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Today's News

  • The bloodstained banner

    Once again, the Confederate flag is in the news. Washington and Lee University recently announced it would take down the Confederate flags, which had been displayed next to the university’s statue of Robert E. Lee.
    Twelve African American law students protested the display as being “hate symbols representative of slavery and racism.”
    Supporters of displaying the flag countered that “the Confederate flag honors freedom-loving Americans who fought against Northern tyranny” and that removing the flag “besmirched Lee’s military honor.”
    You do have to respect freedom-loving people who owned slaves. I suppose they’re also proud that the university owned about 80 slaves who were used to build dormitories in the early 1800s.
    The university’s website states, “The Washington and Lee University community thrives on an ethic of honor and civility.”
    I’m sure that’s exactly how their slaves viewed it.
    The university’s President Kenneth Ruscio did remove the flags, but refused to apologize for Lee’s actions during the Civil War. Ruscio said, “Lee was an imperfect individual living in imperfect times.”

  • Baseball gears up for 2nd half of year

    Sure, it was great for a couple days. The cheers for Derek Jeter. The power of Giancarlo Stanton. The excellence of Mike Trout in the American League’s 5-3 victory.
    Baseball’s All-Star party in the Twin Cities was a long series of smiles for players and fans. But the break is over now, and the real fun begins Friday night.
    Heading into the second half of the season, there are all sorts of compelling stories from coast to coast. It could be one fun summer in California, where Oakland begins the weekend with the best record in the majors, and the Giants, Angels and Dodgers are in prime playoff position. The trade deadline is in two weeks, and the recovery of several key injured players could dramatically affect a couple of divisions.
    The A’s bearded collection of shaggy misfits and stars is looking for the franchise’s first World Series title in 25 years. Sensing an opportunity, general manager Billy Beane got an early jump on the deadline when he acquired pitchers Jeff Samardzija and Jason Hammel in a deal with the Chicago Cubs on July 4.
    The blockbuster trade created an awkward scene at the All-Star game, where Samardzija was introduced with the NL reserves and then joined his new teammates in the AL dugout.

  • Snow is winner on Tuesday

    Mary Snow was the big winner in this week’s Pace Race.
    Snow had the top prediction in Tuesday’s race, which was hosted by the Atomic City Roadrunners. She finished with a  prediction error of just 8 seconds, which was 5 seconds better than runner-up Ted Romero.
    Tuesday’s Pace Race started at the ski lodge at Pajarito Mountain. There were several courses participants could choose from.
    On the 1-mile trail course, Bob Weeks finished in a time of 14 minutes, 20 seconds, while Artemia Rojas finished in 12:36 on the 1-mile road course.
    Inez Ross was the top finisher on the 2-mile road course with her time of 37:13. On the 2-mile trail course, Melina Burnside was the fastest finisher (21:09).
    Romero (23:33) and Roxana Candia (27:21) had the best finishes on the 3-mile course.
    The next Pace Race will be Tuesday starting at the picnic grounds on North Mesa. Race time is 6 p.m.
    For more information, call 672-1639 or visit the Roadrunners’ website, atomicrunners.com.

  • Licenses still available for elk, deer and javelina

    SANTA FE — The 2014-2015 hunting season is fast approaching, and hunters still have the opportunity to buy a hunting license in New Mexico.
    The New Mexico Department of Game and Fish still has more than 1,000 deer hunting licenses and nearly 500 javelina licenses for sale that were leftover from the annual hunt drawing.
    More than 1,000 youth encouragement hunting licenses for antlerless elk are also still available. Licenses will be sold online only on a first-come, first-served basis. Many of the leftover deer and javelina licenses are for muzzleloader or archery hunts, but there are a few youth only rifle hunts.
    The sale is open to everyone, regardless of residency. The youth encouragement elk license sale is open only to eligible New Mexico youths who successfully applied but did not draw a deer, elk, pronghorn, ibex, oryx or bighorn sheep license this year.
    Beginning at 10 a.m. Wednesday, the sale will open to all eligible youths, regardless of residency and whether they applied for the draw or not.
    Hunters must be younger than 18 years of age on opening day of the hunt to be eligible.
    To purchase a license, customers will need to log in to their Online License System account.
    For more information about available licenses, hunting in New Mexico or for help logging in, call at 888-248-6866.

  • Fishing Report 07-18-14

    Northwest

  • A Kiss For Luck

    Los Alamos’ Police Department held a promotion ceremony Thursday at Los Alamos Magistrate Court.

  • Medical chopper crashes, 3 dead

    edical helicopter flying to pick up a patient crashed into the side of a New Mexico hilltop early Thursday, bursting into flames and killing all three crew members on board, authorities said.
    The helicopter was flying from Christus St. Vincent Regional Medical Center in Santa Fe to Tucumcari when it disappeared from radar at 2:48 a.m.
    It went down near Newkirk along Interstate 40 about 135 miles east of Albuquerque and about 30 miles from Tucumcari.
    Ranch workers found the wreckage on the rocky, northern side of a mesa after authorities called and asked them to look around the area.
    “It crashed and burned,” said ranch manager Phil Bidegain. “No survivors .... Everything burned except for the very end of the tail.”
    Bidegain said a ranch cowboy he called to help him look for the craft told him he was awakened by a sound but went back to sleep because he didn’t know what it was.
    “When he got up he could see the flames,” Bidegain said.
    Hospital spokesman Arturo Delgado confirmed all three people on board were killed.
    Their identities were not immediately released, but he said the CareFirst crew was well-known at the hospital.

  • Court: gay marriage is OK in Oklahoma

    DENVER (AP) — A federal appeals court ruled Friday that Oklahoma must allow gay couples to wed, marking the second time it has found the U.S. Constitution protects same-sex marriage.
    The decision from the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upholds a ruling that struck down Oklahoma’s gay marriage ban. But the Denver-based court immediately put its decision on hold pending an appeal, meaning same-sex couple won’t be allowed to marry in Oklahoma for now.
    The 2-1 ruling comes after the same three-judge panel ruled in June that Utah’s ban on same-sex marriage violates the Constitution. It was the first time an appellate court determined that last year’s U.S. Supreme Court decision striking down the Defense of Marriage Act meant states couldn’t deny gays the ability to wed. That ruling also is on hold, and Utah’s attorney general has said he plans to appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.
    The lawsuit challenging Oklahoma’s ban was filed against the Tulsa County clerk, whose attorneys were still considering their options Friday afternoon. But they noted the panel’s dissenting judge argued that changing the definition of marriage should belong to Oklahoma residents, not a federal court.

  • Cause of airline missile strike unclear

    LONDON (AP) — To figure out why a Malaysian jetliner fell from the sky, investigators will use the wreckage of any missile found to determine where it came from and who fired it, experts said Friday. That may be easier said than done in the middle of a war zone.
    The first international monitors to arrive on the scene, 24 hours after Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 came down, found bodies strewn on the ground and restrictions from armed militiamen.
    That gives a sense of the formidable obstacles investigators face in deciphering a disaster scene spread over 20 square kilometers (eight square miles) of contested ground in eastern Ukraine — amid a conflict in which both sides have interests that may outweigh a desire to uncover the truth.
    “We are in a country that is at war, and that is in a war of communication,” aviation analyst Gerard Feldzer said in Paris. “Everyone is pushing a pawn.”
    All 283 passengers and 15 crew members aboard the Amsterdam-to-Kuala Lumpur flight were killed in Thursday’s crash. U.S authorities and aviation experts say the Boeing 777 was likely brought down by a ground-to-air missile, but so far there is no proof of who fired it. Ukraine and the insurgents blame each other.

  • Police Beat 07-18-14

    Police Beat items are compiled from public information contained in Los Alamos Police Department Records. Charges or citations listed in Police Beat do not imply innocence or guilt. The Los Alamos Police Department uses the term “arrest” to define anyone who has been physically arrested, server a court summons, or issued a citation.

    July 10

    4:01 p.m. — Rickie Burrell, 28, of Los Alamos was arrested through a magistrate bench warrant in the 600 block of San Ildefonso Road. The original charges stemmed from an incident that happened on June 22, 2014, where he was arrested for aggravated battery on San Ildefonso Road.

    11:59 a.m. — A 53-year-old Santa Fe man reported to police that he was the victim of fraud (more than $250, less than $2500) on Trinity Drive.

    3:04 p.m. — George Barela was arrested through a magistrate bench warrant in the 600 block of San Ildefonso Road. The original charges were failure to display a proper registration/licence plate and driving with a suspended or revoked license (not for DWI).

    July 11

    1:41 p.m. — A 51-year-old Ohkay Owingeh woman reported to police she was the victim of fraudulent use of a credit card without consent at Peach Street.