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Today's News

  • Hilltopper hockey scores three wins in El Paso

    The Los Alamos hockey team won three of the four games it played in El Paso, Texas, last weekend.
    The Hilltoppers split two games with the defending composite champs, Franklin. Los Alamos then took two games from Coronado.
    With the wins, the Hilltoppers moved up into fourth place in the New Mexico Interscholastic Ice Hockey League with an 8-6-3 overall record.
    Against Franklin, which is currently sitting in second with an 11-7 record, Los Alamos won the first game, 5-3, despite being out shot 36-20 in the contest.
    Franklin, which has the top two scores in the league, jumped out to a 2-0 lead. Cory Schramm and Ben Roback, however, scored to tie the contest.
    In the second period, Brett Ireland scored to put Los Alamos on top, but Franklin was able to tie it back up.
    Later in the second, Jacob Rutten scored what proved to be the game-winning goal for Los Alamos. Brett Ireland then added an insurance goal in the third.
    Isaac Dunwoody made 33 saves for a .917 save percentage in the win.
    The two teams squared off again Saturday morning, but this time Franklin rallied to score a 10-7 win.
    Griffin Matuszak, Jacob Dunwoody and Chris Bond scored to put Los Alamos up 3-0 in the second period. Franklin responded with three goals, but a Roback goal put Los Alamos back in front heading into the third period.

  • Leonard commits to Western

    Wednesday was national signing day and many of the top high school athletes from across the country committed to the universities where they’ll compete at the next level.
    Los Alamos had several athletes commit to colleges during the early signing period. Ashlynn Trujillo (New Mexico Highlands University, basketball), Brianna Montaño (New Mexico Highlands, volleyball), Sarah Lott (University of Utah, swimming), Lane Saunders (Eastern New Mexico University, baseball) and Connor Mang (University of New Mexico, baseball) all signed early.
    Like them, Charlotte Leonard had already made up her mind that she would be attending Western State Colorado University after graduating from Los Alamos.
    On Wednesday, however, Leonard made it official. The mid-fielder signed her letter of intent to play soccer for the Mountaineers next year.
    “She’s a coach’s dream,” Los Alamos head girls’ soccer coach Gary Ahlers said. “She’s a high-energy player and will attempt to do anything you ask her.”
    Leonard, who also plays club soccer Albuquerque’s Rush ’98 Nero, said Western’s coach, Jeremy Clevenger, first contacted her when she was a freshman.
    He wanted to see her play, so Leonard and teammate Emily Hopkins attended Western’s summer camp.

  • Pajarito reopening Townsight after rat attack

    Last Saturday, the crew at Pajarito Mountain went over to the Townsight lift and tried to fire the lift up for the weekend. There was a problem, however, and the lift didn’t move.
    “That baby wouldn’t go,” Pajarito’s General Manager Tom Long said.
    After some trouble shooting, Pajarito’s crew found out was wrong with the lift — a pack rat had climbed up the top tower and chewed up all of the safety wires.
    “We had to totally re-wire the tower,” Long said.
    He said they finished rewiring it last Sunday and it will be spinning this weekend. They also got the problem rat out of the tower.
    “The lift is all set to go and we’ll run it Saturday and Sunday,” Long said.
    In roughly the last decade, Long said that this is the third incident of a pack rat climbing a tower and chewing up the wires. Additionally, the rats carry leaves and sticks up and make nests in the towers.
    When the Townsight lift reopens this weekend, however, people won’t be thinking about rats.
    They’ll be thinking about the 10 inches of new snow that’s just been sitting there.
    A storm hung around on the ski area Sunday night through Tuesday, when the ski area was closed. When it reopened Wednesday, a line of people was waiting for first tracks.

  • LA boys lose nail biter against Del Norte

    The Los Alamos boys’ basketball team nearly knocked off Del Norte Wednesday night. In the end, however, the Knights were two points ahead of the ’Toppers, and won the game 67-65.
    Del Norte jumped out to a 21-12 lead in the first quarter, but Los Alamos fought back and won the next two quarters. The ’Toppers outscored the Knights 17-14 in the second and 22-15 in the third to take a 51-50 lead into the fourth.
    Los Alamos couldn’t sustain the lead, though.
    The loss snapped a two-game win streak for Los Alamos. The Hilltoppers moved to 8-14 overall and 1-3 in District 2-5A after Wednesday’s defeat.
    Del Norte improved to 9-11, 2-2.
    Also on Wednesday, Bernalillo beat Española Valley 47-45.
    Bernalillo also beat Capital while Los Alamos and Del Norte both defeated Bernalillo.
    After one round of district games, Capital remains in first place with a 19-3, 3-1 record. Bernalillo, Española Valley and Del Norte are all 2-2 in the district.
    With as much parity as there is in the district, however, Los Alamos could easily move up in the final standings.
    Los Alamos’ next game is Saturday. The ’Toppers will host Capital at 7 p.m.
     

  • LA girls move into three-way tie for first

    The Los Alamos girls' basketball team completed its first round of District 2-5A games Tuesday, beating Del Norte 45-30.
    Del Norte had previously beaten Española Valley, the team that gave Los Alamos its lone district loss. Now all three of those squads share the lead in the district standings.
    "It was huge," Los Alamos head coach Nestor Trujillo said. "Now we have a three-way tie and it's whoever wants it. There's a lot of parity between those three teams."
    The game was a low-scoring, defensive battle. Both teams utilized a full-court press and traps throughout the game.
    "To hold a team like Del Norte to 30 (points), that's phenomenal," coach Trujillo said.
    See Friday's Los Alamos Monitor for the complete story.

  • Show your love for youth in February

    WOW – February and the month known for love.
    This month, I am asking you to show your love for youth with a fun fundraising idea for our local non-profit 501-C-3, Champions of Youth Ambitions (C’YA). C’YA became official after writing the 100 Best Communities for Young People grant for Los Alamos with our official non-profit status recognition in June of 2014.
    I had an idea based on the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, but cheaper, easier and a whole lot sweeter.
    The idea is for you to bake a plate of cookies for anyone or donate $5 to Champions of Youth Ambitions (C’YA). We have an account with Los Alamos National Bank or donations can be sent to 77 Isleta Drive in Los Alamos.
    We plan to use the funds specifically to recognize youth in a small but meaningful way throughout the year. The idea gained a hold after no youth were recognized for the 2015 Community Asset Awards, the seventh year we will host the awards.
    We plan to do the Cookie Plate Challenge throughout February and then launch a youth winner in March, and follow that with a monthly recognition all year long. We plan to do it throughout the year and still include youth in the Community Asset Awards done at this time each year.

  • New exhibit opens at Mesa Library this week

    The public is invited to the opening reception for a new exhibit at Mesa Public Library, to be held 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday in the upstairs rotunda. The exhibit is entitled “West and East: Just for the Beauty of It.” The artists are SuFong Milonni and Barbara Yarnell. Both artists work in the medium of clay. The show will be in the gallery through Feb. 28.
    Yarnell was born in Los Alamos. Milonni was born and grew up in An-tung China in the northeastern part of China.
    “We met and have worked together at UNM-Los Alamos clay studio for over 10 years,” Yarnell said. “For this show, we went back to our original backgrounds for inspiration.”
    In this show Milonni’s works are in the oriental tradition and Yarnell’s are flavored by the southwest. Yarnell’s work is inspired by the mesas and enchanted sky of northern New Mexico, while Mei-li’s work is in the ancient tradition of Chinese celadon glazing.
    Yarnell’s work is fired in an electric kiln to a mid-range stoneware temperature. Milonni’s work is fired in a gas kiln to a higher stoneware/porcelain temperature.   

  • ‘In America:’ a hard-to-forget film

    Need a healthy cry? Catch “In America” (2002, rated PG-13) at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Mesa Public Library for a guaranteed catharsis.
    When the film opens, Johnny and Sarah Sullivan (Paddy Considine and Samantha Morton) are trying to immigrate into the United States, possibly hoping to outrun the death, about one year earlier, of their son Frankie.
    They and their two living children, 10-year-old Christy (Sarah Bolger) and 5-year-old Ariel (Emma Bolger), move into a tenement in New York City, a home to many drug addicts and one tenant described to the Sullivans as “the man who screams.” They appear to be the only family with young children in the building.
    Johnny, an actor, is often unemployed, but Sarah takes a job as a waitress at a local ice-cream shop and they scrape by. They make a friend in the building (the totally fantastic Djimon Hounsou) and embrace their new life as much as they can. However, they can’t put off grieving forever.
    Thoughtful, honest storytelling from writer/director Jim Sheridan makes “In America” the kind of film is hard to forget, in part because the story asks a lot of its viewers. This is not entertainment so much as a lesson in empathy, one that we might not want but can always use.

  • New Mexico begins process of debating open primary law

    Last week, two Democratic members of the state House, Reps. Antonio “Moe” Maestas of Albuquerque and Stephanie Garcia Richard of Los Alamos, introduced a proposed amendment to the state Constitution making it possible for voters registered as independent to cast their ballots in state primary elections.
    Also last week Donald Trump, the bloviated New York billionaire and self-advertised “frontrunner” for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination, pulled out of a Fox Cable TV “debate” with the other contenders in that race.
    Seems Trump declined to submit to questions posed of him by the moderator of that debate, Megyn Kelly, because he feels she doesn’t “respect” him. Fox News and Ms. Kelly, on the other hand, dismissed Trump’s tantrum with the suggestion that he doesn’t like difficult questions when he’s in the spotlight performing.
    You pick. My guess is both camps are probably correct.
    But Mr. Trump’s latest campaign stunt was at least a novel way to put on a show without the bother of putting on a show. It also underscores one of the chronic challenges associated with popular self-government.

  • Groups seek state override of local wage regulations

    A vast business coalition has massed behind a proposed state law that would preempt local laws. The proposal comes in the form of House Bill 211 from Rep. Jason Harper, a Rio Rancho Republican, and Sen. Mark Moores, an Albuquerque Republican.
    The Association of Commerce of Industry leads the effort with Jason Espinosa, ACI president, as the campaign’s public face.
    I presume HB 211 in part comes in response to the so-called Fair Workweek Act introduced last summer by Albuquerque City Councilors Isaac Benton and Klarissa Peña. Much tearing of hair was the Albuquerque response to the detailed regulations of the Benton-Peña proposal.
    ACI’s Jan. 26 release cited “the recent wave of local governments developing complex mandates for employers.”