.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Two kinds of income inequality

    Income inequality is back in the news, propelled by an Oxfam International report and President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address. The question is whether government needs to do something about this — or whether government needs to undo many things.
    Measuring income inequality is no simple thing, which is one source of disagreement between those who think inequality is a problem and those who think it isn’t. But it is possible to cut through the underbrush and make some points clear.
    We can identify two kinds of economic inequality, and let’s keep this in mind as we contemplate what, if anything, government ought to do.
    The first kind we might call market inequality. Individuals differ in many ways, including energy, ambition and ingenuity. As a result, in a market-oriented economy some people will be better than others at satisfying consumers and will hence tend to make more money.
    The only way to prevent that is to interfere forcibly with the results of peaceful, positive-sum transactions in the marketplace. Since interference discourages the production of wealth, the equality fostered through violence will be an equality of impoverishment.

  • A tourist’s guide to the Roundhouse

    The state capitol is once again filled to the brim with legislators, lobbyists, state agency executives, legislative staff members and thousands of assorted visitors.
    If you’ve never been there, it’s worth a trip to see your representative democracy in action. With any luck, you’ll catch a hot debate or at least see a good show at the noon hour in the rotunda or a lively demonstration outside.
    The capitol is just a few blocks from the train station and an easy walk for the able-bodied if the weather is good. Parking is a problem, but drivers can sometimes find a parking spot in the new parking lot just west of the building. Hint: Some parking becomes available after the lunch hour when presentations in the rotunda are ended.
    Even on a dull day, you can enjoy the capitol’s art collection, which is spectacular. The art collection, managed by a foundation, has its own website, nmcapitolart.org, so you can read about it in advance.
    Part of the collection is in the new North Capitol annex and worth walking to see if you have spare time.
    Unless you call ahead, you might not see your representative or your senator, at least not up close. Legislators are very busy during the session.

  • Today in history Jan. 28
  • 'Toppers fall in first game against Sundevils

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper girls basketball team dropped its first of two regular season games to the Española Valley Sundevils Tuesday.
    The Sundevils came back from a 26-18 deficit at the break to knock off Los Alamos 51-48 at Griffith Gymnasium in a battle of two top-5 teams in Class 5A.
    Los Alamos got big showings from its stars, Amber Logan and Ashlynn Trujillo, but the Sundevils regrouped from a terrible first half to win it.
    More information will be in Wednesday's Los Alamos Monitor.

  • Be There 1-27-15

    Today
    A chapter of The Compassionate Friends will meet on the fourth Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. on the northeast side of the new YMCA Annex, Central Park Square, suite 140. Co-led by Eric Ferm and Valerie Wood. The organization offers non-denominational grief support after the death of a child. Bereaved parents and grandparents are welcome regardless of age. For more information visit compassionatefriends.org.

    The Dust, Drought and Dreams Gone Dry exhibit in the Upstairs Art Gallery. On display daily through Feb. 20.

    Temporary exhibit: Saul Hertz, MD: A pioneer in the Use of Radioactive Isotopes. Daily through Jan. 31 at the Bradbury Science Museum.

    Keep It Classy. Ongoing at the Fuller Lodge Art Center. Art inspired by classes and art groups that meet in the Art Center. Pottery, paintings, photography, jewelry, etc. The exhibit shows work created in classes during 2014, as well as work by participants in the Los Alamos Photography Club, Adobe Users Group, Life Drawing Group, Ashley Pond Woodworkers and the Beader Babes. Runs daily through Jan. 31.

    The Paintings of Francis Harlow: Portraits & Pottery. Ongoing through February at the Los Alamos History Museum.
    Wednesday
    Game Night: 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. every Wednesday at the Mesa Public Library in the Upstairs Rotunda.

  • Assets In Action: Never fall short of expressing appreciation

    I learned many years ago that it is the friends, books, music, games and movies you surround yourself with that help create the person you become.
    Last week, I had the pleasure of making a presentation to the Leadership Los Alamos class of 2015, soon to be “the best class.”
    I loved Robin Williams and after he died last year, I noticed a movie he made I had not seen. Ah, technology and sure enough, you can request a movie and watch it within a few days.
    I’ll save you the pain of the movie, unless you are up for something deep and profoundly sad from, “What Dreams May Come.” The truth is two children are lost in a car accident and later the father passes in a second car accident.
    The profound part was an exchange between husband and wife about the son struggling in school. The mother wants to ease the workload and the father doesn’t because he knows the boy is capable.
    The movie later shows how another conversation where the boy admits to the dad, that he isn’t as smart as the dad and always feels like he’s letting him down.
    Flashback to the Leadership Los Alamos session where it was admitted that youth often feel like they are continuously a disappointment when they never make the grade or do, as well as parents expect.

  • Geologist leads free trip though PEEC

    When Geologist Patrick Rowe leads a trip for the Pajarito Environmental Education Center, it always fills up with a waiting list equally as long.
    So this time, PEEC decided to bring Rowe to the PEEC nature center, to give everyone a chance to learn from Rowe’s extensive knowledge about geology.
    The free program begins 7 p.m. Wednesday. Rowe will share and discuss samples from his amazing rock collection, making special note of what can be found in northern New Mexico.
    The event will be a great introduction to local geology, or a refresher for those already knowledgeable about the subject.
    The program is free, and no advance registration is required. To learn more about this and other PEEC programs, visit PajaritoEEC.org, email Programs@PajaritoEEC.org or call 662-0460.
     

  • Top winners at County Bee

    Eighteen students from Los Alamos elementary schools and Los Alamos Middle School were at Chamisa Elementary recently for the 2015 County Spelling Bee. Over the last several months they’ve been attending school Word Clubs for practice through listening, writing and pronouncing thousands of words that could have been used in the Scripps National Spelling Bee and learning to think through the surprises. Most of the contestants are avid readers as well.
    First place went to the New Mexico Spelling Bee representative, Nora Cullinan, who is an 8th grader at Los Alamos Middle School.
    Second Place went to Olivia Koo, a 5th grader at Barranca and third place went to Sruthi Garimella, a 7th grader at LAMS.
    The last rounds with five spellers, included Philip Ionkov, a 5th grader at Aspen and Hannah Gartz, a 6th-grader from Piñon. Supporting the spellers were families, friends, and teachers who were there to cheer on all of the contestants.
    Spelling Bees have been in operation across the United States since 1925, with now-famous Scripps sponsorship beginning in 1941. Bees had been in place for many years and the smooth operation of the contest has been dependent on school-level coordinators, a school district facilitator, and supportive judges from throughout the county.

  • Working on a plastic bag ban

    When I was 4, we lived on a farm in Maryland. One day, in a weedy pasture where sunflowers grew higher than my head to hide the trash that the locals threw there, and through which ran a drain, that at the time seemed to me a stream, I found in that drain a discarded empty bottle of Halo shampoo out of which spewed bubbles.
    I thought those bubbles were beautiful as they caught, prismed and sparkly, in the weeds at the side of the seep. I called my dad. “Look! Look! See how pretty?” But he came and stopped me from picking up the bottle and told me it was trash and that people shouldn’t litter like that. It took only a moment of training to understand that what I thought was excellent was, when viewed through the maturity of right and wrong, a bad thing.
    It took decades to train us, and laws to forbid it, but nowadays most people know it’s bad to toss trash from the car window, or to casually drop a wrapper, bottle, or McDonald’s bag in the parking lot. Only arrogant kids or ignorant adults litter. Trashing is not something caring people do.

  • Job growth seen at 1.1 percent per year

    For economists, mid-speech applause is unusual.
    Jeffrey Mitchell got the treatment during his talk to the Economic Outlook Conference, presented by Albuquerque Business First, a weekly newspaper. Mitchell is the newish director of the Bureau of Business and Economic Research at the University of New Mexico and runs UNM’s forecasting model.
    I suspect that the applause reflected the frustration of the several hundred people in the audience, presumably business types, with the state of the New Mexico economy and the paucity of proposals for real action beyond tinkering at the margin.
    Audience approval came when Mitchell said, “It’s a matter of where we are uniquely strong and build on that.”
    In a post-conference email exchange with Mitchell, I said, “I believe we do not know and/or understand our various strengths and specialness. A detailed look at the state and its various economies might provide insight leading to policy actions that might move us.”
    Mitchell replied, “Perhaps you’re right that we’re not clear on makes the state special. But I strongly believe that any long-term improvement in the state’s economic situation must begin by addressing this question. And I think that people are beginning to recognize this.”