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Today's News

  • Pet Talk: preventing diabetes in dogs

    Diabetes mellitus, also called sugar diabetes, is becoming more prevalent in today’s society. Like humans, dogs can develop diabetes and may need medical care throughout their lifetime to manage the disease.
    Diabetes mellitus is characterized by a lack or relative deficiency of a hormone called insulin. This hormone is produced by the pancreas and is needed to store energy from food and to use glucose for fuel. Dr. Audrey Cook, associate professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, explained how an insulin deficiency can negatively affect a dog’s health.
    “In people, the two most common forms of diabetes are Type 1 and Type 2,” she said. “Type 1 diabetics do not make insulin at all and will need insulin injections for life. This is typically the type of diabetes that we see in dogs. In some cases, chronic inflammation of the pancreas—called pancreatitis—can gradually destroy cells that produce insulin in canines, resulting in diabetes. On rare occasions, we even see dogs that become transiently diabetic following a heat cycle. This is called diestrus diabetes.”

  • Animal Shelter 2-7-16

    The Los Alamos Animal Shelter, 226 East Road, 662-8179, has a great selection of adoptable pets just waiting for their forever home, so come adopt your new best friend today! All adoptable pets are microchipped, spayed or neutered, and up-to-date on vaccinations. Shelter hours are noon – 6 p.m. Monday through Friday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. Saturday, and noon–3 p.m. Sunday.
    Be sure to check out our website at lafos.org, where you can get more information about volunteering, adopting, and donating. You can also check out our Petfinder website for pictures of our adorable adoptable animals: petfinder.com/shelters/friendsoftheshelter.html.
    CATS  
    Fluffy—One cool cat! This 6-month-old male tabby was surrendered with his sibling Stripes. Fluffy can play all day long, but when he’s done playing, he’s ready for some snuggles! Fluffy is confident and fun, and he would light up any home. Fluffy is very friendly with other fun-loving cats, and he would likely do best in a home with another cat (or even a dog) to keep him company.

  • House proposes responsible budget for New Mexico

    BY REP. LARRY LARRANAGA
    Chair, House Appropriations and Finance Committee, Dist. 27

  • Economic policy: a long-ignored issue

    BY JOE D'ANNA
    Los Alamos

  • Debates stay mum on smart tools

    BP’s lengthy oil spill in the Gulf and the Keystone Pipeline are issues long familiar to people of all walks. In sharp contrast, who ever heard of Structural Health Monitoring?  
    I first heard the term just two months ago. I was quickly amazed to see the extent of new techniques available to guard against leaky oil pipes of all kinds. Why does anything so relevant stay hidden from public news?  
    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is well explained in Wikipedia. SHM refers to methods of gauging damage in materials and other safety aspects of engineered structures. Devices tied into structures detect changes as materials age. From the changes, computing parts assess safety. Call them “smart tools.”
    The tools can check and report frequently on the well-being of structures such as bridges, airplanes and pipelines. The results, in turn, point to in-situ methods of timely repair. “In-situ” repair means repairing in place without tearing things open.
    SHM is no mere glint on the horizon. It thrives now and keeps improving. The discipline of SHM has an international society of its own with its own technical journal. The 10th International Workshop on SHM was held last fall at Stanford University. Princeton offers a graduate course in SHM. The topic clearly has history and substance.

  • Vote for Ona!

    Ona Gartz, an eighth-grader at Los Alamos Middle School, was just like any other middle-school student at a special assembly put on by Google Friday. She was surprised when Google representatives Nicholas Maurette and Tobias Rauscher called her name, telling her that she was the only winner in the state of New Mexico of the company’s “Doodle4Google” logo contest with her entry, “Colors Of My Island (above).” Ona now moves on to the “national finalist” category, where people can vote for her logo to help make her, and Los Alamos Middle School, the national winner. Go to doodle4google.com and follow the links. Look for the story in next week’s Los Alamos Monitor.

  • Oregon protestors lost in court of public opinion

    At the first news of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge occupation, some of us wondered if it could happen here. The way it played out, that’s not likely.

    It began with Oregon ranchers Dwight Hammond Jr. and his son Steven being convicted by a jury of arson, but the sentences jumped from months to five years because of a federal anti-terrorism law passed in response to the Oklahoma City bombing. The sentences sparked a protest by ranchers and militiamen in Burns, Oregon, and a few armed protesters led by Ammon Bundy took over the nearby refuge. 

    We’ve learned more about the players. In interviews, current and former employees of the wildlife refuge describe decades of hostility and death threats from the Hammonds. 

    “They said they were going to wrap my son in barbed wire and throw him down a well. They said they knew exactly which rooms my kids slept in,” said a former director. 

  • 'Longmire': Film industry supports local communities

    Saturday’s “Longmire” casting call in Española was co-sponsored by the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts of the United States, Local 480, and doubled as a “thank you” to Sen. Richard Martinez (D-District 5), whom the union called a “champion of workers.”

    Martinez was held up on Senate business and was unable to attend, but Jon Henry, business agent for the local IATSE, spoke with the Los Alamos Monitor about the film industry’s role in boosting local economies. 

    “Basically, what we’re doing is coming into the communities where ‘Longmire’ shoots and making sure there’s economic activity in these communities,” Henry said. “The picture business can’t just be about Santa Fe and Albuquerque, it’s got to be about everywhere.”

    The casting call had a dual purpose, not only giving local people a chance to work as background actors on Longmire but reaching out to potential vendors in the local business community. 

    “That’s really our goal, is to get as many local people making money from these movies as we can,” Henry said. 

  • Sanchez-Gagne files for DA

    Santa Fe native and long-time prosecutor, Maria Sanchez-Gagne, announced Thursday that she will seek the position of district attorney for the First Judicial District, representing Santa Fe, Rio Arriba and Los Alamos counties. Sanchez-Gagne is collecting petition signatures and will formally file her declaration of candidacy with the Secretary of State on candidate filing day on March 8.

     “I am pleased to announce my candidacy for this position. I have served our community for 20 years as a criminal prosecutor seeking justice for victims,” said Sanchez-Gagne.  “As your next District Attorney, I will not shy away from prosecuting difficult cases in order to ensure community safety.  I will serve you with honesty, integrity and experience.”

    Sanchez-Gagne has 20 years of experience. She was director of the Border Violence Vision of the State’s Office of the Attorney General from 2005-2015. Prior to that she was an assistant Attorney General. Sanchez-Gagne began her career as an assistant District Attorney in the First Judicial District DA’s Office where she prosecuted felony child abuse cases and domestic violence cases from 1996-2000. 

  • Arizona regulators approve SunZia project

    PHOENIX (AP) — Arizona utility regulators have authorized construction of a controversial planned $2 billion transmission line between Arizona and New Mexico.

    The Arizona Corporation Commission voted 3-2 Wednesday to approve the 515-mile-long SunZia Southwest Transmission Project. The certificate is one of the last major permits the project needs.

    The SunZia project aims to tap into wind resources in New Mexico as well as solar and geothermal potential in New Mexico and Arizona. The line will export electricity to markets in the West.

     

    Commissioners Andy Tobin, Bob Stump and Bob Burns voted for approval, while Commissioners Tom Forese and Doug Little voted no.