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Today's News

  • White Rock Senior Center opens

    Monday marked the first day seniors in White Rock didn’t have to travel to the Betty Ehart Center in Los Alamos for a hot lunch.
    The White Rock Senior Center was recently outfitted with a kitchen for the first time in its long history.  It also now has a bigger recreation area.
    “This has been a vision for many, many years,” said Los Alamos Senior Services Director Pauline Schneider to the applauding crowd Monday.
    The senior center was one of the last projects in the White Rock Master Plan. It was completed this year.
    Seniors who sat down for the lunch were treated to fried chicken, mashed potatoes, gravy, peas and carrots, rolls and fruit cocktail.
    Lunch will be served from 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. weekdays. Reservations are preferred. Reservations can be taken up until 10 a.m. on the day seniors plan to lunch. Lunch is free for seniors 60 or older. Others can attend for $7.50. For now, the best way to make reservations is to visit the center at 133 Longview Drive. Phones are still being installed.
    Schneider said that it will be a little bit before the other programs and features of the center are in place.

  • DOE releases report on state of labs

    U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz released a report to the public today detailing the state of the national laboratories.
    The report was in response to a request from the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories that the nation’s 17 laboratories should more publicly demonstrate their value and contributions to science, engineering, energy and other disciplines.
    “One of the recommendations was that we do an annual report on the state of the annual laboratories, a concise report that would capture annual progress,” Moniz said.
    The 212-page report, titled “Annual Report on the State of the DOE National Laboratories,” also includes Los Alamos National Laboratory.
    Since this report was the first of its kind, the DOE decided to give a bigger picture and go more in depth than it will in later reports.
    “What we decided to do is start out with a very comprehensive report that would also provide some of the history and go into quite some detail so that future editions presumably can revert to the much more concise updates with a strong foundation provided in this report,” Moniz said.

  • Udall weighs in on confirmation process

    During a teleconference on Tuesday, Democrat Sen. Tom Udall (D-NM) discussed the hearings on President Elect Donald Trump’s cabinet nominees, which began yesterday in the Senate.
    Udall prefaced his statements by saying, “Every president, no matter who they are, should be able to choose his own team and the Senate should vote without unnecessary delay.
    But Udall went on to state, “The American people also deserve transparency. They deserve to know who is running our government and whether those people have conflicts of interest.
    “Many of Mr. Trump’s nominees are extremely wealthy. Many are connected to or have run major political or lobbying efforts. Several cabinet officials have not released their tax records or finished their ethics disclosure process,” Udall said.
    Udall pointed out that the director of the Office of Government Ethics has expressed concerns about the fact that his office has not finished the ethics review process for Trump’s nominees and that some have not yet provided the office with the required financial disclosures. The Ethics in Government Act requires that presidential appointments confirmed by the Senate obtain OGE certification of their financial disclosures prior to any congressional hearings.

  • Gov. Martinez unveils plan to fix budget shortfall

    SANTA FE (AP) — New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez called on Tuesday for further belt tightening by state government as she unveiled a budget proposal to close the state’s general fund deficit and restore depleted reserves, while sticking with her vow to avoid tax increases.
    The budget plan for the coming fiscal year preserves funding for economic development initiatives and public safety agencies and extends recent spending reductions for other agencies and deepens cuts to the legislative branch and state universities, colleges and specialty schools.
    New solvency measures would shrink overall compensation to state employees and public school teachers by decreasing government pension contributions to the state’s two main retirement funds by 3.5 percent of salaries. Government employees would contribute more to maintain the same benefits, with less take-home pay as a result.
    “This sends a message that it’s up to state government to tighten its own belt – not our hard working families,” the Republican governor told reporters. “Furthermore this proposal will ensure that we have a strong, healthy savings account for the next oil and gas downturn or the next time federal government fails us.”

  • Garcia Richard pre-files gun bill

    State Rep. Stephanie Garcia Richard (D-43) will introduce  a bill next week that would require criminal background checks for firearms sellers who are not licensed to sell but are looking to sell or transfer guns to another individual.
    “What they’re trying to do is, if you wanted to go and buy a firearm from your next door neighbor, you would not be able to do that. They would make that illegal,” said White Rock firearms dealer Stanley Hayes. “It should be the same as you wanting to sell your car and you not having to take it to an auto dealer to sell it.”
    The bill would require a licensed firearms dealer to act as a middleman between the buyer and the seller.
    It would also require that the two people involved comply with all state and federal laws, as if a person was buying the gun directly from a firearms dealer.
    With the bill, Garcia Richard is seeking regulate all firearms sales by requiring both parties to submit to criminal background checks as part of the sale.
    Garcia Richard did not return several calls requesting comment Friday. The bill is co-sponsored by State Rep. Miguel Garcia (D-14, Bernalillo), who also did not immediately return a call for comment.
    Hayes thinks the bill would only discourage law-abiding citizens from selling guns to each other.

  • Winter storm warning until 8 p.m.

    The National Weather Service has issued a winter storm warning for the Jemez Mountains that remains in effect until 8 p.m. this evening. Expect snow accumulations of 3 to 6 inches in the upper Rio Grande valley and six to 12 inches at elevations above 8000 feet, with locally greater amounts over the peaks and along west facing slopes of the southwest mountains.
    Snow will persist today before tapering off early this evening. West winds strengthening to 25 to 40 mph with occasional gusts from 35 to 55 mph. the stronger winds will occur over ridge tops and exposed areas. Cold enough for snow at all locations.
    Roads will become snow packed and icy with reduced visibility in snow and blowing snow. Areas of blowing and drifting snow are expected with significant visibility restriction at times. Travel will become difficult or impossible at high elevations above 8000 feet.
    Precautionary/preparedness actions: A winter storm warning for heavy snow and blowing snow means severe winter weather conditions are expected or occurring. Significant amounts of snow are forecast that will make travel dangerous. strong winds are likely. Only travel in an emergency. If you must travel... keep an extra flashlight... food... and water in your vehicle in case of an emergency.
    More information:

  • Science Fair canceled

    Los Alamos Public Schools has announced that today's Los Alamos Science Fair and all Saturday classes are cancelled.

  • Prep girls basketball: LA drops 2-5A opener at Del Norte

    The start of district play didn’t seem like the start of a new season for the Los Alamos girls basketball team.
    Some of the same problems that hindered the Hilltoppers during non-district made an appearance in their 45-29 District 2-5A opening loss to Del Norte on Wednesday in Albuquerque. Los Alamos fell to 5-14 overall and loss a district opener for the first time since the 2013-14 season.
    “It’s all going to depend on how much fight they got in them,” Los Alamos coach Josh Archuleta said. “I pulled my seniors aside and I told them... ‘It’s up to you girls on what legacy you’re going to leave. If you’re going to go out there and give a performance like that, then I’ll invest the time with the underclassmen.’”  
    In non-district play, the Hilltoppers struggled offensively but were kept in games by their intensity on the defensive end. The same scenario played out early in Wednesday’s game. Los Alamos didn’t score until the 2:15 mark of the first quarter but its defense kept Del Norte (10-7 overall, 1-0 District 2-5A) from pulling away early on.
    The Knight opened up a 10-4 lead before Elena Abeyta’s layup with eight seconds remaining cut Del Norte’s first quarter lead to 10-6.

  • Dogpaddling in the economic toilet bowl

    Grants Mayor Martin Hicks told a legislative interim committee last summer that the only remaining coal mine had laid off 150 people, the population has dropped to 8,500 from 18,500 when he was growing up in the town, and there are 22 empty buildings on the main drag.
    But Cibola County has some possibilities in tourism and logging.
    On the East Side, tiny Anton Chico has an old school building with a functional gym and kitchen that could be used to house small businesses. And the economic development group would like to take over a meat processing company, but the processor’s building is held by the bank. The organization needs help to enter e-commerce and find markets for area farm products.
    All either town needs from the state is a little help – money and knowhow.
    And so it goes.
    We may continue to dogpaddle in the economic toilet bowl, but in pretty much any community in the state, there are possibilities. And, surprisingly, hope.
    So what do we hear from our leaders?
    The state’s chief executive offers a package of get-tough DWI bills. And in testy language, she defended her budget and picked a fight with the Legislative Finance Committee over their budget.

  • Project Prom making dreams possible for youth

    A local group is asking the community to donate gently used or new formal wear, including dresses, suits and accessories, to help teens at Pojoaque Valley Schools enjoy prom.

    Pojoaque Valley Schools, in cooperation with Buffalo Thunder Resort, will collect formal wear for girls and boys from Feb. 1-28. The community can donate the clothing at Buffalo Thunder Resort Players Club, Cities of Gold Players Club and the Buffalo Thunder Hilton front desk.

    Every formal wear donation will be entered into a drawing to win a night stay and dinner for two at Buffalo Thunder Resort.

    For girls, donations can include formal prom-appropriate and semi-formal dresses, bridesmaid or cocktail dresses, matching jewelry, handbags, shawls and accessories, and matching dress shoes of all sizes.

    For boys, donations can include suits, tuxedos and formal wear, gently new or used dress shoes of all sizes, neckties and bowties, cufflinks and handkerchiefs that go with the suit that is donated.

    For information, text 690-1166 or 709-0598, or email pvispac@gmail.com.