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Today's News

  • Having fun while learning in the snow

    Barranca Mesa Elementary School PE teacher Lynne Higdon was awarded $1,000 last school year by the LAPS Foundation for the purchase of snowshoe equipment for students in grades four, five and six.

    When the flakes were flying earlier this winter, 180 students enjoyed the new snowshoes.

    Higdon said, “My goal was to introduce students to an outdoor exercise in hopes that they will choose to get out in the winter to play.”  

  • Common sense is busting out

    Dear Editor,

  • Beware unsustainable expenses

    Dear Editor,

    Without the citizens who established our community’s businesses and service organizations and promoted the work done at the laboratory after World War II, Los Alamos would have either disappeared or remained only as an isolated military outpost. Neighboring counties did not want any part of postwar Los Alamos and neither the Atomic Energy Commission nor the state of New Mexico knew how to solve the “Los Alamos problem” of providing citizens’ rights.

  • Local fire officials urge preparation for fire season

    Winds blowing on an already dried out county landscape have fire officials concerned.

    “The conditions we’re seeing right now could start our fire season as early as this month,” said Los Alamos Fire Department Deputy Fire Chief Doug Tucker. “We’re trying to prepare folks and not scare anybody but it’s lining up to be a severe wild fire season.”

    Assistant Chief/Fire Marshal Michael Thompson agreed.

  • LA Mesa Law intends to stay small but powerful

  • Sunset in bill wrong idea

    We find ourselves in agreement with Gov. Richardson who has complained about the current version of the so-called bill limiting campaign contributions.

    The governor is right to complain. While the bill looks good, it is only for two years and then must be renewed.  His comment that this is nothing  but “temporary ethics reform” is on target.

    Why is the Legislature doing this? How about because the law applies to them and it seems everytime we turn around they are excluding themselves from this law or that one.

  • Kudos to council for listening

    The members of the county council should receive high praise for their decision in the bypass road.

    While there are clearly two sides to this project, it is also clear that the vast majority of residents are opposed to the plan.

    The council listened and ended the project and they should be praised for that courageous act.

    Residents packed the council chambers Monday night ready to give their view, pro and con. After a short while it was clear that the vast majority of residents there were opposed.

  • DPU receives Roadrunner recognition

    The Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities will be honored through the 2008 New Mexico Quality Award Program on April 2 in Albuquerque.

    The DPU submitted an application to the NMQA in which they gave examples of quality improvements they are working on and the process through which the improvements are being made.

    Some of the quality improvements the DPU has made include: meter reading improvements and software improvements.

  • School Board to meet Tuesday

    The Youth Mobilizers are scheduled to present their findings on high school drop outs to the Los Alamos Board of Education at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Los Alamos High School Speech Theater.

    Also on the agenda are first readings of Policies regarding sick leave, evaluation of licensed personnel and document retention.

    The board will discuss the sale of school bonds, the superintendent search, Trinity Development Project and the 20-year facilities renewal plan.

    The meeting is open to the public.

  • Risky business: Safety-minded cleanup of Area B resumes

    The site is shaped like a boomerang. Several discrete areas of shallow pits are scattered along a strip of land on the southern side of DP Road.

    Buckled pavement covers most of it, where an old trailer park used to sit.

    Material Disposal Area B is about to get busy again.  After two years of public silence, with only a few visible changes across the road from a row of small businesses, one of Los Alamos National Laboratory’s major environmental cleanup projects is shifting gears.