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Today's News

  • ‘I love what I do and I’m always finding new ways to teach ideas’

    Naly Ramirez, 31, had a job she loved, teaching Spanish at a private language institute in Albuquerque.
    Even as she and her husband moved to Los Alamos a year ago, she kept commuting because she loved teaching.
    When her child’s pediatrician in Los Alamos needed Spanish lessons before a move to California, she began to see the possibility that she could bring her love of teaching to her new home.
    What started as individual lessons among health care and technical workers has now sprung into small classes of adult students, called Se Habla Español (Spanish is Spoken Here).
     “I love what I do and I am extremely positive about it. I learn every day and I’m always finding new ways to teach ideas,” she said.
    The four, weekly two-hour classes, cost of $110, and offer interaction, brain workouts, games, music and a grasp of the language almost from the moment you walk in the door, she said. The goals for a new beginner’s class, which begins April 12 and continues each Wednesday until May 3 from 6-8 p.m., include learning the pronunciation of about 100 words, exposure to talking about future activities, and other basics. Her classes are held at project Y in Los Alamos.

  • On the Docket 4-5-17

    March 6
    Ashley Martinez  pleaded no contest in Los Alamos Municipal Court to speeding 11-15 miles an hour over the speed limit. Defendant’s sentence deferred until June 3. Defendant also sentenced to defensive driving school. Defendant must pay $65 in court costs.

    March 7
    Gordon Runer pleaded no contest in Los Alamos Municipal Court to speeding six to 10 miles an hour over the speed limit and failing to appear in court. Defendant was sentenced to defensive driving school and fined $25.  Defendant’s sentence deferred until May 4. Defendant must also pay $65 in court costs.

    Ruben Griego was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of speeding 16-20 miles an hour over the speed limit. Sentence deferred until May 5. Defendant was also sentenced to defensive driving school. Defendant must also pay $65 in court costs.

    Russell Dupre  was found guilty by the Los Alamos Municipal Court of careless driving and not having a proper driver’s license. Defendant must pay $65 in court costs. Defendant also sentenced to defensive driving school. Defendant must also pay $130 in defensive driving costs.

  • HOME & GARDEN: Garden Club hosts pruning workshop to prepare for spring

    On a beautiful spring Saturday morning, a few local ladies (and a few men) gathered in the Memorial Rose Garden with Extension Officer Carlos Valdez to learn tips and tricks for pruning rose bushes. The New Mexico State University Cooperative Extension Service has been working with the Garden Club every year for 30 years on this particular talk.
    “It’s been a great relationship that we’ve had,” Valdez said, and thanked the Garden Club for providing all the beautiful roses in the garden. The Los Alamos Garden Club has been in place since the mid-1940s and has taken care of the Memorial Rose Garden since 1957.
    Although the workshop focused on pruning rose bushes, Valdez began the morning with general information concerning planting and rose care.
    Extra tip: It is best to ease into the growing season with water and fertilizer. In the same way, ease out of the season gently with those things.
    Plantings Roses: To explain most of his tips, Valdez used the example of bare root roses. “Find yourself a reputable rose supplier. You want to purchase the highest grade of rose that you can get,” he said. Once the rose bush is purchased, soak overnight in a bucket of water and plant it the following day.

  • HOME & GARDEN: Gardening is tough in Los Alamos, but there is help

    Green thumbs moving to Los Alamos often get a shock. Not only is the soil difficult to work with, but the water situation is a little tough, too.
    One can go all winter without a drop and a very expensive water bill, and then suddenly wake up to a deluge when the spring arrives. It can destroy all the hard work of nursing that flower or vegetable garden through yet another tough year. With the lowest annual precipitation count of six inches and a high of 30(!) inches, New Mexico is indeed a land of contrasts.
    So.. what to do? The New Mexico State University Los Alamos County Cooperative Extension Office suggests the key to lessening water bills and frustrations is to just go with the flow. Instead of planting Touch Me Nots, Black-Eyed Susans and Spiderworts, try for something a little closer to home, plants native to New Mexico that are just as pretty and can thrive on little to no water.
    For vegetable gardening, a little research into how the Native Americans thrived up here on the Pajarito Plateau can go a long way. They did it on just a little water and very little work. The Three Sisters technique has been used by the pueblo indians for centuries. They discovered that planting beans, squash and corn together results in a garden that’s virtually maintenance free, even in the driest and toughest of conditions.

  • Softball stays on top of district with win

    ALBUQUERQUE – The Los Alamos Hilltopper softball team stayed a leg up on the rest of District 2-5A with a lopsided victory Wednesday on the road.
    The Hilltoppers scored in each of the five innings of their game against the Albuquerque Academy Chargers, coming up with 5 runs in their first at-bat, then tacking on three runs in the third and fifth innings to close things out early.
    Reyna Lucero, the Hilltoppers’ ace, threw 3-1/3 innings and allowed just one run as Los Alamos pounded Academy 14-2.
    Wednesday’s game could’ve been a tricky one for Los Alamos (14-7 overall, 8-1 in district) as the Chargers gave the team a scare earlier this month. The Chargers, who have struggled throughout 2017, nearly pulled off an upset over the Hilltoppers in extra innings at Overlook Park during the first game of a doubleheader, but Los Alamos did come back to win that one, 10-9.
    But following the big first inning, there wasn’t a lot of drama to be had Wednesday in Albuquerque.
    Los Alamos features a lot of power in its batting order and had that on full display against Academy. Jayde Tucker and Taylor Collins both hit home runs, with Tucker also adding a triple on the afternoon and Collins a double.
    The two combined to go 6-for-8, scored six runs and knocked in five runs.

  • ’Topper baseball knocks off Academy in extras

    ALBUQUERQUE – The challenge for the Los Alamos Hilltopper baseball team heading into the final week-plus of its regular season is to remain viable in the District 2-5A race for second place.
    Wednesday, Los Alamos cleared a big hurdle of that challenge.
    The Hilltoppers came back from a run down late to the district-leading Albuquerque Academy Chargers at Marburger Field to force extra innings.
    Then, in the top of the ninth, Los Alamos came up with three doubles to take a commanding lead and ultimately pull off the upset over the Chargers, 7-4.
    Designated hitter Travis Gonzales looped a fly ball over the head of Academy right fielder Markus Parrish, driving in a pair of runs that would ultimately give the Hilltoppers the win in the top of the ninth. Third baseman Antonio Gonzales doubled in Travis Gonzales one batter later for insurance.
    Instead of Los Alamos dropping another big 2-5A contest, as it did in its district opener March 29 after earning a big lead in extra innings, Hilltopper relief pitcher Rico Zerr came on to pick up the save with little trouble from Academy’s hitters.

  • Church youth to give presentation on Mexico house build trip

    The United Church of Los Alamos and the Universalist Unitarian Church will host a joint program at 9:30 a.m. Sunday, during its services, hosted by the youth.

    The youth were part of the recent delegation that spent their spring break with adult counterparts in Puerto Penasco, Mexico. The group built an incredible three homes in a one-week time period, changing the lives of three Mexico families forever.

    “Our kids in LA are great kids, always enjoy being around them in any setting,” said the Reverend Keith Lewis, the Pastor for Youth and Congregational Ministries, at the United Church. “This bunch especially, no gripes or complaints, just good old fashion sweat and hard work.”

    After a long journey and an overnight stay on the floor of a Phoenix church, the teams crossed the border, unpacked their campsites and prepared for the work ahead. The work includes mixing concrete by hand for the three build sites, followed by framing day, roofing day and stucco day. The final day was a beautiful bilingual passing of the keys to a new home, the first set of keys they have ever owned.

    According to Lewis, their hard work was so well done that teams not only finished their daily projects on time each day, but on some days, even finished early.

  • The consequences of Susana Martinez’s decision to destroy higher education

    A few weeks ago, Susana Martinez vetoed funding for every state college and university. All of it.

    Since then, neither she nor House Republican leaders have proposed a plan to restore it. Because every public school relies on New Mexico for 30 percent-50 percent of their budgets, if not changed this decision will annihilate them.

    What does this mean for you? Plenty.Without funding, schools will either completely shut down or offer dramatically less education for much higher tuition; meaning many of our kids will have to go away for university. We will then have a less educated workforce, like engineers to design our roads, accountants for our businesses, and doctors to take care of us when we are sick.

    Furthermore, two-year schools provide technical programs for well-paid, steady careers like commercial truck drivers, welders, and X-ray techs. Those, as well as specialized classes for wind energy at Mesalands Community College in Tucumcari and aviation maintenance at ENMU-Roswell, could disappear.

    And does your child participate in a high school dual-credit course? Those are probably gone.

    The governor’s veto will obliterate jobs. Businesses start and grow where they can find people educated in areas like the ones described above; so they won’t start or grow here when those programs vanish.

  • Community Calendar 4-21-17

    TODAY
    Join the Los Alamos History Museum for an exhibit opening from 3-5 p.m. Friday in the Los Alamos History Museum Rotating Gallery. Culture and Collaboration: The Los Alamos/Japan Project explores the goals of this unique intercultural initiative to create understanding through shared history, partnerships, dialogue, multiple perspectives, and collaboration. On display through July 9.

    Astronomy Show: Solar System Revelations
at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Dr. Galen Gisler uncovers new revelations about our Solar System. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
    SATURDAY
    Earth Day Festival from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Nature Center.
Join us to celebrate Earth Day at the Los Alamos Nature Center, where there will be engaging activities, fun entertainment, and delicious food. Free.
     
    Saturday to March 5:
Earth Day Feature Film: We are Stars
at 12:30 p.m. at the Nature Center. This exciting, family-friendly film connects us to the evolution of the Universe and explores the secrets of our cosmic chemistry. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.

  • Second suspect nabbed for Bealls theft

    The second suspect in a March 9 shoplifting incident, where a male bystander was struck by a fleeing vehicle, is now in custody in the Los Alamos Detention Center.

    The shoplifting incident took place early afternoon at Bealls Department Store. 

    Stephanie Garcia, 31, was transported from Española Tuesday to the center. Before being booked, she was charged with shoplifting (more than $250, less than $2,500) and conspiracy. Both charges are fourth-degree felonies. Garcia is being held without bail until her initial hearing before a judge, which is expected to be this week. 

    Police arrested the second  suspect, Ashley Garcia, 23, of Hernandez, March 13. Garcia remains in custody at the LADC pending her preliminary hearing May 4. 

    The two women are not related. Garcia was charged with shoplifting (over $500 but not more than $2,500), aggravated battery with a deadly weapon and failure to give and render aid.

    Ashley Garcia described Stephanie Garcia as a “friend” in an interview with police about the incident. Ashley Garcia was arrested Rio Arriba County Sheriff’s deputies March 14 for the March 9 incident.