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Today's News

  • View September night sky at nature center

    Do you want to know how to identify more of the planets and stars in the night sky? Pajarito Environmental Education Center is holding star shows in the Los Alamos Nature Center planetarium. This month the shows will be 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sept. 12.
    Each show will introduce celestial objects easily viewed through binoculars this month including planets, the lunar eclipse, star patterns, star clusters, nebulae, double stars and other celestial objects.
    The September Night Sky planetarium shows are $6 for adults and $4 for children. Tickets are available by calling or stopping by the nature center. Seating is limited.  Planetarium shows are suitable for ages three and up.
    Arrive at least 10 minutes early the planetarium shows. To help acclimate to the planetarium’s night sky, no one will be admitted after the show begins.
    For more information about this and other PEEC programs, visit peecnature.org, email programs@peecnature.org or call 662-0460.
    The Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC) was founded in 2000 to serve the community of Los Alamos. It offers people of all ages a way to enrich their lives by strengthening their connections to our canyons, mesas, mountains and skies.

  • Celebrate Los Alamos at fall gala

    Celebrate the community’s history on Sept. 12 at the Los Alamos Historical Society’s second annual Fall Gala.
    This year’s gala theme is the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II and will include a three-course dinner catered by the Blue Window Bistro, silent and live auctions, and dancing to the sounds of the Craig Martin Experience in historic Fuller Lodge.
    Funds raised support the operating budget of the Los Alamos Historical Society and Museum.
    This year’s live auction features historic experiences, such as a helicopter ride over the Pajarito Plateau, a tour of Ashley Pond’s first ranch school in northeast New Mexico, a tour of the Santo Domingo Trading Post during its restoration, and a ride to Bandelier in a Model T. An exclusive pre-Gala champagne reception, along with the announcement of the 2015 Los Alamos History Award winner, will take place at the Hans Bethe House on Bathtub Row.
    Tickets for the Gala are $70, and the Gala plus Bethe House Reception ($140), can be purchased at the Historical Museum or online at losalamoshistory.org. Seating is limited. For more information, visit the Los Alamos Historical Museum’s website or call 662-6272.

  • Community Briefs 9-2-15

    Celebrate life of Jeanne Stein at LALT

    Join the Los Alamos Little Theatre community in celebrating the life and theater contributions of Jeanne Stein, starting 6:30 p.m. Saturday at the Los Alamos Performing Arts Center, 1670 Nectar St.
    Stein was active in every theater organization in Los Alamos, including the Little Theatre, Light Opera and Don Juan Playhouse.  She was also an active member of New Mexico community theater organizations, and the American Association of Community Theaters, ACCT.  Her performances and directed productions won kudos at the state, national and international levels. Stein performed professionally, as well and was a SAG member.
    Light refreshments and beverages will be served while those in attendance share remembrances of Stein, while viewing photos and videos of her career.
    The public is invited to share memories of Stein, the performer and the person, during the evening.

    Volunteers needed for ‘Harvey’

    The Los Alamos Little Theatre is looking volunteers to do makeup and hairstyling for the upcoming production of “Harvey.” Opening night is Sept. 11.
    If interested, contact Paul Lewis, plewis0@comcast.net, or Fred Brueggeman, fredjeanne@aol.com.

    Fall Fiesta set for Little Forest Playschool

  • Community calendar 9-2-15

    Celebrate life of Jeanne Stein at LALT

    Join the Los Alamos Little Theatre community in celebrating the life and theater contributions of Jeanne Stein, starting 6:30 p.m. Saturday at the Los Alamos Performing Arts Center, 1670 Nectar St.
    Stein was active in every theater organization in Los Alamos, including the Little Theatre, Light Opera and Don Juan Playhouse.  She was also an active member of New Mexico community theater organizations, and the American Association of Community Theaters, ACCT.  Her performances and directed productions won kudos at the state, national and international levels. Stein performed professionally, as well and was a SAG member.
    Light refreshments and beverages will be served while those in attendance share remembrances of Stein, while viewing photos and videos of her career.
    The public is invited to share memories of Stein, the performer and the person, during the evening.

    Volunteers needed for ‘Harvey’

    The Los Alamos Little Theatre is looking volunteers to do makeup and hairstyling for the upcoming production of “Harvey.” Opening night is Sept. 11.
    If interested, contact Paul Lewis, plewis0@comcast.net, or Fred Brueggeman, fredjeanne@aol.com.

    Fall Fiesta set for Little Forest Playschool

  • Cat-and-house tale a delight for Hitchcock fans

    It begins! The 2015-2016 season of Mesa Public Library’s Free Film Series charges out of the pen this week with Alfred Hitchcock’s classic “To Catch a Thief” (1955, rated PG), screening at 6:30 p.m. Thursday in the upstairs meeting room theater.
    In this jewel of a movie, Cary Grant plays John Robie, aka “the Cat,” a retired burglar renowned for his silence on rooftops and his fine choice in purloined gems.
    After serving six years in World War II, his debt to society now repaid, Robie wants only to live quietly in his mansion in the French Riviera. However, a copy “Cat” has brought the police to his chateau. In order to return to his life of peaceful opulence, Robie must catch the new Cat himself.
    A good chase should always feature a beautiful blonde, and Grace Kelly fits the bill quite well. Kelly plays Frances Stevens, whose mother’s neck sparkles like stars on the Mediterranean. Robie recognizes Stevens’ mother as a potential target and stays close. Stevens keeps him a little closer than his plans absolutely require.

  • Sport your alma mater
  • ‘Monitor’ publisher to speak at next Lunch with a Leader

    The League of Women Voters will have its monthly community event, Lunch with a Leader starting 11:45 a.m. Sept. 15 at the Mesa Public Library.
    The month’s leader is the publisher of the Los Alamos Monitor, David Puddu.
    Puddu has been a newspaper publisher for 28 years. Originally from Pennsylvania, he earned a journalism degree from the University of Nebraska. He has been in Los Alamos for one year. Prior to his arrival, he spent 13 years as VP/COO of Number Nine Media, Inc. a subsidiary of the Albuquerque Journal. Before that, he spent 14 years publishing newspapers in ski resort communities in Colorado.
    Puddu was the 2005 president of the New Mexico Press Association and has served as a regional director for the National Newspaper Association overseeing the states of Colorado, New Mexico, Utah and Wyoming. He also served on the executive committee, Congressional Action Team and marketing/membership co-chair for the National Newspaper Association. He and his wife, Deborah are the parents of Lana, Sophia and Noah.
    Puddu will be talking about the changes he and his team have made to the Monitor, current issues in newspapers, and will be answering questions from those present.
    To order a $10 meal from the Los Alamos Co-op Market, contact Karyl Ann Armbruster, 231-8286 or kaskacayman@gmail.com to get the many menu choices.

  • Perfect pitch: How to avoid common presentation pitfalls

    If you’ve ever had to pitch a business or product idea to an investor or potential partner, you know the presentation can make or break the deal.
    Because the stakes can be high, serious entrepreneurs quickly learn what to avoid when giving a presentation, whether it’s a 30-minute speech before a peer group or six-minute proposal to Demo Day investors.
    Some of the presentation do’s and don’ts are intuitive: Think about what keeps you engaged when someone’s talking and what makes your attention drift to your email in-box.
    Every presentation should be a story with a logical beginning and end and a narrative thread that connects these dots. In the business world, it often starts with a problem that your product or service ultimately solved.
    If your creation is interesting, the story of its genesis should be equally compelling. Once you’ve framed the tale and decided what to emphasize in the allotted time, determine how you’ll sidestep the most common public presentation minefields.
    Avoid jargon: Lingo or other coded language alienates people who don’t speak it, and it even bores professionals who are fluent. Pretend you’re explaining your product or service to an inquisitive 10-year-old and use words designed to draw her in rather than exclude her from the conversation.

  • ‘Progressive’ agenda outlined in new book

    The left has a mythical attachment to raiding the Permanent Fund for money to spend on education.
    My rough measure is the volume of applause after every mention of the idea at a recent gathering in Albuquerque to debut the new book, “New Mexico 2050,” edited by Fred Harris, a former Oklahoma Senator and longtime Corrales resident.
    The applause came from what appeared to be a large proportion of the 250 or so people in the audience vigorously cheering the permanent fund raid and other liberal shibboleths. The audience included several presumed candidates for governor, Harris said, the unstated further presumption being that the candidates were Democrats.
    I noticed only Alan Webber of Santa Fe, a result of reading his name badge.
    Bald heads and gray hair were everywhere.
    Controlling audience speechifying became a bonus task for Harris as moderator. The McCune Foundation provided money “to assist with project expenses,” he said. A McCune employee, Henry Rael, was a contributor.
    The book’s economic summary seems comprehensive, even including four pages on labor force participation, a favorite topic in this column that is commonly ignored by people discussing the state economy.

  • ’Toppers start home tournament with OT win

    Despite leading most of the contest, the Hilltopper boys soccer team (1-0-1) needed overtime to take down previously unbeaten Clovis (3-0-1) in the first round of its home tournament Friday morning, 2-1.
    After scoring in the 79th minute, Clovis had all of the momentum heading into the extra period.
    Los Alamos’ Levon Wiggins. however, got the golden goal in the 84th minute to send the Hilltoppers to the semifinals in the Louie Cernicek bracket Saturday morning. Visit lamonitor.com for more tournament coverage.
    Wiggins got the ball deep in Clovis territory. Clovis’ goalkeeper then dove after the ball, but Wiggins kept it away from him.
    Another player slid trying to knock the ball loose, but Wiggins chipped the ball over him for the score, and the win.
    “Clovis was flying high so we needed an outstanding individual effort like Levon’s to win the game,” Los Alamos head coach Ron Blue said. “For us to regroup, stay organized and give ourselves a chance to win was outstanding.”