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Today's News

  • Ski club succeeds at junior national qualifier

    What a difference a year and more experience makes. That was evident for the kids on the Southwest Nordic Ski Club (SWNSC) team who traveled to the Rocky Mountain Nordic Junior National Qualifier Jan. 13-15 in Crested Butte, Colorado.

    Being up against all of the big teams from Colorado, such as the Steamboat Springs Winter Sports Club, Ski and Snowboard Club Vail, Aspen Valley Nordic, Summit County Nordic Club, Boulder Nordic Club, Durango Nordic Club, Winter Park Nordic Club, Crested Butte Nordic and Gunnison Nordic Clubs, the kids from Los Alamos definitely had their work cut out for them.

    Last season was the local club’s first taste of the highest level of competition for juniors in the Junior National Qualifier series, which is part of the United States Ski and Snowboard Association sanctioned regional races for kids looking to advance to the national and international levels.

    It starts with racing at the Rocky Mountain region qualifiers, then based on results there, up to the national level.

  • LAHS wrestling wins district trials

    The Los Alamos High School wrestling team was named the winners of the District 2-5A Trials, held Wednesday at LAHS.

    To win the event, the Hilltoppers had to defeat opponents from Del Norte High School and Española Valley High School.

    Defeating Española Valley proved to be no problem for LAHS, as the Hilltoppers took down the Knights 66-15.

    However, the Del Norte Knights proved to be much more of a challenge, as it took a great effort from LAHS junior Dylan Irish to finish off the match.

    With the teams evenly matched on the scoreboard, Irish was able to pin his opponent in the 182-pound weight class, sealing the 36-30 victory for the Hilltoppers, and sending his team and the supporters into an uproar.

    Also collecting pins for the Hilltoppers were Damian Gonzalez, who pinned his opponent from Del Norte in the 120-pound weight class, Trevor Brown, who pinned his opponent from Española Valley in the 145-pound weight class and Lewis Harvey, who pinned his opponent from Del Norte in the 170-pound weight class.

    Next up for the Hilltoppers is a road meet against Robertson High School on Tuesday afternoon. The meet will begin at 5 p.m.

    This season, the Hilltoppers are undefeated in head-to-head meets,  with wins against Pojoaque Valley and Hobbs.

  • Atomic City Update: Time running out to check out LAHS winter sports

    For anyone who has not had the opportunity to check out Los Alamos High School’s winter sports, time is quickly running out.

    With district play already underway for the basketball teams, just one home wrestling meet remaining and one more weekend to head to the ice rink to watch the hockey team play, it’s a great time to watch your local teams in action.

    The boys’ basketball team will host all four of its district opponents between now and the middle of February, including a pair of state championship contenders in Capital High School on Jan. 31, and Española Valley High School on Feb. 14.

    These games will be a great opportunity to see how well the Hilltoppers match up against some of the best teams in the state, and might provide a preview for matchups that could come later, in postseason play.

    The girls’ basketball team will also host its three remaining district opponents, Española Valley on Jan. 27, Albuquerque Academy on Feb. 7 and Capital on Feb. 16. With the district wide-open this season and no team putting good games together consistently, every one of these games could be important down the stretch. I’m sure the Hilltopper girls would greatly appreciate strong crowd support for these exciting games.

  • Federal communications law should be updated

    The Los Angeles Times published this editorial Jan. 17 on a Congressional bid to preserve net neutrality.

    Congressional Republicans breathed new life last year into the all-but-ignored Congressional Review Act, using it to reverse a wide range of Obama administration regulations on the environment, consumer protection and workplace issues. Now Senate Democrats are trotting out the act to undo a Republican effort to let cable and phone companies meddle with the internet. This particular turnabout is most definitely fair play.

    At issue is the Federal Communications Commission’s move not just to repeal the strict net neutrality rules it adopted in 2015, but also to renounce virtually all of the commission’s regulatory authority over broadband internet providers. Its new “Restoring Internet Freedom” order, adopted last month on a party-line vote, opens the door to the likes of Comcast, AT&T and Verizon giving deep-pocketed websites and services priority access to their customers for a fee. It also lifts the ban on broadband providers blocking or slowing down traffic from legal online sites and services, provided they do so openly. Such steps could cause unprecedented distortion in what has been a free and open internet.

  • Allowing innovation at FDA means healthier living, better choices

    BY PAUL J. GESSING
    Rio Grande Foundation

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is hardly a flashy agency. News releases about drug approvals and genetic testing don’t get quite as much fanfare as NASA’s latest mission or the Pentagon’s latest maneuver. But the FDA’s role as a gatekeeper of innovation has increased significantly over the past few decades, with billions of lives sitting on the sidelines. Now, with a rash of decisions awaiting the guidance of agency officials, New Mexicans have a lot to gain with prudent FDA decision-making that prioritizes customer choice over bureaucratic meddling.

    The Land of Enchantment enjoys some of the highest sun exposure levels in the continental United States, but this pleasant weather presents a double-edged sword. Melanoma incidence in the state is higher than the United States average, and the genetic component of the disease makes it all-too-easy for many to develop a malignancy. Personal genetic testing services like 23andMe have been able to point to some of the genetic variants that increase melanoma risk, pointing last year to the suppression of a gene known as BASP1.

  • Pet of the Week 1-21-18

    Azrah, a 7-year-old calico short hair cat, got the raw end of dispute between a landlord and a tenant, and wound up at the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter on Jan. 6.

    She’s putting on a brave face though, still hoping that special someone is going to come in any day and take her to her forever home.

    Azrah has been around and knows what she’s about. Primarily, Azrah likes to snack on canned food and prefers to be indoors napping in a sunny spot or sitting on a warm lap being petted.

    Azrah has had all her shots and is house trained. She’s fond of just about anything and anyone that likes her too, but she is especially fond of kittens and kids.

    Since Azrah is an older kitty, the shelter has lowered her adoption fee to just $35.

    For more information, call the shelter at 662-8179 or email at police-psa@lacnm.us.
    Photo By Paulina Gwaltney Photography, 910-333-6362, Gwaltney’s studio is located at 3500 Trinity Drive.

  • UNM-LA Community Education offers new continuing ed classes

    UNM-Los Alamos Community Education classes started this month, targeting a range of interests.

    From Health and Wellness to Language, from Home, Garden and Fine Arts to Professional and Personal Development, there are many classes to feed the spirit of lifelong learners. UNM-LA Community Education program coordinator Mike Katko invites the public to, “Come join us!”

    New and short-term classes begin each month, and the Community Education department is always interested in adding new subjects. Registration continues throughout the spring.

    Some of the new non-credit Community Education classes offered this spring include:
    How to Publish Your Book, a nuts and bolts course taught by Carol MacLeod, a published author with years of experience.

    Chinese Ink Painting-Poetry and Music, taught by Kahlil Tung, a professional artist from China, who instructs in the ancient art of ink painting thousands of years old. 

    Personal Self-Defense, a non-sparring course taught by Miles Ledoux, a self-defense expert who has owned his own studio in the Los Angeles, California area.

  • Senior services may be in jeopardy

    Seniors, take note: A state agency is about to terminate the contract of the organization that provides senior services to most of New Mexico.

    The termination demand has already been delivered, but a transition is in place, through Feb. 1. The organization that got axed is complying with the transition process while also fighting the decision.

    This potentially affects roughly 70,000 seniors who receive services such as meals at senior centers, home delivered meals, transportation, and caregiver respite care through government-authorized programs delivered by local providers.

    The state assures us services to seniors will not be disrupted. But a number of officials, including a few state legislators and Congressman Ben Ray Lujan, are crying foul and demanding that the state rescind its decision. They do not believe the state’s assurance of uninterrupted services to seniors. Lujan’s office said he will ask the relevant federal agency to investigate.

  • New ways scientists can help put science back into popular culture

    BY CLIFFORD JOHNSON
    University of Southern California, Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences

    How often do you, outside the requirements of an assignment, ponder things like the workings of a distant star, the innards of your phone camera, or the number and layout of petals on a flower? Maybe a little bit, maybe never. Too often, people regard science as sitting outside the general culture: A specialized, difficult topic carried out by somewhat strange people with arcane talents. It’s somehow not for them.

    But really science is part of the wonderful tapestry of human culture, intertwined with things like art, music, theater, film and even religion. These elements of our culture help us understand and celebrate our place in the universe, navigate it and be in dialogue with it and each other.

    Everyone should be able to engage freely in whichever parts of the general culture they choose, from going to a show or humming a tune to talking about a new movie over dinner.

    Science, though, gets portrayed as opposite to art, intuition and mystery, as though knowing in detail how that flower works somehow undermines its beauty. As a practicing physicist, I disagree.

  • PEEC debuts new fractals, ‘Sea Monsters’ show

    An updated fractal show will play in the Los Alamos Nature Center Planetarium at 7 p.m.  Jan. 26 and the full-dome “Sea Monsters” film is screening at 2 p.m.
    The fractal show incorporates math, science, art and nature in a full-dome planetarium show featuring original music. “Sea Monsters” is a film that uncovers a time when prehistoric sea creatures come to life.
    For more information, visit peecnature.org/planetarium. To reserve tickets, call 662-0460.