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Today's News

  • Honor to all who served

    SANTA FE  — On Veterans Day let us pause to remember those who have served our country. Many of the thoughts and words that follow come from Dave Clary of Roswell, a loyal reader and an abundant source of information, inspiration and ideas.

    All those who heeded their call to duty deserve to be honored but today let us pay tribute to some of those who were our heroes.

  • More work to do on change

    Although the world-wide International Day of Climate Action – urging  legislators around the world to bring the carbon level back to 350 parts per million – is over, some of us who participated in the Los Alamos gathering thought the community might enjoy looking at the creative ways that groups turned themselves into the numbers “350.”  Take a look at 350.org  to see 181 countries from Mongolia to Antarctica, icons from the pyramids to the Great Barrier Reef, activities from kayaking to sky-diving, people from U. S.

  • Climate change needs urgent action

    Our government officials and legislators have plenty of things to work on these days — both at the national and local levels. The economy, health care, education, two wars and state budget cuts — the list goes on and on. But there is a giant looming behind these issues that is more important than all of them: global climate change. Bad decisions or inaction in any of the other areas — even the wars — can have serious consequences but can be remedied.

  • Los Alamos company garners coveted safety award

    Los Alamos Technical Associates recently achieved a significant safety milestone at one of its clean-up sites.  

    LATA’s Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site remediation project in Ohio on Nov. 11 marked 1,000 consecutive days without a lost work day incident.  

    The employees of LATA/Parallax Portsmouth, LLC, the U.S. Department of Energy’s environmental remediation contractor at the site, have surpassed more than 1.3 million safe work hours.  

  • A few tasty bites of science

    My 84-year old mother bent over the cookbook one day recently and read aloud to me as I wolfed down a chicken sandwich I’d made at lunchtime. The reading was a lesson in how to make a traditional – and very fine as it turned out – pork roast.

    Personally, I suspect it would be morally responsible to live as a vegetarian, and certainly good for my family’s health and for the nation’s medical-care bills. But I’m a sinner, and my kitchen produces meat and poultry meals on a daily basis.

  • It's not the journey, but the ride

    In this season of Thanksgiving, I was reminded that we all get snowed under by day-to-day life. Too many errands to do, too much work — keep the house tidy, look after the kids. Life can be a whirlwind sometimes. But when you hear of bad news, or you get bad news yourself, it kind of reminds you what we should really be thankful for.

  • Thanksgiving is a time for reflection

    SANTA FE — It will be a little more difficult for many New Mexicans to celebrate Thanksgiving this year. Bad economic times have hit us hard in the past 12 months causing layoffs, furloughs, business failures and bankruptcies.

    But most will still want to give thanks for having been born in this great country and having enjoyed blessings that much of the rest of the world doesn’t offer. And there still are reasons to give thanks for family, friends and good health.

  • County Administrator announces restructuring

    County Administrator Anthony Mortillaro announced Wednesday that he had named Regina Wheeler to a newly titled position, assistant to the county administrator.

    Among several organizational changes that came out of a period of review and consultation with staff and county councilors, Mortillaro also added the role of administrative services director to the responsibilities of Chief Financial Officer Steve Lynne.  

  • County officials share their holiday wishes

    Senior Historian James W. Bakereeat Plimoth Plantation states that the reason there are so many myths associated with Thanksgiving is that it is an invented tradition.

    The day doesn’t originate in any one event, Baker said. It is based on the New England puritan Thanksgiving, which is a religious Thanksgiving, and the traditional harvest celebrations of England and New England and maybe other ideas like commemorating the pilgrims.

    In Los Alamos, one annual tradition is county and school officials express Thanksgiving wishes to the community.

  • School officials extend Thanksgiving thoughts

    As is the tradition each year, Los Alamos Public School officials take time out to express their Thanksgiving wishes.

    Los Alamos Superintendent of Schools Gene Schmidt shared his wishes to the community for this holiday.