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Today's News

  • Pet of the Week 11-19-17

    Wilbur can teach humans a thing or two about optimism and having an indomitable spirit. Wilbur, a 6-year-old Boston Terrier mix, was a stray living on the streets of Albuquerque was hit by a car Oct. 12.

    Wilbur lost an eye in the accident and his tail is forever crooked, but thanks to eye surgery funded by the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter Allies, Wilbur is back to his old self.

    He’s 23 pounds, and has a tan-and-black coat. He arrived at the Los Alamos County Animal Shelter Nov. 7, and loves to greet every person that comes through the door with a wagging tail and a leash-tugging enthusiasm that makes everyone want to pet him and call him a good boy.

    Though he’s been through a lot, Wilbur now has a clean bill of health and needs no further medication. Volunteers say he loves all types of people, including kids. Though he loves to be the center of attention, Wilbur also does well with other dogs and cats and doesn’t mind sharing the spotlight.

    He also has a thing for squeaky toys, walks and hikes. Wilbur is also crate-trained and sterilized. He has also been vaccinated and has a microchip.

  • Cancer can occur in pets

    Many of us know someone whose life has been impacted by cancer. Unfortunately, cancer can also occur in our pets. As part of Pet Cancer Awareness Month, Dr. Heather Wilson-Robles, associate professor, and Dr. Brandan Wustefeld-Janssens, a fellowship-trained surgical oncologist at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, discussed everything owners need to know about cancer in pets.

    One of the most common types of cancer in pets is skin cancer, Wustefeld-Janssens said. Primary care veterinarians can usually treat cancerous skin tumors without referring the pet to specialty care. However, more serious types of cancer—including tumors that appear in the bone, mouth, glands (such as anal sacs), or lymph nodes—may require surgery, radiation, and/or chemotherapy.

    In some situations, Wilson-Robles said a combination of treatments may be necessary to prevent the cancer from relapsing. For example, an animal may undergo surgery to remove a cancerous tumor, but that doesn’t mean the animal is free of cancer cells. The animal may still need chemotherapy to remove remaining cancer cells from the body, which can help prevent the cancer from developing again.

  • MOWW set to meet Tuesday

    This month’s meeting of the Military of World Wars Chapter 229 will be on Tuesday at 6 p.m. at the second floor conference room in the Los Alamos Research Park located west of the South Mesa Fire Station.
    The speaker will be Commander Brian Gauck, the new commander of the Los Alamos High School NJROTC unit. He will provide an overview of his research on friendships formed by USAFA graduates.
    The meeting will begin with a social period at 6 p.m., followed by a brief business meeting and dinner at 6:25 p.m. The presentation will begin at about 7:15 p.m. The Military Order of the World Wars dinner meetings are open to interested citizens for the dinner and program with RSVP, or the program only at no cost. The Hot Rocks Java Café staff will be catering the dinner: Pot Roast and appropriate side dishes. Cost of the dinner is $25 per person. A dinner reservation made is a commitment to the chapter to pay for the reserved dinner(s). RSVP (yes or no) for the dinner is needed by today.
    Call LTC Gregg Giesler, USA Retired, chapter commander, at 662-5574, or email him at g.gieslercomputer.org), or Eleanor Pinyan, 672-3750, or email her at depinyan@cybermesa.com).

  • Atomic City Update: Ski season is finally here

    I have good news for all the outdoor enthusiasts in the community: Ski season is officially here. After months of warm temperatures, the lifts at the local ski resorts are open, or will open in the coming weeks.

    This weekend, for the 15th year in a row, Sipapu Ski Resort will be the first ski area in the state to open.

    “Thanks to our hardworking and dedicated mountain team, Sipapu is once again the first resort to open for the season in New Mexico,” said John Paul Bradley, Sipapu’s mountain manager.  “We’ve been watching the weather and taking advantage of favorable temperatures to continue making snow, staying up at all hours to make snow when the opportunities arose.”

    Though the Pajarito Ski Area was originally set to open for the season next Friday, the opening has been pushed back to Dec. 16 because of unseasonably warm weather for this time of year.

    From now until April, the slopes will be full of people, both young and old.

    People in this area truly are fortunate to have so many outdoor opportunities available to them. In addition to the ski resorts in the immediate area, there are many places within driving distance that offer unbelievable slopes as well, ensuring that nobody will get bored of the slopes all season long.

  • Hilltopper boys basketball set up for success

    One of the hardest things to do in basketball is build a team with great chemistry, one filled with players willing to look past their own stats to help the group win.

    With a team brimming with seniors, and plenty of experience, that is the goal for the Los Alamos High School boys’ basketball team. For the vast majority of the group, this is the last chance to leave a legacy. The time to win is now.

    As head coach Michael Kluk looks at his team, he sees experience as the biggest thing working in the team’s favor.

    There are eight seniors on the roster, including most of the leading scorers from last year’s team that earned the No. 14 seed in the state championship tournament.

    “We are certainly more experienced than last year, and hopefully a little bit more mature,” Kluk said. “Hopefully that will turn into some success.”

    Many of the seniors expected to play big roles this year got valuable experience a year ago. Four of the seniors, Antonio Trujillo, Michael Naranjo, Ramon Roybal and Jack Stewart, all averaged more than six points per game a year ago.

    Trujillo, the team’s likely starting point guard, led the team with 8.6 points per game, and dished out the most assists with three per game.

  • Young Hilltopper basketball team ready to roll

    This season, the Los Alamos High School girls’ basketball team is out to prove that the phrase “practice makes perfect” really is true.

    After finishing with a disappointing 6-21 record last year under first-year head coach Josh Archuleta, the team instituted an entirely new offseason training regimen.

    It was aimed at improving the chemistry of the team and bringing out all of the players’ best qualities on the court.

    Archuleta believes that goal was accomplished.

    “The strengths on this roster have been proven throughout the summer,” Archuleta said. “We played more than 30 games during the summer, and never stopped working preseason.”

    Archuleta believes that the team has a stronger sense of cohesion than last year, and that the results of that have shown on the court in practice this month.

    “We are the type of basketball team that is very unselfish,” Archuleta said. “We aren’t prideful in terms of individual pride. We are prideful in terms of team pride. If the team wins, we all win.”

    The players seem to share that sentiment, with several of them saying they have a different feeling about this season than in previous years.

  • Correction

    In the Nov. 1 Los Alamos Monitor article titled “SF’s call to halt plutonium pit program will not affect LA,” the article should have read"provisions in it that support requests for more federal dollars."​

  • Ex Sandia Labs employee indicted on fraud, money laundering

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Authorities say a former Sandia National Laboratories worker used her position and created a phony company to defraud the facility of more than $2 million.

    A federal grand jury indicted 55-year-old Carla Sena of Albuquerque on Wednesday on 11 counts including wire fraud, major fraud against the U.S. and money laundering.

    Most of the lab's work involves research, development and maintenance of nuclear weapons.

    A former procurement officer, Sena was tasked in 2010 with overseeing the bidding for a $2.3 million contract for moving services.

    The indictment said Sena prepared a bid for a company under someone else's name and leveraged other bidders' information to ensure herself the winning bid.

    Sena is also accused of diverting at least $640,000 between December 2011 and April 2015 to her father's businesses.
    It was not immediately known if Sena had an attorney.
     

  • Small prescribed burn planned for SF watershed

    Fire managers on the Santa Fe National Forest are planning to take advantage of unseasonably favorable conditions, including fuel moisture levels, air quality, forecasted winds and weather, to conduct a one-day prescribed burn in the Santa Fe Watershed on Thursday.

    The 248-acre treatment area is approximately four miles east of the City of Santa Fe on the east end of the McClure Reservoir and adjacent to the western boundary of the Pecos Wilderness.  Impacts from the hand and aerial ignitions are expected to be minimal due to the location and small size of the treatment area.

    Historically, low- to moderate-intensity wildfires burned through southwestern dry conifer forests like the SFNF every seven to 15 years on average as part of a natural cycle that removed leaf litter, eradicated disease and thinned the understory, making room for new growth. 

    Prescribed fires are one of the most effective tools available to resource managers for restoring fire-adapted ecosystems like the SFNF by applying low- to moderate-intensity fire to the landscape under specific conditions within predetermined boundaries.

  • Sanchez-Gagne seeks state district court judge post

    Maria Sanchez-Gagne, an attorney who served as director of state Attorney General’s Border Violence Division for ten years, has announced her candidacy for a state district court judge post in the First Judicial District.

    The judicial district encompasses Santa Fe, Rio Arriba and Los Alamos counties. Sanchez-Gagne, a Democrat, has thrown her hat into the ring for the district court judge post in Division 2, which was recently vacated by District Judge Sarah Singleton and filled with an appointment by Gov. Susana Martinez of Gregory S. Shaffer. Shaffer had been the Santa Fe County attorney.

    Shaffer is seeking election to the post.

    With a primary in June, party-selected candidates then face off in November of next year during a general election.
    Sanchez-Gagne has been in public service for more than two decades, including a post as an assistant attorney general as a prosecutor of felony child abuse and sexual assault cases, according to a press release issued by her election committee.

    She began her career as an assistant district attorney in the First Judicial District Attorney’s office as a prosecutor from 1996 to 2000. Her cases included domestic violence and child abuse.