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Today's News

  • Meet Topper Freshman Academy candidates

    The community will get a chance to meet the two candidates for Topper Freshman Academy Principal on Monday in the Speech Theater.
    The position became available after the academy’s principal, Carter Payne, was selected as the new principal at Los Alamos High School. Payne will start as principal at LAHS July 1.
    To meet candidates for the Topper Freshman Academy, visit the Speech Theater at these times:
    • 5:30 p.m.: Jill Gonzales is the principal of Piñon Elementary School at Los Alamos Public Schools.  She has 10 years of administrative experience, which also includes Assistant principal of Bonita Vista High School in Chula Vista, California.  Her teaching experience includes US History and AVID at the High School and served as an Educational Advisor and Activities Director in Redondo Beach, CA.  Jill received a Bachelor of the Arts in Political Science from the University of California and a Master of Arts in Educational Administration from California State University.

  • Senior center play touches on aging issues

    The Los Alamos Little Theater performed a short, 10-minute play on Wednesday at the Los Alamos Senior Center called “Dead Right,” written by Elaine Jarvik.
    Director Pat Beck welcomed everyone to their theater and introduced the actors to the audience. She explained that this performance was a partnership between the Los Alamos Little Theatre, the senior centers and local playwright Robert Benjamin. “It’s not only a short play that you get to enjoy, but also a discussion with me and the actors,” said Beck. She explained that this staged reading touches on issues relating to aging and then briefly set the scene: “This play is about a couple who are having breakfast and reading the paper.”

  • Sarah von Sternberg is new schools, public safety reporter

    Sarah von Sternberg has joined the Los Alamos Monitor as the new education and public safety reporter.

    Sarah is from Spring, Texas, and graduated from Sam Houston State University in 2014 with a bachelor’s of arts degree in English. After moving to Austin shortly after, she landed an administrative job working for Travis County’s installment of the Head Start program.

    “That was my first job out of college and I am immensely grateful for everything I learned there,” she said.

    After living in Austin for two years, Sarah got married and promptly moved to New Mexico for her husband’s employment at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. She applied for a mailroom position at the Monitor but was happy to learn they had a reporter position available.

    “I knew this would be a great opportunity for me. I’m so happy to be putting the skills I learned in school to good use,” she said.

    As far as activities outside of work, Sarah said, “My husband and I take full advantage of the town’s beautiful and countless trails.”

    She also has a cat named Oppie, named after, Robert Oppenheimer, a huge piece of the town’s history. 

  • Phil Scherer starts as sports reporter

    Phil Scherer is a recent graduate from Division II Lindenwood University, and joins the Los Alamos Monitor Staff as its sports reporter.

    Scherer is a St. Louis, Missouri native, where he spent the first 21 years of his life before relocating to New Mexico.

    He is an avid sports fan, and can be found watching the St. Louis Cardinals and St. Louis Blues whenever they are playing.

    Growing up, Scherer was involved in the Boy Scouts of America, where he attained the rank of Eagle Scout, a distinction earned by just 2 percent of Boy Scouts.

    In high school, Scherer was a member of the swim team. However, during his junior year, he sustained a major shoulder injury that ended his swimming career.

    When competing in athletics was no longer an option, he decided writing about them was the next best thing. By going into sports journalism, he was able to combine his two biggest passions in life: sports and writing.

    He was a four-year member of his college newspaper staff, where he was a reporter, sports editor and managing editor throughout his collegiate career. Scherer earned regional and state awards throughout college for writing and page design.

  • Jemez Springs event to raise funds for veterans

    Fun, food and music will take over Jemez Springs Saturday, as 11 bands will help the community raise funds to help homeless veterans.

    The event is sponsored by Homeless Veterans No Mas, an organization started by local radio personality Dotie Brown, Larry Waisner, Don Conger and others.

    The concerts, which cost $5 for adults and $2 for children, will raise money to support the Fisher House Organization.

    The organization’s goal is to raise money for Fisher house, an organization that provides nearby housing for families who have veterans hospitalized at a Veteran’s Administration hospital.

    Homeless Veterans No Mas is trying to raise $25,000 to help get a “Fisher House” built near the Raymond G. Murphy VA Medical Center in Albuquerque.

    The concerts will be on two stages, the main one, which will feature acts at the Jemez Valley Community Center, and the other stage, which will feature more acoustic acts at the town’s gazebo.

    Homeless Veterans No Mas started in earnest over an experience Waisner had with a friend, who also happened to be a veteran. While Waisner kept up with his friend through the years, there came a day when someone contacted him to tell him that his friend had died of exposure.

    “He had died because he was homeless,” Brown said.

  • Shelter Report 5-28-17

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, (505) 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are micro-chipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are 12–6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Saturday, and 12–3 p.m. Sunday.
    Be sure to check out our website at lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting, and donating.

    CATS

    Mr. Whiskers—A big tabby cat that is about 4 years old. Changes are a bit stressful for him, so he will likely need a little bit of time to adjust to his new home. He can be independent, but he’s also very sweet and likes to snuggle when he’s in the mood! He is OK with mellow cats, but other dominant males sometimes bother him.

  • Food waste is money down the drain

    BY NATHANIEL SILLIN
    Practical Money Matters

  • Southwest Conservation Corps branches out in New Mexico

    On a fine April weekday we stopped outside Grants at El Malpais National Monument visitor center, one of our standard travel breaks. A group was lunching at the concrete tables under the ramada. Several wore bright jumpsuits. Their hardhats had a dark, rectangular insignia resembling, from a distance, the Caterpillar Inc. logo.
    Curious, I ambled over to visit.
    The logo was “SWCC” for Southwest Conservation Corps (sccorps.org), which turns out to have five offices around the region. The New Mexico locations are Acomita Lake, serving the Pueblo of Acoma, the Pueblo of Zuni and Gallup. The Colorado offices are the headquarters in Durango and in Salida.
    SWCC’s website lists 10 programs. In general the programs involve crews going to areas and doing all sorts of conservation work. The programs serve rural areas with one exception, the Barrio Corps in Albuquerque, a partnership with La Plazita Institute (laplazitainstitute.org).
    The Ancestral Lands program, based at the Pueblo of Acoma, has proven popular. Using the Acoma template, a Gallup office opened three years ago with a Zuni Pueblo office last year. A Hopi office is planned for this year.

  • Pajarito Mountain set for Bike & Hike

    Pajarito Mountain will open its gates this weekend for the summer portion of its schedule, known as Bike & Hike Summer 2017.

    The summer schedule, which runs from the end of May to the end of September, includes 19 dates on which bikers and hikers can hit the slopes for an entirely different experience than they will find during the winter months.

    On Saturday, the mountain will open for the first time since its winter season ended in late March.

    From 1-6 p.m., the lifts usually reserved for skiing will be turning, taking bikers to the top of the mountain for an exhilarating ride.  

    In addition, hikers can take advantage of the lifts and explore the vast system of more than 30 trails set up for cross-country hiking.

    According to the Pajarito Mountain’s official website, this opportunity allows these adrenaline seekers to “discover 1,200 vertical feet of downhill, cross country and free ride trails.”

    While visitors are on site, they can take advantage of the Pajarito Mountain Café, which will be open for lunch from 11 a.m.- 2 p.m.

    Tickets will be available for purchase on-site. They will cost $25 for the day for those wishing to mountain bike, and $10 for those wishing to hike.

  • Trump budget would allow sale of wild horses for slaughter

    PALOMINO VALLEY, Nev. (AP) — President Donald Trump's budget proposal calls for saving $10 million next year by selling wild horses captured throughout the West without the current requirement that buyers guarantee the animals won't be resold for slaughter.
    Wild horse advocates say the change would gut nearly a half-century of protection for wild horses — an icon of the American West — and could send thousands of free-roaming mustangs to foreign slaughterhouses for processing as food.
    They say the Trump administration is kowtowing to livestock interests who don't want the region's estimated 59,000 mustangs competing for precious forage across more than 40,000 square miles (103,600 sq. kilometers) of rangeland in 10 states managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management.
    The budget proposal marks the latest skirmish in the decades-old controversy pitting ranchers and rural communities against groups that want to protect the horses from Colorado to California.
    "This is simply a way to placate a very well-funded and vocal livestock lobby," Laura Leigh, president of the nonprofit protection group Wild Horse Education, said about the budget proposal.