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Today's News

  • Schools are behind Trinity Project

    Dear Editor,

    The Los Alamos Public Schools desire to enter into a joint Revitalization Project on Trinity Site in order to achieve the following for the benefit of our community:

    A) to have a steady and reliable income stream from leased land that would provide funds much needed by the school for both program and plant; and

  • Forum focuses on rebuilding Iraq

    It’s not every day that a U.S. citizen can add something as prestigious as helping to rebuild a war-torn country to their resume. However, urban planner Julia Demichelis and County Council Vice Chair Mike Wismer did do just that.

    Both Demichelis and Wismer hosted a forum Wednesday night at Mesa Public Library, at which League of Women Voter members and members of the general public were present.

    Demichelis has been a member of the LWV for the past six years.

  • Schools and county agree to agree

    Talk of strained relations between the schools and county over Trinity Site negotiations appeared to settle down during a school board meeting Thursday evening at Chamisa Elementary School.

    “I think the county and schools are very much in alignment on all business points … and some people’s perception of things is not correct at all,” County Administrator Max Baker said.

    Board member Alison Beckman responded to Baker saying she’s been involved in the project since the beginning.

  • Senate trounces Domestic Partnership bill

    A bill to recognize domestic partnerships fell well short of the votes needed to pass the Senate Thursday. The bill failed, 25-17.

     

    The gallery was packed by partisans on both sides, who were advised to be there before 8 a.m. in order to get a seat and then had to wait nearly the full day for the bill to be heard and another hour before the vote was taken.

     

    At one point during the debate President Pro Tem Tim Jennings, D-Chavez, Eddy, Lincoln & Otero, reminded the gallery that outbursts would not be tolerated.

     

  • Main hill road closed this morning for gas leak

    A gas leak on a New Mexico Gas Company line serving Los Alamos caused traffic delays on the main hill road early this morning.

    A call came in to the Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities (DPU), reporting the gas leak across the highway from De Colores Restaurant.

    “A driver smelled gas and called it in,” said Assistant Fire Chief/Fire Marshal Mike Thompson.

  • Bypass road best solution

    Dear Editor,

    I am responding to a flyer posted around town, with no one claiming ownership, opposing the Bypass Road.  It has many statements that are wrong.

    First, we must realize that the probability of  a dirty bomb being detonated somewhere in the world is increasing. If that happens, NNSA will surely close West Jemez Road to through traffic. Remember, two airplanes colliding with the World Trade Center gave us NNSA’s current “large intestine.”

  • Involve the parents - or not?!

    Dear Editor,

  • Say no to the Bybass Road

    Dear Editor,

    This is close to the dumbest idea in a while.  Help local business by cutting $15 million from their property taxes over the next five years.

    Los Alamos

  • I know it when I see it

    In 1964, when the U.S. Supreme Court was reviewing an obscenity case (Jacobellis vs. Ohio), Justice Potter Stewart was asked to define pornography.  He said, “It’s hard to define, but I know it when I see it.” 

    Well now, is this true today? Obscenity has taken on many forms and one is hard pressed to not only define it, but to recognize it as such.

  • IHMC youth to travel to Honduras orphanage in June

    In June, 10 high school students and four chaperones from Immaculate Heart of Mary Catholic Church will travel to Honduras to volunteer at Nuestros Pequeños Hermanos (NPH) orphanage near Tegucigalpa.

    The parish has sponsored mission trips to NPH in Honduras annually for 12 years.  NPH, translated Our Little Brothers and Sisters, is made up of about 500 kids, up to age 18, and their adopted “abuelos” who are brought into an environment of unconditional acceptance, sharing and work.