2014
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 662-8200 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations must be made by 10 a.m. for daily lunches.

  • EPA’s carbon pollution rules good for business, economy

    Some national business organizations have hammered the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for proposing new rules on carbon pollution from existing power plants, cutting carbon emissions by 30 percent by 2030, using 2005 levels as a baseline. What planet are they on?
    It’s ludicrous to pretend that climate change isn’t happening, or that it won’t affect every industry. It’s beyond comprehension that large business advocacy organizations, including the United States Chamber of Commerce, think that our government should stand by and do nothing, while climate-related disasters in 2012 caused more than $139 billion in damages, while U.S. taxpayers shelled out $96 billion in climate-related damages in 2012 alone, or while sea levels rise 6.6 feet by 2100 — enough to swamp Miami.
    Let’s be clear: the costs from carbon pollution will be terrible for business. Climate change poses tremendous risks — insurance premiums will skyrocket, electricity prices will soar, jobs will be lost, food and transportation costs will dramatically rise and taxes will likely increase in order to pay for needed infrastructure upgrades.

  • The Great War at 100: Revisiting the Guns of August

    On August 3, 1914, British Foreign Secretary Edward Grey gave a speech before Parliament that “proved to be one of those junctures by which people afterward date events,” according to Barbara Tuchman in her magisterial “The Guns of August.”
    The dour secretary appeared “pale, haggard and worn,” as he dutifully explained “British interests, British honor and British obligations,” all of which conspired to produce a commitment to defend Belgium against the militarism of the continent’s mightiest power: Imperial Germany.
    The issue involved more than the troublesome neutrality of that inconveniently situated little country. A few hours after Grey’s speech, Germany declared war on France, with the full expectation that victory would be achieved “before the leaves have fallen from the trees,” as Kaiser Wilhelm II declared. The day ended with Grey remarking that “The lamps are going out all over Europe; we shall not see them lit again in our lifetime” — words that proved prescient. The gloomy German Chief of Staff Helmuth von Moltke conjured a more farsighted scenario when he exclaimed to a colleague that their country was embarking on “the struggle that will decide the course of history for the next hundred years.” 

  • LATC hosting championships at Urban Park

    Gilbert Ratliff was on the winning side of two doubles contests Saturday.
    Ratliff, who with one of his doubles partners, John Charles, advanced to the final round of the men’s A draw, and with his other partner, his daughter, Sidra Hsieh-Ratliff, advanced to the final of the A mixed doubles. Both of those contests are set for Sunday at Urban Park.
    The LATC started its two-day tournament Saturday morning. In this year’s tournament are seven different age and gender draws.
    Heading into Saturday afternoon’s play, Geoff Mills and Justin Chang had advanced to the semifinals of the men’s A singles draw, with both of them winning in straight sets.
    Mills topped Cihan Akcay 6-2, 6-1 in his first round contest, while Chang, a hard-swinging, hard-serving newcomer to the tournament, swept Alex Tarra 6-0, 6-1.
    More than 30 participants are taking part in this year’s tournament.
    In the top men’s doubles flight, Ratliff/Charles is seeking its second straight LATC championship. Ratliff/Charles defeated Forrest White/George Margevicius in the finals of last year’s tournament.
    In mixed doubles, Ratliff/Hsieh-Ratliff knocked off Mike Fugate/Lauren Fugate 6-0, 6-2 to advance to that draw’s championship round.

  • Animal Shelter 07-27-14

     

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt a new best friend today! Be sure to check out the Petfinder website for pictures of all adorable adoptable animals:

    petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html

    SHELTER HOURS: Noon to 6 p.m. Monday – Friday and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. weekends.

    Also, be sure to check out the website at lafos.org, to get more information about volunteering, adopting and donating, as well as read up on some of your favorite animals and learn more about special needs animals or cats and dogs currently in foster care.

    All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations.

     

     

    CATS

    Bindi — A 10-month-old spayed female, tabby with white. She came to the shelter from Taos. This petite girl loves to play, but she also enjoys taking naps in the sun once she’s worn out from playing. She is a very small kitty and most likely will remain petite. Initially shy, she has now warmed up, thriving on making new kitty friends and greeting shelter visitors.

     

  • Today in history July 26
  • Come to Ashley Pond tonight for Gordon's concert, sponsored by the Los Alamos Monitor

     Ray Wylie Hubbard  says he's a rock 'n roll grifter obsessed with the blues, blackbirds and all manner of scoundrels having to dance with the wind. He plays Americana, folk, roots country, cowpunk and lost gonzo Zen hot stuff. His music is filled with irony. His "...problem with irony is not everyone gets it." Check him out at www.raywylie.com.

    Concert promoter Russ Gordon said, "this may be our best show of the year. A few years ago, Ray played one of the best shows we ever had in town.Opening will be be the Bill Hearne Trio. Find more at www.billhearne.com and at YouTube."

    The free concert starts at 7 p.m. at Ashley Pond.

    Tonight's concert is sponsored by the Los Alamos Monitor.

  • Obama to urge Central America leaders for help

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama was meeting with Central American leaders Friday to urge them to help slow the exodus of unaccompanied children from their countries, as House Republicans tried to get behind a solution to the crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border.
    GOP lawmakers said Friday they were attempting to coalesce around a narrow package of changes including sending National Guard troops to the border, increasing the number of immigration judges, and changing the law so that migrant youths arriving by the tens of thousands can be sent home more quickly. The package would cost less than $1 billion, several lawmakers said, far less than the $3.7 billion Obama requested.
    A number of lawmakers exiting a special meeting on the issue in the Capitol said they had to act before leaving Washington late next week for their annual August recess.
    “It would be a terrible message; leave town in August without having done anything, knowing that it’s going to create even more of a crisis on the border,” said Rep. Charlie Dent, R-Pa. “Doing nothing in my view means that these children will be sent from the border back to communities like mine.”
    Yet some conservative lawmakers remained skeptical about taking any action. “The acceptable spending level is zero,” said Rep. Louie Gohmert, R-Texas.

  • Moniz to visit WIPP

    CARLSBAD (AP) — Members of New Mexico’s congressional delegation have announced that U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz will visit Carlsbad on Aug. 12 to discuss the government’s underground nuclear waste dump.
    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant has been indefinitely shuttered in the wake of a Feb. 14 reaction that sent radioactive particles into the air above the repository and contaminated 22 workers with low levels of radiation. The release is still under investigation.
    Sens. Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich and Rep. Steve Pearce last month invited Moniz to visit the facility. They want to talk with him about recovery funding, how the money would be spent and why it’s needed.
    The facility is the nation’s only permanent repository for plutonium-contaminated gloves, tools and clothing from the federal government’s nuclear facilities.
    “We believe that the recovery is now at a stage where it would be important for you to observe the efforts directly,” the lawmakers wrote Moniz in June. “The workers and the community would also appreciate hearing firsthand the Department’s plans for returning WIPP to full operation. We look forward to hosting you in Carlsbad.”