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Today's News

  • Espionage suspect explains strategy

    During a three hour interview Wednesday afternoon, former Los Alamos National Laboratory physicist P. Leonardo Mascheroni spoke in detail as to why he thinks the FBI seized property from his Camino Mora home Monday.

     “The FBI came to my home about 9:30 a.m. Monday and asked to come in because they wanted to talk to me about something. I let them in and they presented a search warrant,” Mascheroni said. “It’s very clear it is treason - the case the government wants to make against me - I was never a spy.”

  • A timeless story gets on the screen

    It’s amazing that the book, “Where the Wild Things Are” only needed a few sentences to become beloved by young readers for generations. It’s not just the words that resonate with people – you see the story’s illustrations everywhere – coffee cups, T-shirts, posters and stuffed animals. To make a movie after a book that every kid has read and memorized and that features illustrations that everyone recognizes seems tough. There is sure to be someone who will huff, “This is not as good as the book.”

  • Talking taxes

    Budget and finance matters preoccupied Los Alamos county councilors at their regular meeting in White Rock Tuesday night.

    After approving an ordinance early in the evening to issue up to $25 million in bonds related to utility system projects, councilors had a lot more to say about budget matters during a portion of the agenda devoted to budget guidance.

    County Chief Financial Officer Steven Lynne asked for suggestions in several key areas of the budget, using a prepared list of policy questions as a starting point.

  • Officials surprise Baker with tour

    An Atomic City Trolley rolled up to the door of the unsuspecting county administrator’s downtown office at noon Wednesday, where he was hosting a final meeting with senior staff.

    Staff who attended the meeting and hundreds more throughout Los Alamos and White Rock were in on the secret kept from County Administrator Max Baker for several weeks.

  • PEN AND INK POSSIBILITIES: A little help from my friends

    ­­I’ve always been proud of my independence. I feel as though I can go anywhere by myself – a movie, a restaurant, another country – and be just fine.

     I still relish the time in high school when I traveled to London with a school group proceeded to purchase a ticket to see an evening production of the musical, “Rent.” I traveled to and from the theater all by myself.

  • Support the summer concert series

    Russ Gordon, organizer of the Los Alamos County Summer Concert Series, is putting on a show Friday although not in the usual settings.

    Acoustic slide guitarist and banjo player Tony Furtado will perform at 8 p.m. at the Blue Window Bistro. Tickets for the concert cost $12.

    Hearing Furtado live is well worth the money, which will help support next years’ summer concert series.

  • Swine flu-related deaths reach 16 in New Mexico

    Novel H1N1 influenza is the predominant strain of flu in New Mexico at this time. All positive flu tests are presumed to be novel H1N1 influenza. The Department of Health is tracking hospitalizations and deaths to determine if there is a change in the severity of the disease.   

    The severity of illness due to novel H1N1 influenza has not changed nationally or in New Mexico from the spring.

    Influenza-Like Illness

  • Say “no” to reverse Robin Hood handout

    In case you haven’t heard, there will be no cost of living increase for Social Security recipients next year. This has spurred outrage and consternation on Capitol Hill. After all, seniors vote in large numbers and are a politically-powerful voting bloc, so efforts to placate senior citizens are usually received favorably in Congress.

  • People in glass houses shoudln't throw stones

    I have known Penny Granich and her family since 1999.  She worked for me at the Blue Window Bistro as my manager.  She is a great worker.  I got to know her family also at that time.  I have watched as she has struggled to keep afloat after the horrific accident of Dec. 4, 2005.  I was saddened by Tom’s death.  I sat through the trial and was thrilled when her not-guilty verdict was read.  We thought it was finally over.

  • New eyes and new ideas

    This year is the 400th birthday of science and engineering. It’s an occasion worth noting and giving thanks for because each day those twin disciplines improve the lives of billions of people around the world. (Beyond that, science and engineering are awfully fun, so their total effect is sort of like combining doing good all around the planet with the pure joys of playing chess).