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Today's News

  • Religion Briefs 04-18-14

    LDS Pajarito Ward sponsors family history workshop

    The Pajarito Ward of The Church of Latter Day Saints is sponsoring a free Family History Workshop. The workshop will be from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 26 at 1967 18th, off of 15th and Sage Streets. Find ancestors with familysearch.org and experts will be on hand for assistance.
    The workshop will provide organizational tools to assist attendees on getting started on the genealogy of their families. Work stations with computers and tutorials will be available. Those interested are asked to bring names and dates to get started.
    The LDS Church in Los Alamos also has a Family History Center that is open on Tuesdays. Anyone interested in their family history may use the information at the center. For more information call Don Reid at 662-0355.

    Easter Story to be performed in S.F.

  • Easter-themed pets can be a huge responsibility

    From the abundance of chocolate candies lining the grocery store aisles to the colorful dresses hung in the children’s departments at the mall, there are many joyous symbols associated with the Easter holiday.
    Two very popular symbols, both irresistibly adorable and covered in fluff, are a chick or bunny on Easter morning. While giving these as gifts may seem like fun ways to celebrate the holiday at the time, it is important to remember that they are still long-term commitments that come with a lot of responsibility.
    Are you prepared to take on the challenge of caring for your little Easter fur ball once the holiday passes?
    Baby chicks are available for purchase at most any feed supply store for the low price of $1 for 3. Because of their easy availability and low initial cost, chicks are often impulse Easter purchases that people make without taking into consideration their present and future care requirements. As with all other pets, they too will soon outgrow their cute, baby-like phase.
    “An impulse pet is always a bad purchase,” said Dr. Mark Stickney, clinical associate professor at the Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. “It may look cute in the store, but Easter is gone in a day and then you have an animal to take care of long term.”

  • Some lines just can't be crossed

    A few weeks back, there was some discussion in the paper about the N-word.
    Earlier this year, the NFL began formal discussions on whether the N-word should be banned, and if so what penalty should be levied against a player for using it.
    African-American Richard Sherman, football cornerback for the Seattle Seahawks, thinks banning the N-word is in itself racist. He noted, “It’s weird they’re targeting one specific word. Why wouldn’t all curse words be banned then?”
    Sherman added that when spoken by an African-American and pronounced ending in “-a”, it is not racist.  In fact, in that situation, it’s considered a term of endearment.
    Term of endearment?  Harry Carlson, another African American NFL player, but from a generation prior, disagrees. He challenged younger players who use the “-a” version to “go visit your grandfather and use it on him. See how endeared he feels!”

  • Isotopes nip Chihuahuas, 2-1

    Miguel Olivo went 2-for-3 at the plate and drove in a run, while the Albuquerque Isotopes pitching staff had a second straight good outing against El Paso.
    The Isotopes nipped El Paso’s Chihuahuas 2-1 Thursday night in Albuquerque, giving the Isotopes their third win of the four-game series.
    The series with El Paso concludes tonight.
    Following tonight’s game, Albuquerque goes on the road for eight straight contests starting Saturday in Salt Lake City.
    Starting pitcher Henry Sosa gave up 9 hits in six innings of work, but didn’t allow a run. Sosa was replaced by Yimi Garcia (3-0), who pitched 1-1/3 innings to earn the win.
    The Isotopes (8-6) scored both their runs in the seventh inning. Along with Olivo’s RBI single, Mike Baxter had a solo home run to lead off the inning. 

  • Roundup: JV splits a twinbill

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper junior varsity baseball team took a split over the Bernalillo Spartans at home Thursday.
    Los Alamos lost the first game of the doubleheader 4-2, but came back to win the second game 7-2.
    The split puts the Hilltoppers at 8-7 on the season.
    Along with Thursday’s doubleheader, the Hilltoppers also played a doubleheader April 11 against Capital, winning those two games handily. The Hilltoppers picked up an 11-4 decision in game one against the Jaguars, then crushed the Jaguars 15-0 in the nightcap.
    Los Alamos’ JV has won five of its last seven contests. The Hilltoppers will host Santa Fe Tuesday.

    JV softball team drops home doubleheader

  • LA baseball earns No. 7 4A ranking

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper baseball team earned a No. 7 ranking in this week’s MaxPreps.com ratings of Class 4A baseball teams around the state.
    Los Alamos, which has won eight straight games, more than all but one 4A team in the state, is 14-6 on the season heading into a doubleheader against Bernalillo Saturday. It is also at the top of the District 2-4A standings.
    The 4A baseball rankings have only been published sporadically by the website this season.
    Piedra Vista is No. 1 in 4A baseball despite having a rather pedestrian 12-9 season record, although it has the best strength-of-schedule in the classification.
    In 4A softball, Los Alamos, which has been rated as high as No. 10 this season, finished 15th in this week’s rankings. Los Alamos is 10-10 on the season and trying to keep pace with Bernalillo and Santa Fe in the district standings.
    The Hilltopper softball squad will also be at Bernalillo for a doubleheader starting at 10 a.m. Saturday.
    In baseball, following Piedra Vista’s Panthers, the Goddard Rockets (11-3) are ranked No. 2, followed by Valencia, Farmington and defending state champ St. Pius X in the top five.
    Immediately ahead of the Hilltoppers is the Albuquerque Academy Chargers (10-7) in sixth place. The Chargers defeated the Hilltoppers 8-3 in March.

  • McClellan is tops at Pace Race

    Laura McClellan had the best prediction in this week’s Pace Race.
    The Pace Race, a weekly event hosted by the Atomic City Roadrunners, is a weekly event. Races are Tuesday evenings at various sites around Los Alamos County.
    This week’s race started and finished at the county’s ice rink in Los Alamos Canyon.
    It was a good night for predictors, as five competitors were within 25 seconds of calling their actual finish times.
    McClellan picked up the win, as she was just 9 seconds off her actual time. She beat out Heidi Bjorklund (18 seconcs), Liz McDonald (21 seconds), Nikol Strother (22 seconds) and Roy Cope (24 seconds).
    The fastest finishers on the 1-mile course were Patricia Burnside, who had a time of 8:59, and Paul Elkins, who finished in 14:12. On the 3-mile course, the top finishers were Strother (21:22) and Bill Rice (24:13).
    The next Pace Race will be Tuesday. It will be run on Cañada del Buey Trail in White Rock, starting near Chamisa Elementary School.
    Starting time is 6 p.m.
    For more information on next week’s race, call 672-9243 or 672-1639. More information can also be found by visiting the Roadrunners’ website, atomicrunners.com. 

  • Avs win in overtime

    DENVER (AP) — Patrick Roy showed as much boldness behind the bench as he once did as a Hall of Fame goaltender.
    The first-year Colorado coach made some daring moves late in the game — like pulling his goaltender with 3:01 remaining — and yet the ploy worked out.
    It’s been that kind of season for Roy and his youthful squad.
    Paul Stastny scored 7:27 into overtime after tying the game with 13.4 seconds remaining in regulation, lifting the Avalanche to a 5-4 win over the Minnesota Wild in the opener of the Western Conference quarterfinals on Thursday night.
    “We believe in ourselves,” said Roy, who won two Stanley Cup titles for the Avalanche as a player and helped guide the team back to the playoffs for the first time in four years.
    “Sometimes, you’re not playing your best game, but the quality of our team is we found a way to win this game. That’s what you want in the playoffs.”
    Gabriel Landeskog, Ryan O’Reilly and Jamie McGinn also added goals for Colorado.
    Stastny beat Ilya Bryzgalov with a close-in wrist shot in overtime, the same type of play Stastny used to tie the game in regulation.
    Not that the Avalanche were too surprised by the late rally because, “we’ve done it all year,” Stastny said.

  • 7.2 earthquake shakes Mexico

     

    ACAPULCO, Mexico (AP) — A powerful magnitude-7.2 earthquake shook central and southern Mexico on Friday, sending panicked people into the streets. Some walls cracked and fell, but there were no reports of major damage or casualties.

    The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake at about 9:30 a.m. (10:30 a.m. EDT; 1430 GMT) was centered on a long-dormant faultline northwest of the Pacific resort of Acapulco, where many Mexicans are vacationing for the Easter holiday.

    It was felt across at least a half-dozen states and Mexico's capital, where it collapsed several walls and left larges cracks in some facades. Debris covered sidewalks around the city.

  • Astronomers discover Earth-like planet

     

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Astronomers have discovered what they say is the most Earth-like planet yet detected — a distant, rocky world that's similar in size to our own and exists in the Goldilocks zone where it's not too hot and not too cold for life.

    The find, announced Thursday, excited planet hunters who have been scouring the Milky Way galaxy for years for potentially habitable places outside our solar system.

    "This is the best case for a habitable planet yet found. The results are absolutely rock solid," University of California, Berkeley astronomer Geoff Marcy, who had no role in the discovery, said in an email.

    The planet was detected by NASA's orbiting Kepler telescope, which examines the heavens for subtle changes in brightness that indicate an orbiting planet is crossing in front of a star. From those changes, scientists can calculate a planet's size and make certain inferences about its makeup.

    The newfound object, dubbed Kepler-186f, circles a red dwarf star 500 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cygnus. A light-year is almost 6 trillion miles.