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Today's News

  • Gold in them thar’ hot springs

    Twenty-five years ago I spent my summers beside sulfur-belching hot springs in northern California. The hot springs were not as big as Yellowstone’s. Most were just a few feet across, one or two about a dozen feet wide. None of them were truly boiling, but they were hot to the touch and gases bubbled vigorously out of them.

    To add to the general ambience of roasting sulfur, air temperatures in that part of California each July and August are in the 100-degree range, and in addition to sulfur, the hot springs carried a lot of mercury, arsenic and other toxic metals.

  • 03-25-10 Update

    Brisket night

      The Los Alamos High School NJROTC will host a barbecue brisket night from 5:30-7 p.m. today at the Sheriff’s Posse Lodge. The menu includes barbecue brisket, potato salad, vegetable, a roll, drink and dessert. The price is $10 per plate.

    Authors Speak series

      Mesa Public Library Authors Speak Series presents Barbara Owens Alpert at 7 p.m. in the upstairs rotunda.

    Strings and Gateaux

  • State’s past to be aboard submarine

    ALBUQUERQUE — The USS New Mexico submarine being commissioned Saturday will carry mementos of the first USS New Mexico, a battleship that served during World War II.

    When the battleship went into service in 1917, the state Senate commissioned a 56-piece sterling silver set by Tiffany & Co.

    The set was returned to the state in 1964 and went into the collections vaults of the Palace of the Governors and New Mexico History Museum in Santa Fe.

    The set includes dessert plates, each engraved with a different scene from New Mexico history.

  • Higher taxes for goods, services

    SANTA FE — New Mexicans will pay a higher tax when they buy goods and services, from soap to car repairs, but Gov. Bill Richardson made certain on Wednesday that groceries will remain tax free.

    The Democratic governor vetoed a proposed tax on food that the Legislature had passed to provide $68 million to help balance next year’s budget. However, Richardson signed other tax increases that will generate about $170 million to finance government.

  • No way around Diamond

    Christie Kelly’s letter reminds me of that old expression “you can’t make an omelet unless you break a few eggs.” Diamond Drive, like much of Los Alamos’ Cold War era infrastructure, is old, dilapidated, and badly in need of repair. As the only arterial serving much of our community, its upgrade will not be done without considerable impact to transportation and people’s lives, as there will never be a convenient time to do the work.

  • Saving Diane Denish

    It’s presumptuous of me, a lifelong Republican, to offer advice to the Democrats, but I’m also a bit of a non-partisan political junkie and enjoy good analysis regardless of affiliation. So this is my good analysis.

    They may not want to admit it, but the Democrats in New Mexico have some problems. Republicans not only smell blood; they can taste it. All they have to say is ethics, and voters pay attention. Everyone knows which party is rife with ethical problems (for now).

  • An antidote for anxious times

    Over the last few months, the press has been filled with worried articles about the state of the union. “Pundits are beginning to wonder if the system is broken in some fundamental way,” wrote Evan Thomas in Newsweek. “Do partisan polarization, special-interest money, snarling news outlets and public disaffection ensure gridlock into the indefinite future?” asked John Harwood in The New York Times.

  • Blink and it's a decade later

    A cloud of black smoke pouring up from the Jemez Mountains caught my attention 10 years ago.

    I was looking for the next thing to do in my life. A fun, 20-year escapade in film and video as a producer-writer seemed to be winding down.

    Swinging from vine to vine for the next project seemed to work for a quite awhile.

    I got to travel around the world and made films for the Smithsonian Institution and PBS, explored the Maya jungles and covered the First Intifada in the Gaza Strip.

  • The mirror of Eruliaf

    March 20, 2010 — (DP) Disassociated Press, updated 3:39 p.m. PT (Pawlak Time)

      Beaumont, U.S. — The Iraqi military relinquished management of a Texas prison holding some 34,800 detainees to U.S. authorities on Saturday as the Iraqis continued preparations for a full withdrawal by the end of 2011.

  • Who will feed us?

    It all started, for me, with The Great Toilet Paper Shortage of 1973.

    It was a genuine panic, with shoppers wiping the shelves clean of TP (sorry, I couldn’t help myself) and even driving to the next town in search of more. We didn’t learn until later that it started with a Johnny Carson joke on the Tonight Show. Even though Carson apologized and the Scott Paper Co. ran ads showing its factories in full production, the panic continued; it took manufacturers three weeks to restock shelves.