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Today's News

  • LANL has successful turkey drive

    Los Alamos National Laboratory held its annual Bring a (frozen) Turkey to Work Day Monday, in partnership with the Food Depot of Santa Fe.
    The drive is something the lab has done for years. The Food Depot partners with 145 other agencies throughout northern New Mexico to ensure that people in the area don’t go without food this week, according to LANL spokesman Steve Sandoval.
    Lab employees and contractor Cray Computers donated 475 frozen turkeys, which are packaged with nonperishable food items also donated by lab employees during the food drive.
    Food Depot personnel were onsite Monday and have already taken the frozen turkeys to Santa Fe for distribution via their partners.

  • LALT to hold play reading Dec. 3

    Los Alamos Little Theatre announces a staged reading of “After You’ve Gone,” a new work by Santa Fe-based playwright Mark Dunn.
    The staged reading will be 7:30 p.m. Dec. 3, at the Performing Arts Center, 1670 Nectar St., Los Alamos.  
    Admission is free for this one-time event.
    “After You’ve Gone,” which takes its title from a song first published in 1918, introduces the audience to Adele Pike, who has just buried her husband of 36 years, and her two daughters and son-in-law.
    Amidst the leftover casseroles, cakes and pigs-in-a-blanket brought by her Southern friends and neighbors, Adele confronts the appearance of a former lover, and her family learns more about her in an evening than they had in the previous three decades.
    “I wrote an early draft of this play several years ago when I was writing about Greenwich Village during World War I,” Dunn said. “I have long been fascinated with how gay people throughout the history of this country were able to reach out, find one another and express their love in such a sexually buttoned-down country. This play looks at the complications of same-sex love at a time in which such love wasn’t accepted or understood.”

  • Re-opening of History Museum topic of History on Tap Dec. 1

    Join the Los Alamos History Museum for History on Tap at 5:30 Dec. 1 at UnQuarked Wine Room, 145 Central Park Square, for an engaging discussion about the new History Museum campus led by Museum Educator Aimee Slaughter.
    Learn the inside story of how museums create new exhibits and get a sneak peek into what to expect in the renovated History Museum.
    History on Tap, part of the On Tap series presented by the Los Alamos Creative District.
    Also, don’t miss the Dec. 30 grand re-opening of the Los Alamos History Museum! The festivities start at 10 a.m. in Fuller Lodge, with special guest speakers, surprises and refreshments. Explore exhibits, artifacts and activities that share stories of Los Alamos history, from the Ancestral Pueblo era through the Cold War as you experience the new History Museum campus for the first time. Begin with the new galleries in the Guest Cottage and continue to the Romero Cabin and the Ancestral Pueblo site on the way to the Harold Agnew Cold War Gallery in the Hans Bethe House.
    More information about History on Tap and other Historical Society programs and events, visit losalamoshistory.org and follow the Los Alamos History Museum on Facebook.

  • NM mulls partial closure plan for WIPP

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — New Mexico regulators have received a formal proposal from the U.S. Department of Energy to close part of the nation’s only underground nuclear waste repository due to safety and contamination concerns.
    The repository has been shuttered since February 2014, when a chemical reaction inside an inappropriately packed drum of waste triggered a radiation release.
    The closure halted the shipment of tons of Cold War-era waste from sites across the country, stalling a multibillion-dollar cleanup campaign by the Energy Department.
    The incident also resulted in an overhaul of policies and procedures, costly work to mitigate the contamination, and a multimillion-dollar settlement with the state of New Mexico for numerous permit violations.
    Under the proposal to close part of the underground area, federal officials want to install a series of steel barriers that would permanently seal off disposal rooms and other main corridors in the southern end, reducing the chance of waste disposal and mining activities stirring up dust and contamination.
    The barriers would reduce the footprint of the contaminated areas by about 60 percent, officials said.

  • White House Christmas theme: ‘The Gift of the Holidays’

    WASHINGTON (AP) — For her family’s final Christmas in the White House, Michelle Obama used the holiday decor to highlight her core initiatives as first lady: military service, education and health.
    The familiar crowd-pleasers are still part of the annual show:
    • A towering tree dominates the Blue Room, trimmed as it has been in the past to honor the U.S. military and their families, an issue Mrs. Obama has emphasized.
    • Larger-than-life replicas of family dogs Bo and Sunny will greet tens of thousands of holiday visitors shortly after they enter through the East Wing.
    • And no White House Christmas would feel complete without the annual gingerbread version. This year’s replica on display in the State Dining Room weighed in at more than 300 pounds, including 150 pounds of gingerbread covered in 100 pounds of bread dough to form the white exterior. Models of Bo and Sunny sit out front, and Mrs. Obama’s revamped vegetable garden is represented.
    Downstairs in the library, education is the theme. Ornaments on two trees are written with the word “girls” in 12 languages, honoring the first lady’s “Let Girls Learn” initiative to help countries educate tens of millions of adolescent girls around the world. Other trees in the library are made out of crayons or pencils.

  • Letters to the Editor 12-2-16

    An effortless way to help education

    Take the time to vote for the public schools bond in January.  It’s easy and almost effortless.  If your house is anything like mine, there’s a stack of papers on the counter where important things may get lost or overlooked.  Apparently, every college in the country feels the need to send a glossy publication to my home because a high school senior lives here.  When I get my ballot in January, though, I will open it immediately and check the yes boxes, sign and seal it, place a stamp on the envelope and put it in the mailbox right away.  It’s too important to get lost in the shuffle of pictures of impressive buildings and happy students promising a bright future.
    It hasn’t been that long ago that my oldest son started kindergarten and now, unbelievably, we’re nearing the end of his school years in Los Alamos.  The buildings have changed along the way with many improvements for which we are extremely grateful.  It’s been amazing to watch the transformation of the high school, middle school and Aspen, and for my kids to reap the benefits of new and remodeled buildings.  One thing that hasn’t changed at all is the team of dedicated teachers, guiding and encouraging my children from beginning to end.  

  • Use caution when lending startup money to family

    BY FINANCE NEW MEXICO

  • Do we believe in free and fair elections?

    New Mexico dodged a bullet in the recent election. We elected a Secretary of State who encourages voting instead of a candidate whose publicly stated goal is to suppress it.
    Congratulations to us!
    At a candidate debate in October, Republican nominee Nora Espinoza talked about only one issue: requiring voter ID. Her opponent, Democrat Maggie Toulouse Oliver, won by almost 100,000 votes.
    Voter ID has been shown to be a code word for voter suppression – purposeful organized techniques to prevent legally qualified Americans from voting.
    Some forms of voter suppression are now legal in America. Both legal and illegal forms of voter suppression were employed this year in several states. Pundits and scholars will argue whether voter suppression caused the election results or merely contributed, but there’s little doubt that many votes were never cast or never counted – as to how many, the pundits will argue about the numbers also.
    The 1965 Voting Rights Act recognized that voting practices in some states actively discriminated against ethnic minorities and other target groups. The law required that voting procedures be conducted so as not to discriminate against those groups. In states with records of discriminatory practices, federal oversight was imposed.

  • LA sports briefs 12-2-12

    The Los Alamos hockey team will travel to Durango, Colorado to face Durango Area Youth Hockey in a doubleheader on Saturday and Sunday.

    The Hilltoppers are coming off a 2-1 victory against rival Taos on Nov. 18. It will be Los Alamos' second and third games of the season.

    Durango has faced Cibola twice and Amarillo twice so far this season.

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    The Los Alamos wrestling team will begin its 2016-17 season at 4 p.m. tonight by hosting Tierra Encantada at the Los Alamos High School Auxiliary Gym.

    Los Alamos will be looking to win its second consecutive season opener against Tierra Encantada.

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    The Los Alamos swimming and diving teams will compete in the APS Invitational on Saturday at West Mesa High School in Albuquerque.

    Both Hilltopper teams (boys, girls) are coming off a second place finish at the Peter B. Barney Memorial Relays, the opening meet of the season.

    Los Alamos is expected to compete against Albuquerque High, Atrisco Heritage, Cibola, Del Norte, Eldorado, Highland, Manzano, Rio Grande, Sandia, Valley, Volcano Vista, West Mesa, Cleveland, Rio Rancho, Albuquerque Academy and Las Cruces High.

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  • Pajarito set for opening day

    After having to delay its opening day, Pajarito Mountain Ski Area is now ready to begin its Winter Season.
    Pajarito kicks off ski season Saturday with top-to-bottom skiing and snowboarding on the Aspen Lift with access to Bruce’s Boulevard and Lone Spruce. Additional terrain may be available as conditions permit, including beginner terrain.
    “Pajarito picked up eight inches of fresh snow with this latest storm and our snowmaking team has been very productive with our snowmaking efforts recently so we’ll open with top-to-bottom skiing,” said Tom Long, general manager of Pajarito. “Everyone will be ready to kick off Pajarito’s ski season on Saturday.”  
    Pajarito’s Aspen Lift will be open 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Discounted lift tickets are available at Pajarito’s ticket office, lift tickets are $29 for all skiers and snowboarders. Pajarito will temporarily close on Monday to allow its crews to continue making snow with the goal of opening additional terrain. Pajarito will resume mountain operations with lifts turning Dec. 9 through Dec. 11. Pajarito will then be open daily Dec. 16 through Jan. 1 during the holiday season. For additional operating dates beyond Jan. 1, visit skipajarito.com.