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Today's News

  • Valentine’s Day ideas bloom in LA

    The hours are counting down to Valentine’s Day, which means couples may spend the next day or two frantically scrambling to come up with the perfect way to celebrate the romantic day.

    Here’s one suggestion: jousting. Or how about singing amorous songs? Or maybe even a good, old poetry competition?

    That’s evidently how the special day started out. According to “Debate of the Romance of the Rose,” by David F. Hult, the earliest description of Feb. 14 as an annual celebration of love appears in the Charter of the Court of Love.

    The charter, allegedly issued by Charles VI of France at Mantes-la-Jolie in 1400, describes lavish festivities to be attended by several members of the royal court. Those festivities included a feast, amorous songs, poetry competitions, jousting and dancing.

    Sprinkled amidst the festivities was a process in which the attending ladies would hear and rule on disputes from lovers.

    This may not be advisable. Perhaps keeping the day’s celebrations in the happy, feel-good theme would be best.
    But details of the first celebration get a little sketchy at that point. Evidently there are no other records of the court’s existence, and none of those named in the charter were present at Mantes except Charles’ queen, Isabeau of Bavaria.

  • Wanted by the IOC: A city to host the 2026 Winter Olympics

    PYEONGCHANG, South Korea — Wanted: A city to host the 2026 Winter Olympics.

    Getting bidders for the Olympics used to be easy. But no longer, and particularly for the Winter Games.

    Six European cities pulled out of official bids or possible bids when the IOC sought candidates a few years ago for the 2022 Winter Olympics.

    Cities balked over soaring costs, political unrest or a lack of public support as expressed in referendums.

    That left the IOC with only two proposals, both from authoritarian governments that backed cities devoid of winter sports traditions: Almaty, Kazakhstan, and Beijing, China.

    Beijing narrowly won, but that set off alarms at IOC headquarters in Lausanne, Switzerland.

    “The 2022 (bidding) certainly highlighted the problems we were facing in attracting cities, particularly winter cities,” IOC member and former vice president John Coates said. “We had to do something to address the cost of the games. Increased costs have forced our hand.”

    Coates said the International Olympic Committee is doing a “total rethink” over the way the games are presented to potential bidders, and how they’re sold to the public.

  • Cosgrove named UNM acting coach

    ALBUQUERQUE (AP) — Defensive coordinator Kevin Cosgrove will serve as acting football coach for New Mexico while head coach Bob Davie serves a 30-day suspension.

    Athletic Director Eddie Nunez announced the appointment of Cosgrove as acting coach on Friday, a day after university President announced that Davie’s suspension will begin Saturday.

    Abdallah announced the suspension last week after the school released the results of two recent investigations involving Davie and the football program.

    The investigations examined whether Davie and his coaching staff interfered with criminal investigations or misconduct cases involving players.

    UNM’s Board of Regents decided Tuesday not to accept Davie’s appeal of the suspension.

    Davie is two seasons into a six-year contract that runs through the 2021 season and pays him $822,690 annually, not including bonuses and incentives.

  • Atomic Tumblers dominate at invitational

    The Los Alamos Atomic Tumblers traveled to Albuquerque to compete at the Albuquerque School of Gymnastics, in their annual Black and White Invitational. Over 70 bronze and silver gymnasts competed on Friday night, while gold, platinum and diamond gymnasts competed on Saturday.

    Maya Graves scored the highest all around total of all Bronze competitors, with a 37.25, scoring 9 or above and taking the gold medal on all four events. The last time a LASG gymnast scored this high was Brianna Fryer in a JO level 7 meet last year.

    In the bronze division youngest division, Rafaela Rocha earned three gold medals, in the all-around, the bars and on the floor. She also earned a bronze on the vault.

    Anna Simakov was the standout in the youth division earning a gold on the floor and the bars, and a silver in the all-around and on the beam. She also earned a bronze on the vault.

    In the junior’s division, Meera Nadiga earned gold on the bars, finished with a silver on the vault and finished in a tie for silver in the all-around.  

    In the silver competition Holly Martinez was Los Alamos’ high scorer, earning a gold on the bars and the vault, and finishing with silver on the floor and in the all-around competing in the child’s division.

  • Mother, daughter boxers in West Texas battle for victories

    EL PASO, Texas — The sacrifice is impossible to measure as the hours pile upon hours, the sweat fills bucket after bucket and even a bit of blood and possibly a tear or two accumulate in the hard knock, unforgiving journey that is boxing.

    But both the pain and the joy are best when shared. And no one can share it like daughter and mother and grandmother. The sport has slowly, gradually built an indelible bond between three generations.

    The El Paso Times reports Kayla Gomez is but 14 years old, just an eighth-grade student at Bel Air Middle School. But she is already a five year veteran of the demanding sport of boxing and she has already won six national championships and earned a spot on the U.S. National Team. She dreams of going to the Olympics and then going pro.

    Crystal Aceves is 32 and is also a five year veteran of the sport ... bringing her daughter Kayla with her when they decided to get serious about boxing. And no sport demands that you be serious more than the sweet science. Aceves has competed in three national tournaments and has two-second place finishes and one-third place.

    Cindy Aceves is mother and grandmother and coach and travel partner and confidant for the two in their fistic quest.

  • Atomic City Update: New GPA requirements for sports are good idea

    Beginning next school year, no student with an “F” grade in any class will be eligible to compete in sports in New Mexico.

    I, for one, think this is a great idea for the New Mexico Activities Association.

    Until now, students could compete in sports as long as they had a 2.0 GPA and no more than one “F” grade.

    My problem with allowing a student to have an “F” in any class is that they are failing in their main role, as a student. For anyone in high school, that has to be the top priority.

    If competing in sports interferes with a kid’s ability to pass his classes, they no longer need to be on the field.

    Without a quality education, no amount of athletic ability will matter that much in the long run. After all, they are called student-athletes for a reason. The first part has always been far more important than the second.

    Competing in sports in high school is a privilege, something that is earned through hard work in the classroom. With these new rules in place, students will earn that right more than ever before.

  • United Church seeks donations for trip

    The United Church of Los Alamos is seeking donations for their Mexico Mission community auction in March. Items can be brought to 2525 Canyon Road and questions answered at 662-2971. Large items may be able to request a pick up.
    Adults from the United Church and the Unitarian Church will build homes for the poor during spring break.

  • David Mutschlecner to read from new work at library Thursday

    Poet David Mutschlecner will read from his latest book of poetry “Icon” as the latest offering in Mesa Public Library’s Authors Speak series.

    The reading starts at 7 p.m. Thursday in the Upstairs Rotunda of Mesa Public Library, 2400 Central Ave.
    Mutschlecner’s published work includes the poetry books “Esse,” “Sign” and “Enigma and Light” from Ahsahta Press, and “Veils” from Stride Press.

    With “Icon” Mutschlecner continues his exploration of theopoetics, which is “where poetry shines a light into theology, cleansing it of dogmatism while nurturing inclusivity.”

    He views poetry as a place where “intensifications of reality occur.” Poems from “Icon” will also appear in “New American Writing.”

    Ahsahta Press prides itself on championing and promoting “surprising, relevant and accessible experimental poetry that more commercially minded small presses avoid.”

    Although Ahsahta is the press affiliated with the University of Idaho, there are many connections to Los Alamos and northern New Mexico.

  • Pet Talk: Pets can have allergies, too

    With spring right around the corner, many of us are bracing ourselves for pesky allergies. Just like people, pets can suffer from allergies, too. While humans tear, cough, and sneeze their way through allergy season, pets usually deal with allergies differently.

    Dr. Adam Patterson, a clinical associate professor and chief of dermatology at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, said every animal has a different reaction to allergies, just as people respond to allergies differently. However, most animals display itch as a hallmark sign of allergic skin disease.

    “An itch may be manifested as licking, chewing, biting, rubbing, scratching, head shaking, and/or scooting,” Patterson said. “Common itchy body areas include the face, ears, paws, armpits, groin, rump, and anal region. Horses may present with an itchy skin disease and/or hives.”

    Allergens that most commonly irritate pets include fleas, pollen, molds, mites, insects, danders, and food.

  • Nature Center talk about photographing wildfires set for Tuesday

    What is it like to photograph wildland fires and firefighters? Kristen Honig will discuss her observations, show her photographs, and give a behind the scenes look at what it is like to be a wildfire photographer at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Nature Center.

    Honig’s wildfire photos have been recognized by National Geographic and featured in numerous magazines and publications, including Popular Science, Outside Magazine, High Country News, Wildland Firefighter Magazine, Fire Management Today, and in the novel “On the Burning Edge.”

    This special presentation at the Los Alamos Nature Center is free and made possible thanks to the Los Alamos Photo Club and the Pajarito Environmental Education Center.

    Los Alamos and the surrounding areas have been exposed to more than a half-dozen significant wildfires since 1977, including the 2000 Cerro Grande Fire that consumed more than 47,000 acres and damaged or destroyed more than 350 structures. The Cerro Grande Fire had a lasting impact on the community and inspired local photographer Honig to document not only the beauty and destructiveness of wildfires but also the sacrifices and camaraderie of the firefighters who battle them.