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Today's News

  • Community Calendar 3-24-17

    TODAY
    Fish Fry Friday from 5-7 p.m. at Immaculate Heart Mary Parish Hall, 3700 Canyon Road. Cost is $10 for Adults, $7 for children.

    Gentle Walks at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free. More information at peecnature.org.

    Astronomy Show at 7 p.m. at the Nature Canter. Explore the night sky from the comfort of the planetarium. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children. More information at peecnature.org.
    SATURDAY
    Habitat for Humanity is hosting a Hawaiian at the Pajarito Brew Pub and Grill. Live Hawaiian-themed music. A special menu of Hawaiian and Hawaiian-inspired dishes and beverages. What better way to celebrate the arrival of spring? So don your loudest Hawaiian shirt and your best grass skirt and hula over to a tropical island paradise at the Pajarito Brew Pub and Grill.

    Snowshoe Hike in the Valles Caldera at 1 p.m. at the Nature Center. Join a ranger and PEEC on a 2 - 2.5 hour, easy-to-moderate snowshoe hike in the Valles Caldera National Preserve. Preserve entrance fee. More information at peecnature.org.

    Feature Film: Exoplanets at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center.

  • LA museums, parks won’t be affected by a state shutdown

    New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez on Thursday ordered a hiring freeze for all agencies under her control, a move designed to save cash pending a political standoff over the funding of state government and public schools.

    The state personnel director outlined the freeze in a memo to cabinet secretaries, citing the need for executive agencies to take immediate action to control spending due to unprecedented budgetary challenges.

    Despite the freeze, some hiring will continue for jobs identified as critical for public safety and health as well as those related to taxation and revenue collections.

    The memo did not mention the governor’s disappointment with the outcome of the legislative session that wrapped up more than a week ago. However, she has been outspoken about the Democratic-controlled Legislature sending her a budget built on $350 million in tax increases and fee hikes.

    “The fact is, state government affects every New Mexican, and passing a balanced budget is critical in funding education, public safety and service to protect abused children,” she said in a statement.

  • Assets in Action: Life is short — slow down, hold on for the ride

    This week, I feel like the column should be called, “It’s all about me,” and “It’s not about me at all.”
    Today starts the long, slow crawl to 50, and the previous year and a half has been a stressful time, to say the least.
    It has been a time to see what you’re made of, grab the bull by the horns and hold on for the ride.
    I’ve always had friends with children a year or two older than our children.
    I highly recommend it, because these little nuggets of wisdom can be stored, like a squirrel stores nuts and pulled out when you really need them.
    So the same might be true of having a friend that is a few years older than you. Perhaps it will help you see what’s ahead and perhaps at the same time, you don’t want to know.
    I had a friend that had already hit the magic age of 50. She had some health problems, but was battling through along the way.
    Then unexpectedly, she died in her sleep. Yep, 50 years old and gone overnight.
    My heart aches for her husband, because he’s just slightly younger than my husband and his life has been uprooted in a flash.

  • County DPU presents ‘Water is Life’ at Nature Center

    The Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities is bringing four speakers and a film to the Los Alamos Nature Center from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. April 4.
    The evening will start with a discussion about rivers and local water issues by four speakers followed by a break with refreshments and a chance to meet the speakers. Afterward, they will show the documentary This event is free.
    The four talks are:
    • Where the water we use in Los Alamos comes from, with some thoughts on a sustainable future by Jack Richardson, Deputy Utilities Manager – Gas, Water, Sewer (GWS) for Los Alamos County.
    • The End of the Dam-building Era in the Western US by Steve Harris, Executive Director of Rio Grande Restoration.
    • Rethinking the Rio: the opportunity and challenge of moving low-elevation storage from Elephant Butte to high-elevation reservoirs on the Rio Chama to conserve water from evaporation and restore flows to an ailing river by Jen Pelz, Wild Rivers Program Director at WildEarth Guardians

  • Community Calendar 3-19-17

    TODAY
    Business After Hours hosted by New Mexico Bank & Trust 1475 Central Ave. from 5-7 p.m. For more information, visit losalamoschamber.org.
    THURSDAY
    Nature Yoga at 5:15 p.m. at the Nature Center. Practice yoga with Christa Tyson at the nature center. Cost is $15 for non-members, $12 for members. More information at peecnature.org
    FRIDAY
    Gentle Walks at 9 a.m. at the Nature Center. A gentle walk for which the emphasis is on discovery, not mileage gained. Free.

    Fish Fry Friday from 5-7 p.m. at Immaculate Heart Mary Parish Hall, 3700 Canyon Road. Cost is $10 for Adults, $7 for children.
    SATURDAY
    Bird Walk: Cañada Bonita from 7 a.m.-noon at the Nature Center.
Observe local birds while quietly hiking through conifer forests. Free for members, $5 for non-members.
     
    Rockhound Geology Outing: Driving Tour of the Pajarito Plateau
from 9-11:30 a.m. Enjoy a scenic drive from White Rock to the Valles Caldera with stops along the way to learn about the fascinating geology of the Pajarito Plateau from geologist Patrick Rowe. Cost is  $7 for individuals, $14 for families; $5 for PEEC member individuals; $11 for PEEC member families.
     

  • Practical financial planning for parents

    Nathaniel Sillen

    Practical Money Skills

  • When legislators tackle big reforms, movement translates as progress

    Lawmakers this year took on some major reforms of old issues hovering over the state like turkey vultures waiting for road kill.  
    Interest groups ranging from Common Cause to the Greater Albuquerque Chamber of Commerce proclaimed progress. Maybe not as much as we hoped, but progress.
    The big reform bills were ethics, campaign finance, capital outlay, payday lending and taxes. Many were bipartisan.
    Years in the making, the ethics bill began bravely by standing up an independent ethics commission with subpoena power, protected by the Constitution. When it emerged after pummeling in various hearings, it was missing language that required complaints and hearings to be public, and the Legislature, not the law, will determine the commission’s powers and rules.
    Changes reflect legislators’ residual fear that the commission could become a political weapon.
    So voters in November 2018 will decide on a constitutional amendment creating an independent ethics commission.
    Common Cause and business groups cheered. New Mexico Ethics Watch booed, saying lawmakers gutted a strong bill.
    Kudos to Rep. Jim Dines, R-Albuquerque, who patiently listened to input and welcomed suggestions. The hearings themselves were a marvel. Instead of trying to kill the bill, lawmakers worked with Dines to fine tune the bill.

  • NFL owners revamp video replay for officiating

    PHOENIX (AP) — One day after approving the Oakland Raiders’ move to Las Vegas, NFL owners got busy passing several rules changes and adopting resolutions they believe will speed the game and enhance player safety.
    Most notable Tuesday was the change in handling officiating of video replays. Referees will now watch replays on the field using tablets, eliminating “going under the hood” to the watch on television monitors.
    League officiating chief Dean Blandino and his staff in New York will make the final decisions on those calls, with input from the referee, who in the past was the ultimate arbiter after consulting with league headquarters.
    “And I think that’s important to remember, we’re not taking the referee out of the equation,” Blandino has said. “The referee will still be involved, the referee will still give input, but will no longer have the final say.”
    Also at the league meetings owners extended bringing touchbacks out to the 25-yard line for another year; eliminating “leapers” trying to block field goals or extra points; added protections for defenseless receivers running their routes; and made permanent the rule disqualifying a player who is penalized twice in a game for specific unsportsmanlike conduct.

  • ‘Topper baseball, softball teams start District 2-5A seasons

    Both the Los Alamos Hilltopper baseball and softball teams get their District 2-5A seasons going starting today.
    Both teams will be at Del Norte to face the Knights to open 2-5A play today. Following today’s games – both single contests in Albuquerque – both teams will be at home Saturday to face off against Albuquerque Academy.
    For the Hilltopper softball team, it started off its season very well, winning four in a row, but have dropped five of six games since then, including four straight heading into this afternoon’s game with the Knights.
    Only one of those four recent losses has been particularly close. The Hillltoppers kept pace with the Rio Rancho Rams, a well-respected Class 6A program, in their game Friday, but the Rams prevailed 5-4.
    With those recent losses, the Hiltopper softball team is currently 5-5 on the year, but heading into the 2-5A season, only one of the five teams in district has more wins. Surprisingly, that team is the Capital Jaguars.
    The Jaguars are 6-6 right now and lost a close call Monday to its cross-town rival, the Santa Fe Demons. The Jaguars were down by three runs heading into their final at-bat, when they came up with a pair of runs to make the Demons sweat it out, but the Demons held on for an 8-7 victory at Santa Fe High School.

  • Arts & Entertainment Calendar 3-29-17

    Art exhibits
    The National Museum of Nuclear Science and History, 601 Eubank SE in Albuquerque, will host “Critical Assembly, the Secrets of Los Alamos 1944: An Installation by American Sculptor Jim Sanborn,” through Oct. 8. This special exhibit, created by world renowned sculptor Jim Sanborn – best known for creating the encrypted “Kryptos” sculpture at CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia – invites visitors to explore and study the recreations of the super secret experiments from the Manhattan Project’s atomic bomb program. The museum is open from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m., 361 days a year. For information, visit nuclearmuseum.org, or call 505-245-2137.

    “Oblique Views: Archaeology, Photography and Time.” Museum of Indian Arts and Culture, 710 Camino Lejo, Santa Fe. Photographer Adriel Heisey re-photographed some of Southwest’s most significant archeological sites that Charles Lindbergh and his wife, Anne, photographed in 1929. Exhibit runs through May.