.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Golf: NNMSMGA recent results

    Here are the results from the Northern New Mexico Senior Men’s Golf Association tournaments at Cattails Golf Course in Alamosa, Colo., and the Rio Grande Club in South Fork, Colo.

    July 21

    Cattails Golf Course, Alamosa, Colo.

    First flight

    First low gross

    Grover Hathorn, South Fork, Colo., 81.

    Second low gross

    Cole Proctor, Texas Creek, Colo., 82.

    First low net

    Carl Liddell, Alamosa, Colo., 67.

    Second low net

    Mike Porter, Alamosa, Colo., 71.

  • Community reflects on an exemplary life

    Dr. James E. Loucks gave birth to some 7,500 babies during his distinguished career as an obstetrician-gynecologist. One of the founding fathers of Los Alamos as a self-governing entity, Loucks died Aug. 1.

    People who knew him, generations of people he literally brought into the world and people who were touched by his generosity and spirit have been reminded again what a special person he was and what a profound loss the community now suffers.

    The doctor and his family

  • Some things you already knew

    Anybody who reads my ramblings knows that I like trivia, obscure facts and stuff like that.

    Well, my wife came across this on the web and I thought it was interesting enough to pass on. And besides, maybe you can learn something.

    • Stewardesses is the longest word typed with only the left hand.

    • Lollipop is the longest word typed with your right hand.

    • No word in the English language rhymes with month, orange, silver or purple.

    • Dreamt is the only English word that ends in the letters “mt.”

  • Some hard choices ahead

    The council is faced with two very important decisions right now. We think they are acting properly in regards to one but we have some serious questions about the other.

    When County Administrator Max Baker announced his decision to retire, we thought we were told that there would be an honest, open process. And while it is still early, we are still waiting for that process.

  • County fair offers food, fun and festivities

    Ashley Pond was the place to be on Saturday for food, fun and entertainment. There was a little something for everyone at the pond, as Los Alamos County residents came out in droves to take part in the festivities associated with the Los Alamos County Festival, Fair and Rodeo.

     

    Crowds in search of their favorites such as Haagen Dazs and kettle corn crowded around vendor booths in search of their food fix.

     

  • Learning lessons from the past

    New Mexico’s economy is in a weakened state. There’s been job cutting, hatches have been battened and belts have been made tighter. Although it may feel unexpected and surprising, a sour economy has visited the state before.

    David Kammer, through the New Mexico Endowment for the Humanities, will discuss this historical period during his lecture, “New Mexico’s New Deal: A 75th Anniversary Perspective,” at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Fuller Lodge. The talk is part of the Los Alamos Historical Society’s lecture series.

  • Coffeehouse: How history is made

    The Los Alamos Coffeehouse was a tradition for years. When the concert series came to a close in 2008, music fans across the county collectively sighed in a minor key and when violinist Kay Newnam and the Los Alamos Arts Council announced the return of the Coffeehouse for a special, one-time event, it was like the moment when a favorite musical theme makes its comeback in a long, challenging composition.

  • Showing off talents

    Exhibits ranging from finely sewn quilts to vegetable baskets were exhibited during the County Fair.  The entries were displayed at Mesa Public Library.

  • There are currently several nails in the coffin of a nuclear policy that has strongly favored commercial reprocessing and recycling of plutonium. Ivan Oelrich wants to make sure it doesn’t pop open again.

    A recurring idea in the political tug-of-war between proponents and opponents of nuclear energy, nuclear reprocessing is intended to achieving a plutonium fuel cycle, and thereby provide a plentiful supply of nuclear fuel and a more easily-stored waste product.

  • Talk on Thursday focuses on plutonium reprocessing

    There are currently several nails in the coffin of a nuclear policy that has strongly favored commercial reprocessing and recycling of plutonium. Ivan Oelrich wants to make sure it doesn’t pop open again.

    A recurring idea in the political tug-of-war between proponents and opponents of nuclear energy, nuclear reprocessing is intended to achieving a plutonium fuel cycle, and thereby provide a plentiful supply of nuclear fuel and a more easily-stored waste product.