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Today's News

  • LAHS boy’s soccer loses to Chargers for second time

    The Los Alamos High School varsity boy’s soccer team walked onto Sullivan Field Friday evening hoping to get revenge against Albuquerque Academy from a 3-1 loss two weeks ago in Albuquerque.

    Though LAHS played better in Friday’s rematch, the scoreboard read 1-0 in favor of Albuquerque Academy as the final whistle blew. The game clinched the district title for Academy and put the pressure on the Hilltoppers as they try to lock up a top-four seed in the upcoming state tournament.

    As the game began, it appeared the Hilltoppers had learned some valuable lessons from the first matchup against Academy, controlling much of the early action.

    Arthur Steinkamp, the Hilltoppers’ leading scorer, nearly put his team on top just two minutes into the game, as Jesse Prime made a pass to him in the middle of the field that gave him a one-on-one opportunity against the goalkeeper.

    Steinkamp got a good shot off, but it sailed high over the goalkeeper and the net.

    He nearly scored again 10 minutes later, as the Hilltoppers were given a free kick from 35 yards away. He measured the shot and had plenty of power, but it sailed just wide.

    LAHS head coach Ron Blue said he has been impressed with the way Steinkamp has played this year, especially since the start of district play.

  • Football rolls past ABQ Academy

    ALBUQUERQUE - Saturday’s game against Albuquerque Academy was a must-win for the Los Alamos High School varsity football team, and the Hilltoppers delivered with a 50-0 victory.

    After falling to Del Norte the previous week 51-25, LAHS needed a victory over Academy to remain competitive in the race for District 2, where dropping to 0-2 would have all but eliminated the team.

    Instead, the team sits at 1-1 in the district, and is still alive in the race.

    The Hilltoppers came out with a sense of urgency in this game, and were firing on all cylinders from the opening kickoff.

    LAHS got the scoring started early, as quarterback Dylan Irish, known primarily for his running ability, fired a deep pass across the middle of the field on the team’s first possession.

    The pass was perfect, dropping right into the arms of the wide-open Wyatt Saeger, who was sprinting down the middle of the field for a 69-yard touchdown to give the Hilltoppers a 7-0 lead.

    Carson Schramm came up with an interception on the next Charger possession, setting LAHS up at midfield, and the Hilltoppers took advantage.

    On the first play of the drive, Jack Stewart took a handoff and ran 48 yards for a touchdown, dragging a defender with him the last 15 yards, extending the LAHS lead to 14-0.

  • Cleanup effort near Taos seeking volunteers

    Los Alamos community members are invited to partner up with the Carson National Forest and Taos County Saturday for cleanup of Miranda Canyon.
    The cleanup will take place from 9 a.m.-noon at the canyon, which is located on the Camino Real Ranger District.
    According to a news release, the area has often been used as a dumping ground in the past and is now inundated with household trash, construction debris and discarded furniture.
    Those wishing to volunteer with county and National Forest personnel are asked to meet at the Llano Quemado Community Center at 9 a.m. for a safety talk.
    Following that, the group will start making its way up the canyon for trash removal. The group plans to return to the community center at 12:15 p.m., where lunch will be provided for all participants.
    Those wanting to volunteer are asked to wear long sleeves, pants and sturdy shoes, and bring gloves and water. 
    The Carson National Forest purchased the 5,000 acres of land in Miranda Canyon from the Trust for Public Land using land and water conservation funds in order to protect the watershed from private land development.
    The area is south of Taos, just west of Picuris Peak.
     

  • Community Calendar

    FRIDAY
    Gentle Walks
at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Gentle Walks is free. More information at peecnature.org.

    Summer Swan Song
at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Explore the cycle of stars and the exciting show of a supernova as seen in and around the constellation Cygnus the Swan. Price is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.

    SATURDAY
    Exploring the Geology of the Valles Caldera—Van Tour
from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at the Nature Center. Join local geology experts Fraser and Cathy Goff on a driving tour to examine the geology & volcanology of the Valles Caldera National Preserve. Price is $60 for non-members, $48 for PEEC members. More information at peecnature.org.

    Masonic Waffle Breakfast from 7:30-10:30 a.m. at Los Alamos Pajarito Masonic Lodge 66, 15th St. and Canyon. Price is $7 for adults and $3 for children 6 years old and younger. Benefits the Aquatomics Swim Team.

    Feature Film: We are Astronomers
from 2-2:45 p.m. at the Nature Center. This exciting, family-friendly film reveals the global collaboration, technology, and dedication required to answer the unresolved questions of the Universe. Price is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.

  • Longest yard sale coming to Jemez Springs

    Coming up this weekend, the Jemez Mountain Trail Sale will draw more than 150 vendors and leaf peepers to the Jemez Valley to sell and buy new and used items.
    Along with the sale, that will be from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, shoppers and onlookers can enjoy priceless views of the changing fall colors along the Jemez Mountain Trail Scenic Byway.
    The 14th annual Jemez Mountain Trail Sale – the longest yard sale in New Mexico – begins at San Ysidro near the intersection of N.M. 550 and N.M. 4 and continues 12 miles past Jemez Springs to La Cueva.
    The Longest Yard Sale covers more than 30 miles.
    Off N.M. 4, the sale continues along the highway near Gilman Tunnels and the highway near Ponderosa.
    A map of all “cluster” locations is available on Facebook at JemezMountainTrailSale.
    There is no charge to set up a table at a cluster location.
    Sellers are asked to register in advance with cluster contacts. For contact information and details, email joybandy@gmail.com.
    Items for sale range from pueblo pottery and jewelry to books, appliances and much more.
    The Trail Sale is also a great fundraising opportunity for nonprofit organizations.
    Drivers must obey speed limits and watch for sightseers and pedestrians along N.M. 4.

  • Weinstein case shows power corrupts for so many people

    Power corrupts. Worse, as 19th-century historian Lord Acton concluded, absolute power corrupts absolutely.
    It doesn’t matter whether you’re talking about a politician, an entertainment mogul, a corporate CEO or a police officer, give any one person – or government agency – too much power and allow him or her or it to believe that they are entitled, untouchable and will not be held accountable for their actions, and those powers will eventually be abused.
    We’re seeing this dynamic play out every day in communities across America.
    A cop shoots an unarmed citizen for no credible reason and gets away with it. A president employs executive orders to sidestep the Constitution and gets away with it. A government agency spies on its citizens’ communications and gets away with it. An entertainment mogul sexually harasses aspiring actresses and gets away with it. The U.S. military bombs a civilian hospital and a school and gets away with it.
    Abuse of power — and the ambition-fueled hypocrisy and deliberate disregard for misconduct that make those abuses possible — works the same whether you’re talking about sexual harassment, government corruption, or the rule of law.

  • Recent shooting proves dangers to store employees

    At a Circle K convenience store, the clerk shot a suspected armed robber.
    We expect to read the opposite story. Convenience stores can be dangerous places, especially for the people who work in them.
    This happened a few weeks ago in Albuquerque in mid-afternoon. The suspect was wounded and is expected to recover; the clerk was not charged with any crime.
    What was that clerk doing packing a gun?
    The incident brought to mind a court case from 20 years ago in which Circle K clerk Paul Sedillo followed a shoplifter into the parking lot and was shot and killed.
    The Eldridge case (named for the mother of Sedillo’s daughter) raised the question of whether Circle K might be civilly liable outside of workers’ compensation, whether the company was so greatly “at fault” that it might violate the “no fault” principle basic to the workers’ comp philosophy.
    It was a hot issue in the workers’ comp legal community, but the case was settled out of court so the question was not resolved.
    Conventional wisdom is that employees should never be instructed to pursue armed robbers or shoplifters. Let them take the money and go. I heard that message in dozens of safety seminars and passed it on to small business owners in my own seminars.

  • Talk with a Councilor is Thursday

    Los Alamos County announced that a pair of members of the County Council will host a booth at the Farmer’s Market on Thursday.
    This is an informal setting open to residents who would like to stop by with comments, concerns or questions. They will be available from 9-11 a.m.  

  • You Can See Clearly Now

    Nick Washington of HEI replaces a lamp in the Smith’s Marketplace parking lot Tuesday morning.

  • State Briefs 10-18-17

    Miners make extra room at WIPP

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Federal contract workers are expected to begin mining operations at the nation’s nuclear waste dump in New Mexico for the first time in three years following a radiation release that contaminated part of the underground repository.
    The U.S. Energy Department announced Tuesday that the work to carve out more disposal space from the ancient salt formation where the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is located will begin later this fall.
    The contractor that runs the repository says the work is expected to be done in 2020.
    In all, workers will remove more than 112,000 tons (101,605 metric tons) of salt, making way for a total of seven disposal rooms. At 300 feet long and more than 30 feet wide, a room can hold the equivalent of nearly 10,400 55-gallon drums.

    Motorist allegedly tries to run over cop