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Today's News

  • Returning to LA

    The first time Texan Americana musician Ray Wylie Hubbard came to Los Alamos, there was a cloud hanging over the town, literally.

    The Cerro Grande Fire had just finished rampaging through the area and people were anxious to see what  had happened to their houses, family and friends.

    Despite the dour situation, Hubbard’s memories of the place are pleasant.

    He described the crowd as being “warm and generous.”

    “We had a great time,” Hubbard said.

  • PEN&INKee^POSSIBILITIES: The vices and virtues of television ee^

    TV can be a real hazard – a roadblock on the path toward accomplishing any item on a to-do list. I’ve known people who avoid the contraption altogether because it makes them drift away from productivity. As a child, I took an art class at the local recreation center and I remember the teacher proudly commented her TV was stowed away in a closet and was only brought out in times of dire need – to watch landmark events in action or the newest big disaster.

  • Shedding light on New Mexico

    “Impressionism in New Mexico,” the current exhibit at the Art Center at Fuller Lodge, truly embodies ACFL’s underlying philosophy: To enrich the human imagination through nurturing and supporting visual arts.

  • Committee narrows choices down to top five

    As their deadline looms closer, the Municipal Building Site Selection Steering Committee continues to work feverishly in an effort to come up with a site recommendation for a new municipal building.

    The committee met again last Thursday to discuss the results of a straw poll they’d been given. At their first four meetings, the committee considered 23 possible sites for the location of a new municipal building.

    The 23 sites included some that were privately owned as well as some that are already owned by the county.

  • Embracing some big questions

    You’ve seen “Contact,” right? Jodie Foster, the Very Large Array, a very attractive wormhole?

    Robert Zemeckis’ 1997 adaptation of the Carl Sagan novel of the same time blew my dad away. Until I recently watched the film again, that was kind of all I remembered about it: My dad, going on and on about the awesomeness.

    It would be a pitiful understatement to say that when anyone mentions “Contact,” he gets starry-eyed. He gets Jodie-Foster-eyed. But mostly, he just believes.

  • Los Alamos names new weapons leader

    Los Alamos National Laboratory announced a change at the top Tuesday.

    Charles McMillan becomes principal associate director for Weapons Programs, succeeding Glenn Mara, who has retired.

    McMillan advances from his previous role as associate director for weapons physics.

    His new responsibilities call for providing oversight and direction for the nuclear weapons program at the lab and its core mission, “ensuring the safety, reliability and performance of the nation’s nuclear deterrent.”

  • T-Board discusses street standards

    The New Mexico Department of Transportation’s planned improvements for NM 502/DP Road may be on hold for a couple more years, but the Los Alamos County Community Development Division is still working on a plan for complete streets.

    The topic of Downtown Street Standards was on the agenda at the last Transportation Board meeting. At that meeting, the Board met with the Downtown Street Standards Committee to discuss the possible endorsement of the Downtown Street Standards Committee’s vision, goals and objectives.

  • Momentum building for Los Alamos Cooperative Market

    More than 350 people have become members of the Los Alamos Cooperative Market to date.

    Even more joined Saturday when co-op movers and shakers conducted tours for nearly 100 people at the store’s building site in Entrada Business Park, just west of De Colores Restaurant near the Airport Basin.

    “It’s going to be a full grocery store with a deli, meat counter, canned and frozen foods as well as health and beauty products,” co-op Vice President Karen Kendall said.

  • Dwarf car racing turns into big hobby

    David Hand first set eyes on a dwarf car in 2005 when Jim Shinn entered Hand’s shop, Jona Manufacturing Services on DP Road.

    Shinn asked Hand to fabricate some special parts for him. Hand took one look at the undersized racing vehicle and was hooked.

    “I jokingly asked if he needed a driver and he told me  he had had another car,” Hand said during an interview this morning. “We went down in Rendija Canyon and I drove it around, then started racing for him.”

  • Teaching safety in an inventive way

      Safety is a lesson that can never be ignored, but to capture students’ attention, the presentation needs to be interesting. As one of the winners of Honeywell’s Got 2B Safe! Awards, Mountain Elementary School fifth grade teacher Sue Souza received a $500 Staples gift certificate to assist her in grabbing students’ attention about safety.

    What is her mechanism to accomplish this objective? Puppets.

    Souza said she wants to incorporate puppets in her lesson and wants students to create scripts.

    Why puppets?