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Today's News

  • Labor Day with not enough jobs to go around

    “Water, water everywhere, nor any drop to drink,” is a memorable and usually misquoted paradox from Coleridge’s “Rime of the Ancient Mariner.” It describes a ship stuck in the middle of the ocean, but it applies symbolically to many other situations.

    One of them is about work and unemployment.

  • Football: LA gets shut out in season opener

    Following the Labor Day weekend, there will be plenty of labor going on around the Los Alamos Hilltopper football program.

    In their 2009 season opener Friday night, the Hilltoppers were thumped by the Class AAA St. Michael’s Horsemen. The Horsemen scored three times in the second half including on their first possession of the half following a Hilltopper fumble to pick up a 27-0 win at Sullivan Field.

    Friday’s win for the Horsemen was one of their most decisive in the long history between the two squads.

  • Cross country: Topper boys take fourth at UNM, girls finish eighth

    Things are still progressing about as expected for the Los Alamos Hilltopper cross country teams as evidenced by their first race of the season Saturday.

    The Hilltopper girls finished eighth at Saturday’s University of New Mexico Invitational meet Saturday while the Hilltopper boys took fourth place in team competition. The powerful Academy boys won Saturday’s team title and Academy’s girls finished second behind Chaparral, Colo.

  • Volleyball: LA wins a pair in gold bracket play

    The Los Alamos Hilltopper volleyball team grabbed two match win and two pool play wins at its tournament in Moriarty.

    The Hilltoppers picked up victories over a pair of Class AAAA schools, Kirtland Central and host Moriarty Saturday at the Pinto Invitational.

    Los Alamos advanced in the tournament to the gold bracket of the Pinto Invitational by placing second in its four-team pool Friday. After a first round loss in pool play, Los Alamos downed Moriarty 3-0 and Kirtland Central 3-1 to wrap up the tournament.

  • Rodenator helps control gophers

    It’s been an active summer for the animal residents of Los Alamos, particularly the rodent and rattlesnake population.

    There’s been an up-tick in the rodent population in Los Alamos because of heavier rainfall this summer, according to the people who have to deal with them.

    As a result, there’s also been a spike in the number of rattlesnakes being spotted in residents’ yards.

  • Church members to take a pilgrimage

    Monday marks the end of the summer and for a nearby Orthodox Monastery, the celebration of its annual feast day, the Feast of the Archangel Michael.  Each year this annual pilgrimage draws visitors from throughout New Mexico and Southern Colorado.  

    Members and the priest of Saint Dimitri Orthodox Church will join in the annual event with Rev. John Hennies, who serve as the priest at the Divine Liturgy, which will begin at 10 a.m. at the monastery church.  

  • Science Cafe kicks off new season

    The Café Scientifique New Mexico is launching its new season with an interactive talk on forensic seismology by Terry Wallace titled, “We know where you are and what you are doing.”

    Wallace will show how seismic waves can be used to deduce what happened during events like the sinking of the Russian Kursk submarine in 2000, which killed all 118 sailors and officers on board, and the gas pipeline explosion in southern New Mexico in 2001 that killed 11 nearby campers. 

  • Tracking the sputtering monsoon of 2009

    The on-again, off-again monsoon continued in August. Rainfall from Aug. 12-14 and Aug. 23 -24 was clearly associated with monsoon conditions; moisture flow from the south and heat-triggered convection.

    The rest of August was generally dry, although some mountain showers cropped up during the last few days of the month.

    Even with the last-minute boost, however, the rainfall total for the month was about half of normal in both Los Alamos and White Rock.

  • May 10, 2010 falls on a Monday

    Sept. 2, 1752 was a Wednesday. Adding fourteen days (two weeks), can you figure out what day of the week Sept. 16, 1752 was?

    Halloween falls on a Saturday this year. July 4 next year will be on a Sunday.

    If you own a perpetual calendar, you can look these dates up.

    But without having a calendar handy, could you determine on what day of the week Valentines Day falls next year? Or Christmas? Your birthday? Uh, okay ... how about Easter Sunday?

  • Trinity on the Hill celebrates new hall