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Today's News

  • US government won't reclassify marijuana, allows research

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration has decided marijuana will remain on the list of most-dangerous drugs, fully rebuffing growing support across the country for broad legalization, but said it will allow more research into its medical uses.

    The decision to expand research into marijuana's medical potential could pave the way for the drug to be moved to a lesser category. Heroin, peyote and marijuana, among others, are considered Schedule I drugs because they have no medical application; cocaine and opiates, for example, have medical uses and, while still illegal for recreational use, are designated Schedule II drugs.

    The Drug Enforcement Administration said the agency's decision came after a lengthy review and consultation with the Health and Human Services Department, which said marijuana "has a high potential for abuse" and "no accepted medical use." The decision means that pot will remain illegal for any purpose under federal law, despite laws in 25 states and District of Columbia that have legalized pot for either medicinal or recreational use.

    Advocates have long pushed for the federal government to follow suit.

  • Companies move forward on nuclear waste storage in Carlsbad

    CARLSBAD (AP) — Efforts to build a temporary nuclear waste storage facility in New Mexico are moving forward after a Denver-based company relinquished its rights to the land.

    The Carlsbad Current-Argus reports that Holtec International and Eddy Lea Energy Alliance are partnering to create storage for spent nuclear fuel rods from power plants across the country.

    Intrepid Potash gave up its mineral rights lease to land near Carlsbad, saying it likely won't be in a position to mine for potassium-containing salts there for several years.

    Program Director Ed Mayer says the HI-STORE Consolidated Interim Storage project is expected to cost more than $1 billion and provide about 200 construction and operations jobs.

    Holtec will propose the project to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in March. The approval process takes two to three years.

  • Teachers, students get back to business

    The atmosphere was calm and orderly at Los Alamos High School as high school seniors and their parents stopped in to register Tuesday morning, about a week before the official start of school Aug. 18.  
    Tuesday was also orientation day for 31 new teachers and staff.
    Though students seemed anxious to get back to school and their studies, it was also clear that they wanted to reconnect with their classmates.
    When asked about what they were looking forward to most, many said getting back with their friends.
    One dad, David Paulson, offered a different perspective.
    “I’m just looking forward to them being back in school so they’re not at home all day,” he said with a laugh.
    Like many students there though, senior Mark Torres was determined to squeeze the last few days of summer in before officially heading back. Torres said he was “not quite” ready.
    His mother, Carolyn Torres, a former New Mexico Teacher of the Year also said that she’s slowly getting back up to speed as well. “I’m getting there,” she said.   
    Though the lines were long, everything seemed under control as students went from one line to the other getting their photo IDs, their textbooks and their class schedules.

  • Today in history Aug. 11
  • Flood advisory from 12:42 p.m. until 2:45pm Saturday

    The National Weather Service in Albuquerque has issued an arroyo and small stream flood advisory for... Northwestern Los Alamos County In North Central New Mexico... South Central Rio Arriba County In North Central New Mexico... Northeastern Sandoval County in North Central New Mexico... Until 2:45 p.m.
    At 1240 pm MDT... national weather service Doppler radar indicated heavy rain due to thunderstorms north of Los Alamos... including Santa Clara canyon and northern portions of the Las Conchas burn scar area. Radar estimates up to one and a half inches of rain has already fallen with strong storms continuing over the area. Locations impacted include... Santa Clara Pueblo.
    Precautionary/preparedness actions: the heavy rainfall and slow movement of these storms may result in flooding of road intersections and low-lying areas. Waters may begin to run in normally dry arroyos.

  • Downtown experiences power outage

    The Los Alamos Department of Public Utilities reported a power outage in the downtown area at 3:25 p.m. The outage was caused by a fault to an electrical line on Juniper Street, which caused circuit 17 to open. Crews were able to restore power to most of the downtown area by 3:45 p.m. However, Bathtub Row is still without power and DPU was unable to provide an estimate of when power would be restored to that area. Follow the Los Alamos Monitor for updates.

  • Flash flood watch until 6 a.m. Thursday

    The National Weather Service has issued a flash flood watch from 6 a.m. Wednesday until 6 a.m. Thursday.
    The flash flood watch remains in effect through late tonight for a portion of North and Central New Mexico, including the following areas:
    Central Highlands... East Slopes Sangre De Cristo Mountains... Eastern Lincoln County... Estancia Valley... Far Northeast Highlands... Far Northwest Highlands... Jemez Mountains... Lower Chama River Valley... Lower Rio Grande Valley... Middle Rio Grande Valley/Albuquerque Metro Area... Northeast Highlands... Northern Sangre De Cristos Above 9500 Feet/Red River... Northwest Highlands... Northwest Plateau... Raton Ridge/Johnson Mesa... San Juan Mountains... Sandia/Manzano Mountains... Santa Fe Metro Area... South Central Highlands... South Central Mountains... Southern Sangre De Cristos Above 9500 Feet... Southwest Chaves County... Upper Rio Grande Valley... Upper Tularosa Valley and West Slopes Sangre De Cristo Mountains.

  • Community Calendar 8-28-16

    TODAY
    Feature Film: “We are Stars” at 2 p.m. at the Nature Center. This exciting, family-friendly film connects us to the evolution of the Universe and explores the secrets of our cosmic chemistry. Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children.
    MONDAY
    Nature Playtimes at 10 a.m. at the Nature Center. Join local families for fun in nature. Free.
    TUESDAY
    Coffee and Connections at 10 a.m. at Ruby K’s Bagel Café. This  monthly meeting is for swapping leads and exchanging ideas about resolving your business challenges with fellow Chamber members. Chamber representatives are on hand to answer questions about Chamber member benefits and upcoming events. Coffee and food are no-host. Reserve a seat online http://losalamoschamber.chambermaster.com/events/details/coffee-and-conn....

    Half-price sale on everything in the store at The Thrift Store at the United Church, 2545 Canyon Road, from 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

    Keystones of Water Quality: Macroinvertebrates at 7 p.m. at the Nature Center. Dr. Rossana Sallenave reveals how to protect our aquatic resources by using living organisms as a measure of environmental health. Free.
    WEDNESDAY

  • News for Retirees Aug. 28-Sept. 3

    Aug. 28-Sept. 3
    For information, call the Betty Ehart Senior Center (BESC) at 662-8920, the White Rock Senior Center (WRSC) at 672-2034 and “Day Out” (adult day care, 8 a.m.-4 p.m.) at 661-0081. Reservations: by 10 a.m. for lunches.

    Betty Ehart

    MONDAY
    8:45 a.m.        Cardio
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Mild Sausage, Rice Pilaf
    12:15 p.m.        Smart Driver Class
    6 p.m.        Argentine Tango dancing
    7 p.m.        Ballroom dancing
    TUESDAY
    8:45 a.m.         Variety Training
    11:30 a.m.        Lunch: Meatloaf     
    1 p.m.        Party Bridge (Classroom)
    7 p.m.        Bridge
    7:30 p.m.        Table Tennis
    WEDNESDAY
    8:30 a.m.        LAVA Quilters
    8:45 a.m.         Cardio Plus Exercise    
    10:30 a.m.        Music with Ruth    

  • Garden club to hold plant sale

    Summit Garden Club will hold a plant sale at the Los Alamos Nature Center, 2600 Canyon Road, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sept. 10.
    Over 300 landscape garden and indoor plants will be available for sale, in 2-inch to 1-gallon containers, and some even in 5-gallon containers.
    Spectacular, mature house plants will also be for sale. Members will demonstrate how to divide, store, care and plant iris. Iris rhizomes will also be for sale.  Club members also will be available to assist with plant identification and planting instructions.  
    A few examples of plants to be offered are coneflower, Mexican hat, coreopsis, oregano, chives, Rocky Mountain penstemon, phlox blue mist spirea, blue avena grass, yarrow, columbine and lavender. Some  houseplants for sale are amaryllis, Boston fern calla lily, ficus tree and jasmine.  
    Money collected from the plant sale will go to supporting Summit Garden Club projects. Among the activities of the club is the care of the White Rock Community Garden and gardens at Bandelier National Monument. The club also gives an annual scholarship to a graduating Los Alamos High School senior. Educational programs for members and the public are provided on different gardening subjects throughout the year.