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Today's News

  • Talk on Thursday focuses on plutonium reprocessing

    There are currently several nails in the coffin of a nuclear policy that has strongly favored commercial reprocessing and recycling of plutonium. Ivan Oelrich wants to make sure it doesn’t pop open again.

    A recurring idea in the political tug-of-war between proponents and opponents of nuclear energy, nuclear reprocessing is intended to achieving a plutonium fuel cycle, and thereby provide a plentiful supply of nuclear fuel and a more easily-stored waste product.

  • Boys basketball: Topper big man wraps up a busy summer

    Not that at 6 feet, 11 inches, he needs to stand out more than he usually does, but Alex Kirk has been trying to keep as a high a profile as possible this summer.

    With deep runs in recent amateur tournaments, lots of people got to see Los Alamos’ premier basketball player in central Florida.

  • Girls rugby: U19 team picks up wins, advice on Ireland trip

    The sun slowly bobbed below the emerald-green rolling hills of Gorey, Ireland, as the Los Alamos Girls Rugby team battled to a 7-5 victory over Gorey High School June 19.

    Despite fighting jetlag, Los Alamos rallied from behind late in the match in the unforgettable victory.

    “The first couple of minutes everybody was kind of discombobulated and all over the place but then we just worked together and it was a good game,” fly-half Liz Dinkel said. “Everyone pulled their weight.”

  • Our View: Some more disturbing education news

    Education efforts in this country – and in New Mexico – continue to struggle. We have poured millions upon millions of dollars into our educational system with little or no result.

     

    We think it is a time for a change.

     

    In a recent report, the state Public Education Department said that there has been some improvement among student proficiency in math and reading during the past five years. The vast majority of schools still missed state-established goals for increasing student achievement.

     

  • Records management could see some relief

    Finding a public record should be quite easy, assuming they are neatly organized and easily accessible. That however, is not the case for the County of Los Alamos.

    Thousands of boxes stacked on top of each other fill the county’s annex warehouse. Inside, records dating back to the 1940s lay there, collecting dust. In addition, about one-third of those records have been recognized as past retention.

  • Golf: Normans win big at Reynolds Cup

    Curt and Jason Norman, two top local golfers, took top honors at the Ransom Reynolds Cup last weekend.

    The team of brothers cruised to a big victory at the tournament, played at the Twin Warriors Golf Course at Santa Ana Pueblo, topping their nearest competitors by five shots in the two-day event.

    What had been a pretty solid golf month of July for the two Norman brothers spilled over at least a little bit into August.

  • Reaching out to the community through music

    As missionaries through the Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Church, Sister Ormsby and Sister Jensen are reaching out in an attempt to form a bond with the local community. Their tool to create ties between themselves and Los Alamos is music.

    Ormsby and Jensen will present a devotional set to music titled, “The Restoration,” at 6 p.m. Sunday at the Los Alamos Ward of the LDS church.

    “Basically it’s going to be explaining in music how our religion came about,” Ormsby said.

  • Running: Klimczuk wins at pace race Tuesday

    Tomasz Klimczuk earned a spotless prediction at Tuesday’s Atomic City Roadrunners’ pace race.

    This week’s pace race started at the Guaje Pines Cemetery.

    Klimczuk finished in 8:08, his exact predicted finish time, running on the 1-mile course Tuesday night, outforecasting Ted Romero (14-second error) and AJ Markela (54-second error), both of whom were running on the 3-mile course.

  • But I digress...Warning: Don't snort dog kibble!

    We got new cell phones the other day.

  • Peace in the Valley

    COMMON GROUND Bob Parmenter, chief scientist of the Valles Caldera National Preserve said he will work with the WildEarth Guardians Saturday on a fence removal project involving 14 miles of old sheep fence and unnecessary barbed-wire fences on the preserve. In order to reduce impacts on wildlife movements (especially elk calves that can’t get through sections of the fences). Some of this sheep fence (net wire) has been on the Preserve for nearly a century and serves no purpose now – hence, the need to remove it.