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Today's News

  • An ecological disaster

    The Cerro Grande Fire — as the first major wildfire of 2000, also called the Millennium Fire — represented the first of a new type of “super” fire. At Los Alamos, even wildfires, it seems, change the tide of history.

      That such catastrophic fires — the product of an ecological disaster — would happen was, in a touch of irony, heavily researched in the low-elevation piñon and juniper and mid-elevation ponderosa pine forests of the Pajarito Plateau and the Jemez Mountains prior to the fire.

    Timber experts will long study when and if to what extent Los Alamos’ fire-blistered landscape recovers from this new type of monster.

  • District judges didn’t disappoint

    Dazzling the audience with their directness, judicial candidates for First District Court fielded questions for nearly two hours during a Democratic forum at the UNM-Los Alamos Lecture Hall Thursday evening.

    An audience member asked how it’s possible for anyone to have multiple DWI convictions and yet remain out driving around in public.

    “One of the problems I see is the way prosecution and defense work out plea agreements…this happens all the time,” said Division 8 incumbent Judge Mary Marlowe.

  • He stands by his guns

    Our beloved New Mexico has never fared well on those infernal lists used by publishers to grab readership. The best place to live, the worst place to get drunk, the city with the cleanest neighborhoods, the most likely place to get mugged on a Sunday afternoon at the park.

  • America’s deep fried arteries

    I recently read an article citing a study which claimed that obesity isn’t caused by food, but is in fact the result of endocrine disruptors run amok.  

    I never was very good at biology, but I do appreciate food science.  Manic metabolic endocrine disruptors lacing our bodies with layers of supersized love handles? I love it when medical experts give me an excuse to suck down another slice of cheesecake.

  • Support the armed services today

    Today, the American Legion Auxiliary will offer the public a symbol of service men and women’s sacrifice.

    The red crepe poppy is a reminder of the sacrifice of countless thousands called to war. Distributing the crepe poppies is an annual event undertaken by the members of Unit 90 in Los Alamos. Volunteers from the unit will come again to take part in this nationwide program in memory of the citizen soldiers who gave their lives in the cause of freedom.

    Funds collected on Poppy Day are used to assist needy veterans and their families.  

  • Picking sides is highly unusual

    SANTA FE -" The Republican gubernatorial contest is getting really serious. It’s so serious, in fact, that the state GOP chairman has jumped into the fray.

    Chairman Harvey Yates of Artesia created a three person committee, including himself, to review the negative ads flying back and forth between frontrunners Allen Weh and Susana Martinez.

  • Decorating the barbecue

    I rather enjoy making fun of so-called serious topics, recognizing the simple truth that most efforts in life are futile gestures and that we waste far too much time arguing the morality of dung beetles and the semantics of bingo games.  

    But as Memorial Day approaches, I take a more serious stance. I believe we need to take a hard look at what is really being commemorated on this holiday.  We need to remind ourselves what it means to “remember” the heroics of the faceless and nameless.

  • Registration open for church day camp, Bible school

    “Loved to Serve; Serve to Love” is the theme for the day camp that will be held from June 28 through July 2 at Bethlehem Lutheran Church. Once again, the church will host Rainbow Trail Day Camp from 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday -Friday at 2390 North Road. The Day Camp is for older elementary kids who have just completed third through sixth grades.

  • Running: Rees, Thorn have best predictions

    Ben Rees and Karen Thorn were the top predictors in this week’s pace race.

    The pace race, a weekly event sponsored by the Atomic City Roadrunners, was held Tuesday. That race, which featured a staggered start with those predicting slower times began before those with faster predicted times, was run along the bike paths near Piñon Park in White Rock.

    Rees, who actually predicted the fastest finishing time on the 1-mile course, was off by just five seconds, tying him with Thorn, who ran the 3-mile course.

  • Music educators to shake things up during the upcoming concert

    The fruits of music teachers’ labors are often revealed when their students take the stage. However, things will be shaken up a bit during a free concert at 7 p.m. Friday at Fuller Lodge.

    Members of the Los Alamos Music Teachers Association will step into the spotlight and prove why they are fit to teach.

    Ted Vives, president of the association, along with members Frances Meier, Richard Hannemann, Kay Newman and Gina Doorn, will perform in the show.